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  1. #1
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    Default Here's an upbeat cheery article

    DOMINICAN PEOPLE KNOW HAPPINESS ON THE SCENE | Dominican Republic

    We don't get much like this. I post in full knowledge that the gimlet-eyed among us (you know who you are!) will swiftly and vociferously jack the thread.

    I tried. (sigh). Much love, Pollyanna

  2. #2
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    My opinions are not far from the article so thanks for posting.

    But I avoid certain places and try and find a life away from expats and with Dominicans. And resort areas are far from ideal to live so......but I do like the fringes of Las Terrenas.

  3. #3
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    While I don't disagree with the tone of the article I can say it has been my experience that many Dominicans are bit with the keeping up with the Jones syndrome; jealousy of another's good fortune is very evident. A common theme will be that someone is successful because they are lucky, not because they worked their ass off and made wide decisions. Of course, it is not just Dominicans that think that way.

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  5. #4
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    My point in posting it was that I do so agree with the many, many unexpected and totally sincere kindnesses I have received from so many Dominicans.

    I lived here the first time 30 years ago and it was a totally different society then. When I came back 3 years ago, I was astonished by the changes, not only in Sosua (which broke my heart) but in the country in general. By and large, it doesn't feel as if most of the changes were for the better. Yes, it's a good thing that most places have electricity, however hit or miss, bc in the 1980s, there were huge swaths of the country without it. I think health care has improved, and whether tourism is good or bad, it has certainly brought significantly more capital into the country.

    It's a developing country, not exactly Third World, but sort of 2.5. The technology explosion has opened the world and many people are being exposed to things they never knew they even wanted because they didn't even know about them. It will be a long time and a seismic cultural shift for Latin America to deal with the world the way the First World does, and maybe it doesn't need to.

    I just keep coming back to how kind so many Dominicans are, to each other and to complete strangers.

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  7. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meemselle View Post
    DOMINICAN PEOPLE KNOW HAPPINESS ON THE SCENE | Dominican Republic

    We don't get much like this. I post in full knowledge that the gimlet-eyed among us (you know who you are!) will swiftly and vociferously jack the thread.

    I tried. (sigh). Much love, Pollyanna
    The author of this article is very fortunate to have this experience in the DR. Yes, most of us are spoiled as hell in North America. It comes down to what you are used to in your daily life. It is very difficult to give up technology once you have programmed yourself to rely upon it. Many in the DR, especially outside of the larger city areas, do not have the means for anything more than a simple, uncomplicated life. Being tied to possesions can be a blessing and a curse. I for one am too old to give up my "gringo" ways.

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  9. #6
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    She must live with Bob!!!!!!
    The dream DR where EVERYTHING is "Happy-Happy-Happy" all the time!!!!

    CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC

  10. #7
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    I agree that Dominicans smile more than for example europeans, but I don't know if that's genuine happiness.

    I don't find that Dominicans are or have truer friends than Europeans.

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  12. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Criss Colon View Post
    She must live with Bob!!!!!!
    The dream DR where EVERYTHING is "Happy-Happy-Happy" all the time!!!!

    CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
    Ah..Jealousy rears it's ugly head.

  13. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Criss Colon View Post
    She must live with Bob!!!!!!
    The dream DR where EVERYTHING is "Happy-Happy-Happy" all the time!!!!

    CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC
    Now THERE is the grouchy CC that I know. What did you do with the other guy who's been using your computer?

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  15. #10
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    i have no idea what is considered to be happiness, because nobody has defined it to my satisfaction. whenever people from North America and Europe go to third world countries, most of which are mired in poverty and deprivation, they all have the same response....oh, they have so little, yet they smile so much. so, you look at the most recent tabulations of international mirth and glee, and all the top countries are Latin American countries, which are marked by poverty, suffering, and inequality. but the people smile, just like most of the Haitians i say hello to in my daily rounds.

    for some of you Euromericans out there, ponder this more carefully. it is culture you are looking at, whch has nothing to do with happiness. if i walk on the malecon, and i come across a Euro or North American, the chances of him saying good morning is 5 percent. every Dominican will say buen dia. it is custom. the same happens when they get on public transport. buenas tardes a todos. foreigners just sit still with no acknowledgement of others. no smile, no nothing.

    that does not mean that the guy who says hello is happier. i canīt see how a guy who does not know where the next meal is coming from, and who just had his electricity supended is happy just because he smiles and says how do you do.

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