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Thread: White children in the DR

  1. #1
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    Question White children in the DR

    OK, I need some serious input. My wife and I have no problems assimilating to a foreign culture. But, I have a couple of boys that are white as white can be. We're talking blue eyes, blond hair, and American upbringing.

    How are Anglo kids treated by the DR children? Adults? Teachers?

    Here in my town, Denver, we are a minority. The hispanic culture here is significant. We have carnecerias, panaderias, lavanderias, in my zone. Our schools are bilingual. So my kids understand somewhat.

    But hispanic children here are harsh and sometimes nasty (and were talking grade school level). Middle school is a gang breeding ground, with plenty of fights and scuffles over chicas, drugs, and turf. My "Cracker Boys" have quite a challenge. Many families don't speak enlgish because they don't have to. At the same time, their income levels suffer.

    I know this hatred is bred at home, by family and friends, for the most part. Does this happen there as well. Do kids get beat up for being white?

  2. #2
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    There are lots of white, blonde, blue-eyed Dominican children. Note that over the years there has been lots of inter-marrying of different cultures with Dominicans. If you put your child in one of the upscale English or bilingual schools, or even the upscale Spanish-speaking schools, they will just be one of many. Unless your children are albinos, which definitely would make them different and noticeable, you should have none of the problems you mention having in Denver.

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    Smile toe heads

    We were 7 kids, ages 13 and under. Blonde hair, blue eyes, fair skin and the like. We went to private Dominican schools and met kids of many different shades. There were a few light hair/skinned Dominicans there. I feel we were accepted both in school and in the neighborhood. The key will be learning Spanish which should happen quickly. At age 13, after one month of playing in our street with the rest of the kids, I was understanding and making embarrasing grammatical mistakes in Spanish. In school they were easy on me. I was expected to know the math and sciences (duh) But by the end of the year, I was doing memorization, just like everybody else. Fortunately, after one year, my Spanish was pretty good. Theirs will be too. The kids will be called "rubio" which means fair hair/skinned person. Best of luck to you.

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    Its been a long time since I grew up in the DR but I say ditto to MKOHN and Delores' statements. While I attended the Carol Morgan School which was primarily an upper Class Dominican/middle to upper class American school, I had friends that attended Catholic schools which were predominately Dominican with classes in Spanish. They were always well treated and in fact learned Spanish faster thah I did and made lifelong friends. Most of my friends from Carol Morgan are now dispered all over the world and we lost contact.

    BTW, what part of Denver are you in. I'm down in the Springs.

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    Thumbs up

    I have known many gringo families in Sosua over the years and their children seem very well-adjusted, mingling and playing with children from many cultures. Dominicans treat children well no matter what their colour or ethnic background.

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    Cool

    This is very interesting and enticing.

    It's interesting that a "developing nation" like the DR has superior integration to that of the US. I believe that common language is the key.

    It's also interesting that the DR segments its neighborhoods based on social (monetary) status. Here in my town, different races segregate themselves...blacks to the east, hispanics to the west, and whites to the south, regardless of income (except for the rich rich rich who head for the suburbs).

    It's enticing because I'm getting pretty sick of the hispanic gangs in my zone tagging and vandalizing Asian stores because they're "invading our barrio". Then the Asian gangs hit back. And when the whites hang out together, they call them "supremacists". Totally screwed up. Time to turn up the heat on this "melting pot" called the US.

    And it's not about income. Houses here in my zone go for RD$2,500,000 to RD$3,500,000.

    And Jefe, FYI I live in southwest Denver, sort of close to Englewood.

    Thanks, all, for your kind input. Can't wait to blow this place.

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    I may not be very qualified at saying anything regarding this subject, but here I go sticking my neck out (well, not really):

    My impression as a white North European is that there are no severe racial tensions, much less hatred, in the Dominican Republic, if any at all. There is no "us" vs. "them". My personal experience stems from the Cibao region in the North Western part of the country, things might be different elsewhere. But your kids will in all likelihood be received as friends and treated as equals, at least if they behave well themselves and don't put on any airs of being "better" than the rest, and so on and so forth. They might be exposed to some degree of friendly curiosity at most.
    Last edited by Paulino; 01-04-2002 at 09:26 AM.

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    Paulino,
    Try to get a black Dominican Man in one of SD's better Discos. It ain't gonna happen.
    As long as the econonmy is fairly healthy and people have food everything will appear fine. But if the economy goes south....Watch out.
    I can give you an example from experience. Back in 84(or was it 85?) I was Taking my car to my mechanic to get some work done on it. It was the Monday after Easter and during easter week the Gov. announce major price hikes on basic foods. Well at 7:00 am that day I drove right into the middle of a riot. I started to head for my mechanic's shop for safety and was met with rocks and molotov Cocktails. I turned my car around and ran the gauntlet out of there. Dodging rocks and jumping burning tires, The last thing I saw was my Mechanic in my rear view mirror tossing a Molotov Cocktail in my Direction.(I got him back later)this is the same Mechanic that I shared beers with only weeks before.
    Trust me. There is no love loss between the haves and the jealous, havenots!

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    Default Pollyanna doesn't live here any more.

    From frequent trips over the last two + years, I have concluded that the DR is a very unique place. I lived in West Africa for two years many years ago, have travelled in the Caribbean extensively, and the rest of this hemisphere quite a bit. I lived in Manhattan for over fifteen years.

    The Dominican people are among the most gracious and warmest people I have met anywhere--yet there is the indisputable legacy of racism personified by Trujillo's "ethnic cleansing" of Haitians in the 1930's. It would be an important part of your preparation for relocation to read about that.

    You probably won't notice racism much--I didn't--but wait until a taxi driver wants to take you into the Haitian neighborhoods to show you how "they" live.

    I am not surprised by the post about the inability of Black Dominicans to gain entree in certain places, though I can only imagine it, having not witnessed it.

    The haves vs have-nots situation is a universal powderkeg everywhere on earth and it's only the length of the fuse that's at issue. So long as things are relatively okay for hardworking Dominicans, the Anglo transplant will be fine. So will the wealthier Dominican.

    But if the stuff hits the fan, just like anywhere on earth--LA riots, etc.--the have-not's will rise up.

    Just do your best to contribute to the overall success of the country when you get here and let's all hope the trickle down effect actually works here. The people most certainly deserve it--all the people.

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    Default Haitians

    I don't think the hatred of Haitians has anything to do with race. As you will see, there are black Dominicans as well as light to white skinned Haitians (altho more in the Upper Class). This hatred goes back to the divided nature of the country and the poverty of Haiti. The French arriveed after the Spanish so they "stole" the land in Haiti. Then the Haitians invaded and took over the DR. After the DR returned to being free the Haitians have always been looked down upon, a condition which in many ways they brought on themselves thru illegal immigration and thru their choices in leadership. They have a country that has been and probably still is being plundered by their leadership...

    Now, in order to survive they are like the wetbacks in the US, coming across the border and providing cheap labor.

    The hatred of Haitians, in my opinion is based on politics and economics, not racism.

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