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  1. #1
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    Default An American becoming a DR citizen - is your U.S. Social Security monies at risk?

    Permanent residents may apply for citizenship after 2 years as permanent residents...what happens if you are from the US?
    If an American becomes a legal DR citizen will you forfeit your future social security payments from the U.S. Social Security Administration at that point?
    Does anyone in this forum have a Dominican passport and a US Passport? (Dual citizenship?)

  2. #2
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    ""A U.S. citizen may acquire foreign citizenship by marriage, or a person naturalized as a U.S. citizen may not lose the citizenship of the country of birth.U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one citizenship or another. Also, a person who is automatically granted another citizenship does not risk losing U.S. citizenship. However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by applying for it may lose U.S. citizenship. In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. citizenship." US State Department Services Dual Nationality

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2020 View Post
    Permanent residents may apply for citizenship after 2 years as permanent residents...what happens if you are from the US?
    If an American becomes a legal DR citizen will you forfeit your future social security payments from the U.S. Social Security Administration at that point?
    Does anyone in this forum have a Dominican passport and a US Passport? (Dual citizenship?)
    My landlord is Dominican, but also a naturalized US citizen. He gets his Social Security with no problem - I know because I helped him set up direct deposit a year or two ago.

    He has two passports, and no problems with the SSA.

  4. #4
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    "or a person naturalized as a U.S. citizen may not lose the citizenship of the country of birth." That works if you are not born in the US. Not the other way around. Read carefully:

    "However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by ** applying for it ** may lose U.S. citizenship. In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. citizenship."

    Of course, if you are or get married to a Dominican, different story.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Expat-in-Cabarete View Post
    "or a person naturalized as a U.S. citizen may not lose the citizenship of the country of birth." That works if you are not born in the US. Not the other way around. Read carefully:

    "However, a person who acquires a foreign citizenship by ** applying for it ** may lose U.S. citizenship. In order to lose U.S. citizenship, the law requires that the person must apply for the foreign citizenship voluntarily, by free choice, and with the intention to give up U.S. citizenship."

    Of course, if you are or get married to a Dominican, different story.
    THAT is key...
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  6. #6
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    The US will make you pay to give up your citizenship. You will not have a problem collecting Social Security payments from the US if you become a dual US/DR citizen.

  7. #7
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    Your social security payments are basically pension payments. You have to pay into the system to get anything out. The amount you receive depends on how many quarters and how much you paid into the system. Your citizenship or lack there of has no bearing on the situation. You only have to be somewhere that you can receive your payments electronically. A natural born citizen of U.S. has to jump through hoops and be able to prove and demand that they want to give up their citizenship. The U.S. won't let go easily because it means they could eventually loose legal claims to any of the former citizens assets.

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