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Thread: Cobradores

  1. #1
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    Default Cobradores

    While shopping for a car, i.e., waiting for someone to shop me the right vehicle, I'm using public bus transportation. My initial apprehension regarding this method quickly changed to a respect for the system and those who use it. In particular, "el cobrador," the guy (haven't seen a cobradora yet) who collects fares like the conductor would on commuter trains back home, is unique. He hangs out the doors calling shots, and makes sure no one is left behind. So far they have all exhibited politeness, professionalism, and good memory for knowing the faces that need to be charged (they do not use reminder tickets as they do on commuter rails).

    A shout out to the ridership too. The ladies are generally well-coiffed and their nails well-manicured, amongst other attributes. All-in-all my bus riding experience has been a pleasant and rewarding one. Oh, I do a lot of walking and moto riding to get places also. What say the DR1 community about bus riding in the DR?

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  3. #2
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    I am in Santo Domingo and several years ago I thought the transportation system here was the craziest thing on earth............. but once you learn the system it is really a great way to get from point A to point B. I once thought I could never live without a car but in SD it is so easy to do especially living in Gazcue.

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  5. #3
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    Reckon you must be living in a good area, you don't have to travel too far and not during rush hour.


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    i enjoyed traveling in a guagua because each trip was an adventure. i have seen buckets of (live) fish, giant cakes, furniture an various assorted items being transported. i traveled standing on the step or squished between/under/atop dominicans. it was fun while it lasted. now i appreciate comforts of own car.

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  10. #6
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    I use guaguas and carro publicos too.....
    Buy an xtra place or 2 if u want space.......
    Guananico/imbert. 50 pesos in a carro publico.
    Imbert/POP. 35 pesos (I think ) in a guagua.
    If in luck carro publico Guananico/POP direct. 100 pesos.

    I dont go very far on a 100 pesos of gasolina in my Suv......

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    On my second bus ride (still not confident) I happened onto the bus as boarding was just beginning. I got on and was brushed by a lady getting off. The bus was empty. I picked a seat in the second row. There was a half full/empty bottle of Gatorade on my chosen seat. I thought the lady that brushed me must've forgotten it and that if she missed it she might come back for it. I put it on the seat in the first row and sat down. Forgetting about the Gatorade, I began to make myself comfortable when I was abruptly interrupted by a lady sternly looking down on me and asking "Adonde esta la botella que estaba en ese asiento?" I hesitated slightly before I told her that I had put it on one of the seats in front of me and felt I had done a good deed. The lady recovered the bottle, sat next to me in the seat where she had left the bottle, but continued to look disdainfully. It hit me in that moment that the bottle (or anything else) left on a seat is actually a placeholder. Live and learn.

    Today, God's honest truth, I was first on the bus and so sat in the first row (nothing on any seats that I could see). Almost immediately, the driver turns to me, hands me a spray can of some kind of cleaner, and mumbles some instruction. I thought he wanted me to clean the seats, or something, until again it became clear that he wanted me to put it on the seat next to me as a placeholder. The seat was filled again by a strikingly good looking woman. Hooray for ridership. Hooray for learning

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  13. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigbird View Post
    I am in Santo Domingo and several years ago I thought the transportation system here was the craziest thing on earth............. but once you learn the system it is really a great way to get from point A to point B. I once thought I could never live without a car but in SD it is so easy to do especially living in Gazcue.
    I love Gazcue and I'm bewildered by the transportation system there. Please! Tell me, what's the secret?

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    Quote Originally Posted by RonS View Post
    I love Gazcue and I'm bewildered by the transportation system there. Please! Tell me, what's the secret?
    Make plenty of mistakes, make a few more mistakes and sooner or later it starts to come together.

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  16. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by RonS View Post
    I love Gazcue and I'm bewildered by the transportation system there. Please! Tell me, what's the secret?
    Oh, and also try to use the Metro as often as possible.

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