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Thread: Electric bill - la planta

  1. #1
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    Default Electric bill - la planta

    I live in a 24/7 power grid zone which means my electricity has only gone out 35 times in the last 4 weeks. Now when the power goes out it takes about 20 seconds for the building full planta to get up and running. Now when the planta is running I assume my electric meter is still spinning. If this is the case then I am paying Edeeste for electrical power they actually did not provide.

    My question, I wonder if the building association gets some type of financial reimbursement from the electrical company?

  2. #2
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    Not sure what to tell you bigbird but assume nothing and fact find all you can. I am from California where one of our governors sold our energy off, bought it back at a higher price and was recalled. When you know the transition happens go and look at your meter to see if it is running. Take a look at your lease/purchase agreement to see who is paying for the gap of power you are provided during the outage. Document everything and keep scanned copies of everything. You never know when they will be needed. If you have to prove a fraud records you keep will be your only hope for a fair outcome. Know that only you will protect you and your interests. Be sure you are paying for it one way or another.

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    While it is illegal for the power company to cut power to a contracted customer, you are in the DR and you will not be able to sue them for damages. You will just have to live with the situation. Otherwise there would be about 8 million lawsuits agains the EDE's.

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    when the generator or inversor is on that means the street power is off and your meter is not running.

    forget about suing CDEE, it's like suing a dead chicken for choking on a bone: guarantees you a bed in a lovely house with rubber walls and no doorknobs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dv8 View Post
    when the generator or inversor is on that means the street power is off and your meter is not running.........
    This may be true in a single family dwelling where the ATS (automatic transfer switch) can be installed after the metering device but in an apartment building there is only one ATS and it is installed ahead of the electric meters.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigbird View Post
    This may be true in a single family dwelling where the ATS (automatic transfer switch) can be installed after the metering device but in an apartment building there is only one ATS and it is installed ahead of the electric meters.
    That doesn't sound right. I've never heard of an apartment building where the meters are running when the generator is on and street power is 'off'.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mauricio View Post
    That doesn't sound right. I've never heard of an apartment building where the meters are running when the generator is on and street power is 'off'.
    The building I am in that is how it is set up. They were doing some work in the electric room one day and I took a look inside. The ATS is wired in ahead of the meter bank. There are not individual ATSs after the meters for each apartment.

  11. #8
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    20 years ago, I got a "Hot Shot" from the elecric company.
    (Ultra HIGH Voltage" that fried some appliances, blew out light bubs, etc.
    :Supposedly" you could contact the EDDES with a list of your "Fried" stuff, and they would compensate you for your loss, IF you could PROVE that they were at fault.
    I tried, I was "Innocent" to the real DR back then, they determined that THEY were NOT AT Fault!
    If not THEM, WHO, was sending high voltage surges into my house???
    Today I would just agree with "dv", why bother, It "Ain't Gonna Happen"!
    CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
    Sitting in my living room, watching all the light bubs blow up WAS interesting!
    To say the least.
    The smell of burning electric motors, and TVs was NOT!!!!

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  13. #9
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    "Dominican RULE" .."All money belongs to the head of the owners association"!
    "No Fui Yo"!!!!!!!
    CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC

  14. #10
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    Let me try to explain this a little better. The building I am in is less than three years old and has a planta for the entire building. Now I have seen this configuration in the USA and don't know if it works here. When the utility power goes out the emergency generator starts up. The ATS is in line ahead of the meter bank. The ATS switches over and power to the entire building is being provided by the emergency generator.

    Now the trick to this method is each apartment meter continues to spin as if the utility company is providing the electric. The emergency generator has a meter connected and monitors how many kilowatt/hours the generator has provided for the month. Each tenant gets a bill for total electric used regardless of who provided it. Now the utility company pays to the building association an amount each month for the electric the emergency generator provided which is no big deal because they collect that cash from the tenants.

    This is not your simple case of a one family house where the inversor or generator can be easily be installed after the metering device. So no need to hate the messenger when you don't understand the message.

    It really is a simple and practical way to provide full power to multiple dwellings. The utility company loves it because they usually pay out at the lower kwh rate. The building association is in favor because they are at least getting some money coming in to cover the cost of running the generator, and tenants like myself love it because we are never no more that 20 seconds without power.
    Last edited by bigbird; 04-29-2014 at 07:25 PM.

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