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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterInBrat View Post
    They poured the second story roof yesterday on the build. No dirt in the mix this time, but I never saw any rebar delivered in the last week or so either and I'm pretty sure I would have noticed... Mi esposa's says it's for Haitian apts.

    There were some good videos put out after the quake on how simple design rules can prevent collapse.

    I remember some teen up in Sosua had her legs crushed last year when a concrete ledge she was on collapsed. **
    you mean Sharina..........and her friend who sadly died in the accident. * * *https://www.facebook.com/sharina.donations/?fref=ts
    Last edited by davetuna; 10-04-2016 at 06:42 PM. Reason: added more info.

  2. #32
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    They're putting in curb gutters down the road. Very nice work. Two guys form an eight foot section with two plywood templates using a 2x4 as a screed. When it's set but not dry, they finish it by dusting dry mortar mix on it then sponging it smooth. With any luck they'll get to our casita and get rid of the mosquito breeding pools. It was one of the main reasons we got an apt with real windows. Mi esposa says they usually only improve roads near election time.

    They did another street about six months ago and ran out of mortar mix. About ten feet of sidewalk failed from water getting under it less than a month after they finished.


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  4. #33
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    Interesting device for laying brick. I wonder if it could be made to work with concrete block here. Still doesn't solve some issues but better than having more than an inch of mortar between runs:


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  6. #34
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    Excellent tool, as an apprentice mason many, many years ago I would have loved to have this tool.

  7. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by windeguy View Post
    I have never seen the "dirt" component when mixing concrete here. That is a good one. It is bad enough when salty sand is used in the mix.
    I pass a building site twice each weekday. They use incredibly dirty sand. The pile has become the toilet spot of choice for the packs of wild dogs which roam the Malecon. This does not faze the builders. Perhaps the dog**** assists the plasticity?

  8. #36
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    Interestingly simple tool. Gotta love the consistency, colour and texture of that concrete too. 

  9. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cdn_Gringo View Post
    Interestingly simple tool. Gotta love the consistency, colour and texture of that concrete too. 
    A house was built two lots down from us. I had a chance to visit the site often.

    The maestro used two types of concrete methods. One was the usual guys mixing on the ground or in a mixer, using local sand and gravel. The sand was grainy and reddish, and the gravel was inconsistent, more like crushed rock without any consistent size. He also brought in cement trucks from Santiago, ConcreDom I recall.

    I got to play with residue from both. The locally mixed concrete easily flaked and was not difficult to break. The commercial concrete was like a rock.

    I don't know the quality of the bags of concrete and the specifics of the mixing rations, but the commercial concrete was a vastly superior product.

    Both were used for general applications, but the commercial concrete was primarily used for the drive and patio/pool areas.

    The mortar was made on the ground and I thought it to be too grainy to be used as mortar. On houses I've built the mortar used was almost a plastic consistency.

    I'm no concrete guru, but I think the cost of using commercially prepared concrete is offset by superior quality.

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  11. #38
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    we used cement truck for roofing over our parking. it was more expensive but i think it was worth it. it took less time and the quality of entire batch is more consistent. next year we plan a pool and will use trucks again. we prefer to pay more money for initial construction than be permanently stuck with repair costs. those things are supposed to last you a lifetime.

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  13. #39
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    If they could figure out how to make one for Cinderblocks I would be all in on this one.

  14. #40
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    It wouldn't be too hard to make one up out of 3/4" plywood. I think you'd have to do one side at a time to avoid bumping into rebar and then a second device to butter the ends of the blocks. The thing is, the crews here will space the blocks up to two inches apart if it saves hacking at blocks.

    The homes used to have unfinished blocks. Now with the skim coats, they can hide all kinds of bad work. And the old work was pretty bad!

    I was watching one crew and they were rinsing the mortar bags out every couple batches and putting them in a stack. My bet is this to prove to the maistro that they weren't selling any bags on the side.

    What is the normal spec for mortar between runs?

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