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Thread: Spanish grammar

  1. #21
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    Default The subjunctive in newspaper articles



    13 Dic, 2016 | Caracas. La temporada 2016 de Wilson Ramos tuvo un lamentable final debido a una operación para reparar distintos problemas en su rodilla derecha. Eso evitó que jugara en la postemporada con los Nacionales de Washington y que consiguiera las ofertas que merecía en la agencia libre.

    Sin embargo, el careta firmó un contrato por dos temporadas con los Rays de Tampa Bay, y aunque posiblemente no se encuentre en el día inaugural, sí apunta a perder menos tiempo del que se esperaba.

    “Con el ritmo que va mi rehabilitación, espero estar disponible para el equipo tomando turnos como bateador designado, desde principio de mayo”, expresó Wilson Ramos en nota publicada por el diario deportivo Meridiano. “Las personas que están haciendo mi terapia, están realmente impresionados”.

    El carabobeño ha publicado videos en su cuenta de Instagram haciendo trabajo físico y fortaleciendo sus piernas para la temporada. Ahí, Wilson Ramos comentaba que su prepara para “estar detrás del plato pronto”, sin embargo, no se espera que Tampa Bay lo use como receptor en los primeros meses.

    http://www.elsoldemargarita.com.ve/posts/post/id:181002

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  3. #22
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    Los Nacionales de Washington, pero los Rays(?) de Tampa Bay

    ¿Por qué no los Mantarrayas de Tampa Bay?

  4. #23
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    Hola Lucifer,

    Good observation. If you do formal translation studies in Spanish (which I have) you will learn that there is some leeway with regards to translation and especially names and titles. Los Rays de Tampa Bay is acceptable. The journalist (probably) did not know if there is an official name in Spanish as well if he’s not familiar with what the name Rays refers to then he can’t assume it refers to the fish. How does he know it may refer to a ray of light? Instead of making an incorrect translation, he left the original English name of the team which is considered correct in translation rather than translate it incorrectly.

    Cosa aparte Wilson Ramos es un buen receptor no creo que Los Rays de Tampa Bay sea un buen equipo para él.




    -MP.
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  5. #24
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    Thanks. That's good to know.

    And I would love to have some formal translation training, especially in legal documents. Most programs here in Texas colleges concentrate on literary works. Lately, I've been reading translation material and instructions from Spain.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    Hola Lucifer,

    Good observation. If you do formal translation studies in Spanish (which I have) you will learn that there is some leeway with regards to translation and especially names and titles. Los Rays de Tampa Bay is acceptable. The journalist (probably) did not know if there is an official name in Spanish as well if he’s not familiar with what the name Rays refers to then he can’t assume it refers to the fish. How does he know it may refer to a ray of light? Instead of making an incorrect translation, he left the original English name of the team which is considered correct in translation rather than translate it incorrectly.

    Cosa aparte Wilson Ramos es un buen receptor no creo que Los Rays de Tampa Bay sea un buen equipo para él.




    -MP.
    What I always got a kick out of was the Miami Herald and their policies as far as translating. Hurricane Andrew became hurican Andres,bt when one came along with a Spanish name they didn't translate it. into English for those who didn't do Spanish.
    Der Fish

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derfish View Post
    What I always got a kick out of was the Miami Herald and their policies as far as translating. Hurricane Andrew became hurican Andres,bt when one came along with a Spanish name they didn't translate it. into English for those who didn't do Spanish.
    Der Fish
    Ah! Proper names...

    In Spanish we have el Papa Francisco, but in English he's Pope Francis.
    Christopher Columbus is Cristoforo Colombo in his native land, but Cristóbal Colón in the Spanish-speaking world.
    And my cousin goes by Manuel de Jesús, but I refer to him as Manny-Jesus.

  8. #27
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    And I would love to have some formal translation training, especially in legal documents.




    I think there are some books that would help you.

    Official documents tend to be written in a special sort of incomprehensible drivel.

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  10. #28
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    "4) If you live in the DR how would you compare the grammar of Dominicans vs. the grammar of speakers from other countries?"
    Originally from New York, I have had the opportunity to meet and get to know people from many Spanish speaking countries. Now, before I get attacked with my next statement, keep in mind that many people across the US and the globe believe my "horrible" NY accent and NY use of words destroys the ENGLISH language. Could be, but such is life. As far as Spanish goes, from my experiences, and mine only in dealing with people, and listening to others critique the language, Dominican Spanish is by far the worst on the planet. People I knew/know back in NY, regardless of economic status, took/take pride in speaking Spanish. As it was not just a language to speak, but to be spoken properly with care. This was in regards to people from Puerto Rico, Cuba, Colombia, Venezuela....and quite literally the list can go on and on. It is only with my interactions with Dominicans that I don't witness a "care" for the Spanish language. Here in DR, I notice the only people that tend to approach the language with the patience and attention it deserves are doctors....sometimes. Not even lawyers. It is for this, that many members of Latin American countries look down upon Dominicans. Yes, for the simple reason of how a person speaks. Again, these are not my words, nor my feelings, but the words/feelings of Spanish speakers from other countries who I have known. Yes, there can be tons of reasons: Poverty, lack of education, etc, etc, etc. Me? I'm just a sanpedrogringo.
    Now as far as I'm concerned, I have utilized every resource known to man to learn Spanish. Too long a list to post here. I arrived knowing four words: Hello, Goodbye, Please, and Thank you. Four words which I believe can get you off to a good start in any country....for the most part. 10 years later, I can hold a conversation with most people, but I still get strange looks from people time to time, and hear the words "he's speaking Spanish from Spain not Dominican Spanish". When I do interject Dominican words and phrases I have picked up here to my friends abroad, they ask me where I "picked up that God awful Spanish." Go figure.

  11. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucifer View Post
    Thanks. That's good to know.

    And I would love to have some formal translation training, especially in legal documents. Most programs here in Texas colleges concentrate on literary works. Lately, I've been reading translation material and instructions from Spain.

    Formal translation studies focus on the theory of translation and grammar complexities. The samples used are a variety but as you said most are literary excerpts. Legal translation is definitely complex and my advice is to practice. You can pursue a translation degree (or specialization in translation) but then after it’s all about practice. As well, it’s recommended that you pick one area of translation to focus on for example, accounting terms, finance, business, medical, legal etc. It’s hard to master translation in all fields.

    -MP.
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  12. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derfish View Post
    What I always got a kick out of was the Miami Herald and their policies as far as translating. Hurricane Andrew became hurican Andres,bt when one came along with a Spanish name they didn't translate it. into English for those who didn't do Spanish.
    Der Fish
    I see what you mean and I am not sure why they do that. I have not paid that much attention to it. I think I have always heard Huracán Andrés or Huracán Charlie but not Hurricane Andrés.

    -MP.
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