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  1. #1
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    Default Surge protector or Voltage stabilizer?

    Hello

    Kind of goes with the new fridgerator thread. If it is one with sensitive circuit boards what would you use to protect it from the very reliable electric grid in DR. Surge protector or voltage stabilizer or both?? Wife ones a new one for stateside and send the older on down for the house. Im just worried about shipping it down and with the first outage frying it.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    I have lived here for 20 years, I have neither, and have never "Fried" a "Fridge".
    A "Surge Protector" is a few dollars, a "Voltage Stabilizer" is NOT, plus, it uses some electricity it'self.
    Shipping down a "Fridge" can be several hundred dollars.
    Might not be worth it!
    CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC

  3. #3
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    We have a whole house voltage regulator, makes a big difference in the way our appliances run. In our case, our house's voltage runs very low, so this is a miracle for us. Wasn't that expensive, I think about 5000 pesos, maybe less. Our electrician builds them himself.




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  5. #4
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    A chica paid 15,000 for the one in my apartment. Plugs straight into the wall. Electricity goes on and off all day. No electricity,
    food and drinks get warm. Electricity comes on (you guessed it) food and drinks get cool. One of my brothers is an
    electrician by trade. He told me so long as my apartment isn't struck by lightning it should be just fine. Call me stupid but
    I figure I got a better chance of winning the local lottery than being hit by lightning.

  6. #5
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    im a trying to figure out what she paid 15k for...

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  8. #6
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    you can get fridge protectors ........ they plug into the socket & you plug the fridge into them
    they shut off for under & over voltage

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  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by CristoRey View Post
    A chica paid 15,000 for the one in my apartment. Plugs straight into the wall. Electricity goes on and off all day. No electricity,
    food and drinks get warm. Electricity comes on (you guessed it) food and drinks get cool. One of my brothers is an
    electrician by trade. He told me so long as my apartment isn't struck by lightning it should be just fine. Call me stupid but
    I figure I got a better chance of winning the local lottery than being hit by lightning.
    This is something else. The one we have is the size of a electrical panel box, and it is mounted outside in our pump house between the electrical pole and the house. All the electric for the entire property goes through it first.




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  11. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Los Lobos View Post
    If it is one with sensitive circuit boards what would you use to protect it from the very reliable electric grid in DR. ... Im just worried about shipping it down and with the first outage frying it.
    Ideal voltage for all electronics is even when incandescent bulbs dim to 50% intensity. When voltage goes lower, then electronics simply power off. Where is this 'frying' from a low voltage? Identify a part that is damaged by low voltage? No body can for one simple reason. Fears also proved Martians were invading Browns Mills.

    Low voltage damages no electronics. But low voltage can harm electric motors. Voltage variation is quite normal for electronics. But is a threat to motors. So the utility cuts off power if voltage cannot be maintains ... to protect what is actually at risk - the motor.

    All electronics have a power supply whose job is to stablize power even when that power can damage a refrigerator's motor. Only hysteria claims blackouts damage electronics. Get over it. Stop worrying about myths invented by others who do not know how electricity works. Who only know because they fear.

    Other anomalies exist. Some require other solutions. But each anomaly cited here is only a threat to electric motors and is ideal power for electronics. Blackouts damage no hardware. But again, if a blackout is destructive, then one can identify the part (transistor, resistor, switch, etc) damaged by a blackout. Nobody does for one simple reason. Only damage is to a emotional psyche - that entertains mythical fears.

    Another mentions direct lightning strikes. A direct strike to AC wires far down the street is a direct strike to every appliance in a house. How often do such transients exist? Typically once every seven years. A numbers that can vary significantly in every town and that is even defined by geology. That is a different topic for a different anomaly that requires a completely different solution.

  12. #9
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    Los lobos,

    For a smal fridges use a Fridge and or freezers protecter- these are availalbe a La Serena for 580 RD$ - at least they are in Puerto Plata - these have high , low , sart up delay of 3 minutes and a limited amount of "Spike " protection which damages electronics here in the DR. These are useful for small fridges that have very limited electronics and the low voltage cut-off prevents motor burn out on low voltages when the compressor tries to restart.
    these are also useful on larger more modern fridges but many now have these features built in to the electronics. Spike protections is still a usefull thing to add and the easiest way is a plug in unit at the outlets. Get one with about 500 to 800 joules capability to absorb "Spikes"

    Hope that helps - we will try to get the name of the device next time we go to La Serena!

    Olly and the Team

  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by westom View Post
    Ideal voltage for all electronics is even when incandescent bulbs dim to 50% intensity. When voltage goes lower, then electronics simply power off. Where is this 'frying' from a low voltage? Identify a part that is damaged by low voltage? No body can for one simple reason. Fears also proved Martians were invading Browns Mills.

    Low voltage damages no electronics. But low voltage can harm electric motors. Voltage variation is quite normal for electronics. But is a threat to motors. So the utility cuts off power if voltage cannot be maintains ... to protect what is actually at risk - the motor.

    All electronics have a power supply whose job is to stablize power even when that power can damage a refrigerator's motor. Only hysteria claims blackouts damage electronics. Get over it. Stop worrying about myths invented by others who do not know how electricity works. Who only know because they fear.

    Other anomalies exist. Some require other solutions. But each anomaly cited here is only a threat to electric motors and is ideal power for electronics. Blackouts damage no hardware. But again, if a blackout is destructive, then one can identify the part (transistor, resistor, switch, etc) damaged by a blackout. Nobody does for one simple reason. Only damage is to a emotional psyche - that entertains mythical fears.

    Another mentions direct lightning strikes. A direct strike to AC wires far down the street is a direct strike to every appliance in a house. How often do such transients exist? Typically once every seven years. A numbers that can vary significantly in every town and that is even defined by geology. That is a different topic for a different anomaly that requires a completely different solution.
    Seems the martians have visited the dr then.........

    Please explain to us why once ure regulator is installed there are no more problems with the fridge....

    And of course it helps to have a working fridge....... the regulator sort of stabilises the electricity...... without the fridge doesnt work, with it does...... dont need to know more than that.

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