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  1. #1
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    Default Sending American Children to Private School in the Dominican Republic

    My wife, who is Dominican, and I, have two brand new twin babies (boy and girl). Even though they very young still, we are already saving money for their college educations, which will cost a small fortune seventeen years from now. In the meantime, we will have to get them through primary school. The public school system where we live in the northeast of the US is good but private education is generally always better than public. There are private primary schools near where we live but twelve years of private primary school tuition, times two, will cost as much as, if not more than, the aforementioned small fortune college tuitions.

    So, I have been kicking around an idea. We could send the twins to a private school in the DR for a year, or two, or three, or four. Doing so could give the kids exposure to their mother’s homeland and a closeness with that side of the family. Of course, when the kids reach school age, I may not want them to live away from me for that long. But I am just kicking the tires on this idea for now.

    Could the twins get a first class education, commensurate with the kind of education they would get at a private primary school in the northeast of the US? Does anyone have any experience with this sort of thing? A big concern I have is the transition, from one country to another, from one educational style to another. Would a Dominican private school prepare/prime them for the academic rigor of a competitive American college?

  2. #2
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    I personally haven't heard of DR-taught alumni excelling at anything in the US beyond what the baseball farm can do for potential candidates. Not to say it's impossible.

    Consider a public school system in the Northeast that isn't entrenched with the UFT union and issues academic reports every year. Charter schools are competitively leading from this front.

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  4. #3
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    I do not think that any sort of a school system is going to make up for having a mother and father at home together-- in whichever country.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainannie View Post
    i do not think that any sort of a school system is going to make up for having a mother and father at home together-- in whichever country.
    this!!!!!!!!!!!

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    By the time your twins are old enough to enter the first grade, it should be possible to determine the academic ranking of public schools in your area. I sent my daughter to private schools here in Miami because I wanted her to know Spanish as well as English. She did fine with this, but she never got a decent education in math. Private schools are better in some ways and worse in others. As a college professor at a small college for 40 years, I can say that teachers in private schools have lower salaries, miserable benefits and dicattorial administrators. They are superior because they can boot out discipline problems. They are generally inferior at teaching sciences and math, because, well, mathematicians and scientists are very good at math, and less touchy-feely, artsy-craftsy and idealistic about education. Why teach at Country Day for $35K when you can get $55K in a magnet public school?

    The right wing hates unions and thinks all teachers who belong to unions are bad teachers and care more about money than education. The reality is they hate teachers because teachers are good at organizing voters for Democratic candidates. As someone who taught in public schools both in a union and a non union and in a college that had no unions, I consider this to be a myth, that at most applied at one time to NYC Public schools a decade or more ago.

    The current movement is to rate public schools. Private schools generally are not rated with the same tests, and they tend to use rather a lot of puffery to retain students. I have taught in both public and private schools here in Miami on a part-time/ summer job permanent sub, and neither were vary efficient or delivered what they claimed to deliver. The public schools had a horrible bureaucracy that made little sense. The private school paid poorly and the overpaid administrator was overbearing and had a bunch of pet theories, some of which were valid and others that truly sucked.

    I cannot address schools in the DR at all. I tend to think that sending kids away to another country for their education for more than a year, rather than staying with their parents would be in most cases not such a great idea. I did send my daughter for a semester in Israel for her junior year of HS, though neither my ex nor I are Jewish, and it was a great experience for her. She came back knowing how to study and far less jaded.

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  9. #6
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    They could always go and find out about their other roots when they are out of High School or on Vacays?

    I agree sending them that young without parents would be not a healthy situation. Unless the DR has the best schools possible and I Don't think that is the case.
    What do i really know, i don't have kids....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Omar_NYC View Post
    I personally haven't heard of DR-taught alumni excelling at anything in the US beyond what the baseball farm can do for potential candidates. Not to say it's impossible.
    Listed below are some of the winners of the distinguished Alumni Awards for Carol Morgan School. I taught the children of some of these ladies and gentlemen and they are gracious and lovely families that offer the world far more than baseball talent. Although as the parent of a Dominican born aspiring major league player there is nothing wrong with baseball talent believe you me.

    2003 Simon Suarez – Class of 1968
    President of the Caribbean Hotels Association and Executive Vice President of Coral Hotels. First Alumni to become Board President of Carol Morgan School.

    2004 Juan Batlle – Class of 1972
    Doctor in Ophtalmology, President National Committee for the Prevention of Blindness, Dominican Society of Ophtalmology (SDO) (President 1987-1988).

    2005 Manuel Grullon – Class of 1970
    CEO Grupo Popular

    2006 Julio Santos Munné – Class of 1984
    B.S. in Electrical Engineering, and a B.S. in Mathematics/Computer Science from the University of Notre Dame, and a M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Northwestern University. Had a major role in the mechanical design of the entire Cobotics product line Inventor of image guided surgical and interventional systems.

    2007 Ligia Bonetti – Class of 1986
    Vicepresident Business Development, Kimberly Clak products for Mercasid, S.A. Vicepresident Consejo Nacional de la Empresa Privada, Recipient of several awards as a distinguished female leader in Dominican Republic.

    2008 Todd J. Martinez – Class of 1985
    Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Professor at Stanford University, Ph. D., Recipient of several awards as researcher.

    2009 Mary Fernandez – Class of 1974
    Partner and Founder of Headrick Rizik Alvarez & Fernández. Head of the Legal Commettee of the American Chamber of Commerce of the Dominican Republic (AMCHAMDR) and the Board of Directors of the Asociación Dominicana de Propiedad Intelectual, Inc. (ADOPI).

    2010 Jose Rafael Yunen – Class of 1990
    MD, Internal Medicine and Infectious Disease Fellow, Surgical Critical Care Fellow, Critical Care Medicine Attending Montefiore Medical Center, Moses Division Cardiothoracic and Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Liver Transplant Team Assistant Professor at Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, New York (2008-Present). Director of Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Director of Intermediate Care Unit, Co-Director of Infectious Diseases & Microbiology at CEDIMAT, Plaza de la Salud, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic (2008-Present).

    2011 Gregory Castleman – Class of 1972
    Bachelor of Science in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering from Webb Institute of Naval Architecture. Has developed new designs for floating oil and gas production platforms, floating and self-elevating drilling platforms, and wind turbine maintenance vessels, as well as, designed for a variety of state-of-theart tugboats, high speed crewboats, container carriers, and tankers.

    2012 Steven J. Puig - Class of 1978
    Master's degree in International Management from the American Graduate School of International Management of Arizona, and a degree from Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service,Washington, D.C. He is Vice President for the Private Sector and Non-Sovereign Guaranteed Operations at the Inter American Development Bank (IDB). Mr. Puig has been responsible for coordinating the IDB Group's private sector and non-sovereign guaranteed operations.

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  12. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xavier_Onassis View Post
    The right wing hates unions and thinks all teachers who belong to unions are bad teachers and care more about money than education. The reality is they hate teachers because teachers are good at organizing voters for Democratic candidates. As someone who taught in public schools both in a union and a non union and in a college that had no unions, I consider this to be a myth, that at most applied at one time to NYC Public schools a decade or more ago. .
    So you taught in NYC and saw it happen there, but don't believe it happens anywhere else? I got news for you, it's a big problem and getting bigger. The left is huge on indoctrinating kids. Doesn't matter though, home schooling is on the rise, and public schools will continue to go downhill.

    But, the op isn't really concerned about lib union teachers in the US.

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  14. #9
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    I would not send my child to a school in the DR if I had any choice in the matter at all.
    Aside from the votes the UFT is out of control. They teach socialism, athiesm, forbid the pledge of allegience, it really is sickening what is going on in some of our schools. They sing songs about the cult of Obama

    Figure out your local schools and hire a tutor for your kids in any area where they may be lacking. I would imaging science and math because those are the hardest subjects that somehow dont get taught anymore.

  15. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by expatsooner View Post
    Listed below are some of the winners of the distinguished Alumni Awards for Carol Morgan School. I taught the children of some of these ladies and gentlemen and they are gracious and lovely families that offer the world far more than baseball talent. Although as the parent of a Dominican born aspiring major league player there is nothing wrong with baseball talent believe you me.

    2003 Simon Suarez – Class of 1968
    President of the Caribbean Hotels Association and Executive Vice President of Coral Hotels. First Alumni to become Board President of Carol Morgan School.

    2004 Juan Batlle – Class of 1972
    Doctor in Ophtalmology, President National Committee for the Prevention of Blindness, Dominican Society of Ophtalmology (SDO) (President 1987-1988).

    2005 Manuel Grullon – Class of 1970
    CEO Grupo Popular

    2006 Julio Santos Munné – Class of 1984
    B.S. in Electrical Engineering, and a B.S. in Mathematics/Computer Science from the University of Notre Dame, and a M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Northwestern University. Had a major role in the mechanical design of the entire Cobotics product line Inventor of image guided surgical and interventional systems.

    2007 Ligia Bonetti – Class of 1986
    Vicepresident Business Development, Kimberly Clak products for Mercasid, S.A. Vicepresident Consejo Nacional de la Empresa Privada, Recipient of several awards as a distinguished female leader in Dominican Republic.

    2008 Todd J. Martinez – Class of 1985
    Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Professor at Stanford University, Ph. D., Recipient of several awards as researcher.

    2009 Mary Fernandez – Class of 1974
    Partner and Founder of Headrick Rizik Alvarez & Fernández. Head of the Legal Commettee of the American Chamber of Commerce of the Dominican Republic (AMCHAMDR) and the Board of Directors of the Asociación Dominicana de Propiedad Intelectual, Inc. (ADOPI).

    2010 Jose Rafael Yunen – Class of 1990
    MD, Internal Medicine and Infectious Disease Fellow, Surgical Critical Care Fellow, Critical Care Medicine Attending Montefiore Medical Center, Moses Division Cardiothoracic and Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Liver Transplant Team Assistant Professor at Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, New York (2008-Present). Director of Medical-Surgical Intensive Care Unit, Director of Intermediate Care Unit, Co-Director of Infectious Diseases & Microbiology at CEDIMAT, Plaza de la Salud, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic (2008-Present).

    2011 Gregory Castleman – Class of 1972
    Bachelor of Science in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering from Webb Institute of Naval Architecture. Has developed new designs for floating oil and gas production platforms, floating and self-elevating drilling platforms, and wind turbine maintenance vessels, as well as, designed for a variety of state-of-theart tugboats, high speed crewboats, container carriers, and tankers.

    2012 Steven J. Puig - Class of 1978
    Master's degree in International Management from the American Graduate School of International Management of Arizona, and a degree from Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service,Washington, D.C. He is Vice President for the Private Sector and Non-Sovereign Guaranteed Operations at the Inter American Development Bank (IDB). Mr. Puig has been responsible for coordinating the IDB Group's private sector and non-sovereign guaranteed operations.
    Carol Morgan from what I've heard is an excellent school but then again one pays for that through the nose. How much are school fees?

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