Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34
  1. #1
    Regular
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    37
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Why You Don't See A Lot Of Halloween Here In The DR...

    After 20+ years in the country I've noticed that Halloween is not something you will see a lot here, especially in the less touristy areas. I asked around with locals and came up with an interesting explanation, and posted an article about it on my blog.

    Basically, summing up the article so you don't necessarily have to read it, there are two reasons.

    1. National Pride. It's perceived as a strictly US holiday, so the more patriotic stay away from it. That's in part due to the anti-American-meddling sentiments that still do exist here.

    2. It's considered Demonic. 'Nuff said. Old argument.

    But still, there seems to be a rise in more and more celebrating it. Has anyone else noticed that? Any thoughts on that?
    Last edited by AlecCorday; 10-31-2015 at 05:19 PM.

  2. #2
    Banned
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    34,568
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AlecCorday View Post
    After 20+ years in the country I've noticed that Halloween is not something you will see a lot here, especially in the less touristy areas. I asked around with locals and came up with an interesting explanation, and posted an article about it on my blog.

    Basically, summing up the article so you don't necessarily have to read it, there are two reasons.

    1. National Pride. It's perceived as a strictly US holiday, so the more patriotic stay away from it. That's in part due to the anti-American-meddling sentiments that still do exist here.

    2. It's considered Demonic. 'Nuff said. Old argument.

    But still, there seems to be a rise in more and more celebrating it. Has anyone else noticed that? Any thoughts on that?
    i am bewildered that you started this thread. Halloween is an American holiday. i see no reason why Dominicans should care less.

  3. Likes AlecCorday, granca, drstock liked this post
    Dislikes yacht chef disliked this post
  4. #3
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,996
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm still at a loss as to why some countries still send their children out to basically beg for candy one night per year and the rest of the year they beat into their little heads DO NOT TAKE CANDY FROM STRANGERS.
    Dumbest thing going but I guess the economy benefits.

  5. Likes AlecCorday liked this post
  6. #4
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    700
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Halloween if definitely NOT an American Holiday...they just commercialized it:
    In England, from the medieval period, up until the 1930s, people practiced the Christian custom of souling on Halloween, which involved groups of soulers, both Protestant and Catholic, going from parish to parish, begging the rich for soul cakes, in exchange for praying for the souls of the givers and their friends.In Scotland and Ireland, guising – children disguised in costume going from door to door for food or coins – is a traditional Halloween custom, and is recorded in Scotland at Halloween in 1895 where masqueraders in disguise carrying lanterns made out of scooped out turnips, visit homes to be rewarded with cakes, fruit and money.The practice of guising at Halloween in North America is first recorded in 1911, where a newspaper in Kingston, Ontario reported children going "guising" around the neighborhood.

    Souling was a Christian practice carried out in many English towns on Halloween and Christmas.
    American historian and author Ruth Edna Kelley of Massachusetts wrote the first book length history of Halloween in the US; The Book of Hallowe'en (1919), and references souling in the chapter "Hallowe'en in America".In her book, Kelley touches on customs that arrived from across the Atlantic; "Americans have fostered them, and are making this an occasion something like what it must have been in its best days overseas. All Halloween customs in the United States are borrowed directly or adapted from those of other countries

  7. #5
    Silver
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    2,131
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Definitely not just an american holiday. I have a friend in Columbia, and her and her kiddo are going whole hog.

    Myself, I bought apples, should the rugrats come banging on my door. GF thinks I am hombre malo.

  8. #6
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    252
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by melphis View Post
    I'm still at a loss as to why some countries still send their children out to basically beg for candy one night per year and the rest of the year they beat into their little heads DO NOT TAKE CANDY FROM STRANGERS.
    Dumbest thing going but I guess the economy benefits.
    Ohhh it's true…. but as a child I LOVED Hallowe'en. More than Christmas, more than birthdays….
    In Canada, you needed to make sure a parka fit under your costume, but going door-to-door and getting a PILLOWCASE full of candy…. wow!!!!!!!
    Then, coming home, having your mother check for razor blades and opened packages….. lol….. well, anyway I thought it was just great. Sorting through all the candy, saving the lame ones and gorging on the good ones, resulting in a dizzying sugar high….
    Maybe it's one of those things you have to grow up with to appreciate. Like marmite.

  9. Likes AlecCorday, westcan liked this post
  10. #7
    Silver
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    2,958
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Gogon, you surprised me on that one.

    i was thinking the same thing about halloween in DR and whether or not it is becoming part of the global cultural export available for purchase. manufactured in China, of course.

    Day of the dead was a purely mexican holiday. It too has been commercialized and has extended far beyond the borders of mexico. people enjoy the aesthetic, but it's pretty much just mexicans who go to the cemetary, have lunch, clean the place up and decorate.

    isn't halloween an opportunity to break out those weird KKK and Aryan costumes one occasionally sees popping up?

  11. Likes AlecCorday, jbars liked this post
  12. #8
    Silver
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    2,032
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    All saints or 'Hallowed Eve' is a tradition going back even before I was born...

    As usual..
    It has been commercialised 1000% by US Big Business and is infecting countries far afield from its origins.

    It really has to be one of the sorriest excuses for dressing up and having a party that one can imagine but ...Hey!

    Any excuse for a party is good.

    Even when it involves sending kids out as extortion agents........

  13. Likes AlecCorday, Goll liked this post
  14. #9
    Gold
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    6,967
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eleutheria View Post
    Like marmite.
    Anyone who admits to liking marmite is lying...
    Anyone who admits to liking malta is lying...{compulsory DR reference}

  15. #10
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    12,320
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Most people in the barrio don't have the money to buy/make the costumes and to buy the candy to hand out. Birthdays, Christmas and Tres Reyes are more important in the DR

  16. Likes Commander Ooh La La, USN liked this post
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •