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  1. #1
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    Default Will Cuba opening its doors to USA affect DR tourism ?

    I understand most people have had access to Cuba except us " gringos". But with the embargo lifted.... Cuba is on the way to have unprecedented investement and growth.
    To many of us its almost like a whole new , formerly forbidden world.

    Will this affect tourism in the carribean i.e. DR ??

  2. #2
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    Sure will, in two ways:

    1) Dominicans will need to become better and more proficient at growing mint
    2) The Mojitos available here should be better. If not, there is no future for DR tourism.

  3. #3
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    In the short term, yes. It virgin territory for a lot and curiosity will bring in a lot of Caribbean tourists. For the sex tourists, they will flock to the "new" destination with cheaper prices.

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  5. #4
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    DR is probably one of the better prepared for the Cuban competition. The DR isn't as dependent on the US market as some nearby islands (Puerto Rico, Bahamas, Jamaica; Cancun -not an island, but a major player in Caribbean tourism-, Aruba, and most of the other islands all depend on American tourists for well over 80% of their visitors, in many cases well over 90%). The has been competing with Cuba for the Canadian/Latin American/European markets and it has done very well.

    The influx of American tourists might decrease for the DR (and across the Caribbean) as they head for Cuba instead, but they will displace many Canadian/Latin American/European tourists that vacation in Cuba. This displaced group is used to mainly European AI chains (the European AI chains in Cuba are the same players in the DR), and the DR is the best prepared to accommodate that group. DR has the hotel chains they know and trust, the flights connections to their airports (Punta Cana has the most flights to Europe of any Latin American airport and most major Canadian cities have direct flights too), the trained hotel staff that speaks their languages and/or knows the treatment they are used to, etc.

    If we take Puerto Rico as an example. They overwhelmingly depend on American from the eastern seaboard. They hardly have flights to Europe, hotel chains are overwhelmingly American and mostly non-AI. Puerto Rican staff in most of their hotels probably understand English and that's it as far as non-native languages. There is no way PR can get ready in time for the Cuban competition, because once Americans start to head more towards Cuban than PR, they are going to have a hard time attracting the hoards of Europeans/Canadians/Latin Americans displaced from Cuba. Not many Russians, Germans, Italians, French are going to visit PR if there are no or too few direct flights when just across the Mona Passage thousands of Europeans from all over Europe arrive every single day in Punta Cana.

    Jamaica faces a similar dilemma as PR, but at least Jamaica has the AI resorts even if only a few of the European chains. But they also face severe restrictions due to sparse flights to Europe/Latin America and their hotel workforce is overwhelmingly trained to cater to American quirks and nonsense which doesn't always rubs well with Europeans. Another negative for Jamaica is that its not a Latin country while DR is probably the closest thing to a Cuba without being in Cuba. While many people don't care where their resort is, a lot of people that travel to Cuba do so also because it is a Latin/Hispanic place with the vibe to go along with that. People that like to listen to Spanish/Latin American music by the pool might not get in their vacation mood listening to reggae or hip hop or whatever is not Latin.

    Point is that DR is much better prepared than most of the Caribbean.

    Cuba also needs to Americanize its hotel offerings. Americans are very picky and whiny people. Europeans take it as part of the experience when they have to eat in open air restaurants with the breeze soothing their skins, etc. That same scene is a nightmare for Americans, because most will not feel comfortable if there's no A/C, and the they will complain about the odd bug that flies through, get annoyed at the slower pace of things, and a very long whiny and annoying etc.
    Last edited by NALs; 07-28-2015 at 09:19 PM.

    Polls Forum Moderator

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  7. #5
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    And if there is obvious poverty in Cuba, that will dissuade Americans from visiting just like it dissuades Americans from visiting the DR with the exception of the cruises that go nowhere otherwise known as AIs.

    No matter what, the DR should drop its ridiculous airport and air fuel taxes to grab more tourists.

  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by NALs View Post
    DR is probably one of the better prepared for the Cuban competition. The DR isn't as dependent on the US market as some nearby islands (Puerto Rico, Bahamas, Jamaica; Cancun -not an island, but a major player in Caribbean tourism-, Aruba, and most of the other islands all depend on American tourists for well over 80% of their visitors, in many cases well over 90%). The has been competing with Cuba for the Canadian/Latin American/European markets and it has done very well.

    The influx of American tourists might decrease for the DR (and across the Caribbean) as they head for Cuba instead, but they will displace many Canadian/Latin American/European tourists that vacation in Cuba. This displaced group is used to mainly European AI chains (the European AI chains in Cuba are the same players in the DR), and the DR is the best prepared to accommodate that group. DR has the hotel chains they know and trust, the flights connections to their airports (Punta Cana has the most flights to Europe of any Latin American airport and most major Canadian cities have direct flights too), the trained hotel staff that speaks their languages and/or knows the treatment they are used to, etc.

    If we take Puerto Rico as an example. They overwhelmingly depend on American from the eastern seaboard. They hardly have flights to Europe, hotel chains are overwhelmingly American and mostly non-AI. Puerto Rican staff in most of their hotels probably understand English and that's it as far as non-native languages. There is no way PR can get ready in time for the Cuban competition, because once Americans start to head more towards Cuban than PR, they are going to have a hard time attracting the hoards of Europeans/Canadians/Latin Americans displaced from Cuba. Not many Russians, Germans, Italians, French are going to visit PR if there are no or too few direct flights when just across the Mona Passage thousands of Europeans from all over Europe arrive every single day in Punta Cana.

    Jamaica faces a similar dilemma as PR, but at least Jamaica has the AI resorts even if only a few of the European chains. But they also face severe restrictions due to sparse flights to Europe/Latin America and their hotel workforce is overwhelmingly trained to cater to American quirks and nonsense which doesn't always rubs well with Europeans. Another negative for Jamaica is that its not a Latin country while DR is probably the closest thing to a Cuba without being in Cuba. While many people don't care where their resort is, a lot of people that travel to Cuba do so also because it is a Latin/Hispanic place with the vibe to go along with that. People that like to listen to Spanish/Latin American music by the pool might not get in their vacation mood listening to reggae or hip hop or whatever is not Latin.

    Point is that DR is much better prepared than most of the Caribbean.

    Cuba also needs to Americanize its hotel offerings. Americans are very picky and whiny people. Europeans take it as part of the experience when they have to eat in open air restaurants with the breeze soothing their skins, etc. That same scene is a nightmare for Americans, because most will not feel comfortable if there's no A/C, and the they will complain about the odd bug that flies through, get annoyed at the slower pace of things, and a very long whiny and annoying etc.
    NALS, the question is not complicated, and does not need overthought analysis. it asks if the DR will be affected by the US thaw with Cuba. the answer is a simple yes.

    the product is different, and new. people like new. people want new. the Dominican Republic, from a tourism standpoint, is Punta Cana. it is an all inclusive vacation plantation model. Cuba is a brand...people are not going to go to Cuba to huddle together in an all inclusive. they want to see the land that time forgot. they want to see Havana. they want to see the Tropicana, and shows like that. they want to see real high quality music concerts. they want to see 55 Chey Belairs driving on cobblestone streets.

    they will not be going to Havana to eat till they puke.

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  10. #7
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    Just as i read in a New York Times article, americans might be ready for Cuba, but Cuba aint ready for americans, so, no, at least not for now...

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  12. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mm530 View Post
    I understand most people have had access to Cuba except us " gringos". But with the embargo lifted.... Cuba is on the way to have unprecedented investement and growth.
    To many of us its almost like a whole new , formerly forbidden world.

    Will this affect tourism in the carribean i.e. DR ??
    The embargo has not yet been lifted, and the Communist party of Cuba is not going to allow free rein to Americans or American companies. Buyer beware are words to remember for anyone or any company investing in Cuba.

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  14. #9
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    The Americans will flock to Cuba, prices there will increase !

    The DR may see less American tourist.....

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  16. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob saunders View Post
    Buyer beware are words to remember for anyone or any company investing in Cuba.
    Same with the DR.

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