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  1. #1
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    Default Bank/Casa de Cambo won't take torn $100 bill

    Quite interesting. I tried to deposit some dollars in bank and the teller would not accept one of the $100 bills. I thought she said because it was torn. I thought maybe it had a small tear - I really did not see the problem while in the bank. Later I looked and not only had it been torn in half, but it was taped back together. It came from a U.S. bank so I am fairly sure it is real.

    In U.S., if taped back together and serial numbers on both halves match, not a problem. They will take it anywhere, bank, store, etc. Not here. We even tried three casas de cambio.

    I thought maybe one of them would offer maybe 3.000 pesos for defective bill - but no. None would take it.

    I was not going to take less than the exchange rate, I just thought some entrepreneurial person might offer less.

    Always something new here....

  2. #2
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    In the check cashing business, that's called 'Mud Money'

    It goes back to the bank in a special pouch.. separate deposit.

    Take that bill back to the US.... it may never float here

  3. #3
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    agree with ww. No one will touch it here even if its a small tear. Taped together is out of the question. Just another of those strange quirks about the DR. I suspect that its related to a fear of counterfeit. You will end up bringing the bill back to the US where anyone will take it.

  4. #4
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    It's also illegal to write on a bill here in the D.R.

    Be careful of what bills you get in change, you may have a problem getting rid of them it they are torn or written upon. My wife had a 100 peso note the other day and it was coming apart, the clerk at the store refused to take it.

    Stay Calm, The Moderator is Here

  5. #5
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    Yes, I will just take it back to U.S. I know they will take it there. It came from the bank, in fact.

    Here, they would not even take it at the bank because she saw it had been torn. I guess you mean if somehow it gets by the person at store, they put it in special pouch... Maybe I should try passing it at a bar : )

  6. #6
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    They changed the $100 bills last year and added a bunch of anti-counterfeiting features. I never take anything larger than a $50 bill, as a lot of places will not take a $100.
    I have passed a carefully taped $20 bill before, but it was not torn in two. Caribe Express will not change torn US money. I suspect that this is because they often weigh the bills to verify the count and several taped bills might give a lower count because of the added weight of the tape.

    I find it amazing that I have used ATM machines for the past 25 years and I have never gotten anything but the accurate count.

  7. #7
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    Slightly different topic:

    I pay with 2000 peso and/or 1000 peso bills in La Sirena every week and the checkout person always examines each one quite carefully. Yet it is extremely rare for anyone in a bar or restaurant to give them even a cursory glance. Odd, because in La Sirena there is bright lighting and I have been identified by my Siremas card. Other locations may be quite dark and with distractions, so much easier to pass a counterfeit bill.

    Returning from Sosua to Pto Pta today by publico, a Haitian passenger paid with a 1000 peso bill. Naturally this sparked an initial protest by the driver which morphed into a trip-long, and ultimately good-natured, discussion about prices in the two countries, but what struck me was the driver did not examine the note at all, despite the unusual circumstances, but put it straight into his wallet.

    I would think the Ramos family could afford to lose 1000 pesos more than a publico driver. Perhaps that is why they are rich and he (prsumably) is not?

  8. #8
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    Any mark or tear on a bill in this country is a problem. Luckily when it is US currency, you can always use it in the US.

  9. #9
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    The cashier might well have been told that she will be charged for any money lost if she takes a counterfeit bill. The guagua driver can always give it to the next guy with a $2000 peso note.
    I have noticed that checkout clerks always carefully and slowly examine every bill.

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  11. #10
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    I tried paying for the publico car here in Santiago with a torn 20 peso note but he would not accept it.
    Ended up having to pay him with a larger note. I still have the 20 peso note, not a huge loss but definitely a reminder to pay closer attention to my change for now on.

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