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  1. #1
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    Default Just As MANY of Us Here Have Been Saying For YEARS,....

    The "REAL PRESIDENT" of the DR is the "Transportation Unions"!!!!!!!
    Check out the "Boquechivo" political cartoon in this morning's "Diario Libre" newspaper!!!
    Two truck drivers saying the same thing!!!!!
    Caption:,
    "Don't know why they say that "Danilo" is the president, when we are the one's that give the orders here"???

    How TRUE!!!!!!!!!
    And it doesn't matter which party's "president" is sitting in the office!

    CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC

  2. #2
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    The transport unions are largely responsible for killing off the Free Zones...
    Cabin Attendant,
    Augusto Pinochet Helicopter Tours

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  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobraboy View Post
    The transport unions are largely responsible for killing off the Free Zones...
    how?////

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainannie View Post
    how?////
    Jacking up the rates to service them...

    Companies in Free Zones work off very tiny quantity-driven margins. Getting stuff to and from ports is a significant expense.

    Free Zone businesses were "won" by promising super low transport & wage rates. It takes very little to change the dynamic. When you win business on price, you will ultimately lost it on price.

    Wage increases were also largely responsible for the collapse of Free Zones.
    Cabin Attendant,
    Augusto Pinochet Helicopter Tours

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobraboy View Post
    Jacking up the rates to service them...

    Companies in Free Zones work off very tiny quantity-driven margins. Getting stuff to and from ports is a significant expense.

    Free Zone businesses were "won" by promising super low transport & wage rates. It takes very little to change the dynamic. When you win business on price, you will ultimately lost it on price.

    Wage increases were also largely responsible for the collapse of Free Zones.
    Having owned businesses in the zonas francas... It was a combination of artificially controlled exchange rates, the advancement of Chinese manufacturers, and labor costs vs China and Haiti that forced us to migrate our production elsewhere in the mid-late 2000's. We've gone from 13000 employees down to 1500 in DR now. We never considered inland transit costs as a significant/deciding factor in the shift of production.

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  8. #6
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  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by CFA123 View Post
    Having owned businesses in the zonas francas... It was a combination of artificially controlled exchange rates, the advancement of Chinese manufacturers, and labor costs vs China and Haiti that forced us to migrate our production elsewhere in the mid-late 2000's. We've gone from 13000 employees down to 1500 in DR now. We never considered inland transit costs as a significant/deciding factor in the shift of production.
    are you saying that the peso was overvalued?

  10. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CFA123 View Post
    Having owned businesses in the zonas francas... It was a combination of artificially controlled exchange rates, the advancement of Chinese manufacturers, and labor costs vs China and Haiti that forced us to migrate our production elsewhere in the mid-late 2000's. We've gone from 13000 employees down to 1500 in DR now. We never considered inland transit costs as a significant/deciding factor in the shift of production.
    The exchange rate has a magnifying effect on all costs, so we may be saying the same thing.

    A manager friend for a big US clothing manufacturer in Free Zones is shifting production elsewhere citing increased costs-including, specifically Union demands-as the reason.
    Cabin Attendant,
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  11. #9
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    Just yet one more example of "Dominicanos", Killing the "Golden Goose"!!!!!
    CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC

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  13. #10
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    Blaming unions is a favorite motive given by companies. It is not necessarily the real reason. More likely the company pencil pushers simply determined that they could pay even less by shifting the production to some other place. This could easily include kickback schemes to company execs. There is a constant race to the bottom involved in this.

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