Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default spanish language schools

    Would like some information on how to contact spanish language schools in the DR. Thank you.
    Last edited by strasser; 01-13-2002 at 09:51 PM.

  2. #2
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    359
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default language school

    First of all, be warned! Truly learning Spanish is a very complex, frustrating and difficult opportunity-even for the adult who happens to be both young and smart. It CANNOT be done in 6 months. Frankly, it takes a lifetime to master, and there are numerous expats who have lived here for years with barely the ability to communicate. Also, be warned that many Dominicans speak a very informal "loose" Spanish that can be very difficult for the expat to understand. I had the opportunity to spend a year studying Spanish in Costa Rica before coming here under an excellent system of tutors. That being said, there is a lady here who, I believe, has an excellent language school(CEIC) on the Northwest side of the city. Her name is Marta and her phone number is 809-560-4136. I believe that she would be fair in charging for the quality of education delivered.

  3. #3
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    Thumbs down Learning Spanish

    Excuse me Ihtown,
    Sorry to inform you, but as far as learning Spanish is concerned, you are wrong.
    You speak as though Spanish is the hardest language in the world. NOT! English is the hardest language. Why? Because the spelling of most words have no logical pattern. Words such as weigh and way, no and know, pitcher and picture, etc. are just a few examples of the difficulty of the English language. Grammar and punctuation rules are another story. Even most native English speakers never completely master the English language. My husband a Puerto Rican speaks, reads, and writes English well enough to be considered "bilingual." Although he speaks English all day everyday at his job for two decades, he still does not have full command of the language. Speaking of Spanish, do you really and truly believe Dominicanos speak true Spanish? Of course they don't! Look up a word like "chi chi" in a true Spanish dictionary, it's not there! Why? Because that word, along with many other so-called Spanish words used only in the DR is NOT Spanish. Hello!
    Back to learning Spanish, it absolutely DOES NOT TAKE A LIFETIME TO MASTER! I only lived and worked in Puerto Rico for 1 1/2 years, and off and on self-taught myself Spanish, not to mention having been married to a Puerto Rican (native Spanish speaking) for 10 years, and I practically have Spanish mastered. IT DID NOT TAKE ME A LIFETIME! Maybe it takes a Dominicano a lifetime, but someone who applies themselves and has the aptitude IT DOES NOT! So stop scaring people with false information!

  4. #4
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    649
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    When I first went to the Dominican Republic, I remarked about how hard it was for me to completely understand conversations being overheard (not being slowed or annunciated for my benefit).

    I continued, "... and I have studied Spanish formally in Junior High, High School, and at the University and I was the best student in every class, got staight A's, acted in Spanish plays, and was the Spanish Scrabble Champion at my high school. So if I have trouble, imagine how hard it must be for everybody else."

    A young Dominican countered that she spent 3 months with her boyfriend living in Germany, that she picked up German in that short time, and that I must just be "slow". It's easy.

    Of course I knew I wasn't "slow" and I knew where I stood in relation to other language students.

    The point is, some would say I'm fluent, others would say not even close. It all depends on what each person believes is meant by "fluent", "master", etc. Hell, I'm an educated man and I can't even understand some AMERICANS the way they speak "English".

    By the way, while I still cannot understand some Dominicans, I think I speak better "Spanish" than most of them. Now, define "better".

    Nothing beats immersion. Nothing. School gives a good foundation.

    I think 6 months of combination immersion and school will have just about anybody well on their way to being at least "conversational" in Spanish.

    Most expats I know can hardly speak Spanish, despite living in the DR for 10 years. That's because they all hang out with each other. That's why even the ones that LIVE in the Dominican Republic often know so little about what is what. They know only what they tell each other, the blind leading the blind.

    It's not uncommon for someone to come visit a city and in 1 week, know more about the city than some people that have lived there all their lives but don't get out much. For example, I was amazed to meet people that lived in NJ near NYC all their lives and had never been to Manhattan!

  5. #5
    Goddess
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    3,580
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Learning Spanish

    Good to have another Spanish expert in the board.

    prcafe1, I believe that Ihtown's reply couldn't be truer. I don't think anyone can learn Spanish (or any other language for that matter) in 6 months. Those were his words and I completely agree. Learning the spelling is never as important as it is learning grammar, vocabulary and pronounciation (the true making of a language IMHO). Spanish grammar is a nightmare, take it from me, it is my mother's tongue. For someone that speaks another Latin-rooted language it would be a little easier, the grammar tends to be similar, but it does not make it easy. Many people live in a Spanish speaking country for years and are still struggling with Spanish grammar.

    And yes, we Dominicans use a lot of words that only we know, but it also happens absolutely everywhere. Sometimes when I speak to Spaniards I feel like grabbing a dictionary. For example, Puerto Ricans say zambo where Dominicans say gambao. None of these words are in the Dictionary published by the Royal Academy of the Spanish Language. First time I heard the word from a Puerto Rican I thought it was an insult.

    So, you lived in PR for 11/2 years, you have lived with a Spanish speaking person for 10 yrs. After all that I would expect any half-witted person to learn the language. That doesn't sound anywhere like 6 months. BTW, how are your Spanish writing abbilities? I would expect that you have also mastered that by now.

    Every language has its beauty, and learning how to say "żme puede traer una cerveza?" or some such does not consitute speaking a language. I consider myself half-done with my English now, and I started studying English 22 yrs. ago and haven't finished yet. Let me tell you something else, I've studied 3 languages other than my own not to say that I learnt them all. Of all 4, I consider English a piece of cake.
    Last edited by Pib; 01-09-2002 at 06:59 PM.

  6. #6
    Grande Pollo en Boca Chica
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    4,796
    Post Thanks / Like

    Lightbulb An Answer To Your Actual Point vs. an Argument

    While the various answers you did get may be of interest as to the effectiveness you can try this site which offers in home Spanish training, some quite intensive, one-on-one, etc., and in Sto. Domingo as well and many other countries.

    [url]http://www.amerispan.com/study_spanish/

  7. #7
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    9
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Another Spanish school option

    You might also try Community Service Alliance, located in Santo Domingo. They offer personalized programs adjusted to meet your needs. You also have the opportunity to get involved in visits to the Colonial Zone and other community service activities, if you are interested. You can read more at Community Service Alliance - CSADR

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •