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  1. #51
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    I am trying to send a letter , how would you say "if there's anything you need, call me at (number)" to a dominican?

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheila26 View Post
    I am trying to send a letter , how would you say "if there's anything you need, call me at (number)" to a dominican?
    si hay algo que necesites, llámame al
    North Coast Moderator
    DR1.com

    Santiago

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  4. #53
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    Caco con caco

    (Head to head)

  5. #54
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    Thank you soo much!!

  6. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljmesg View Post
    Caco con caco

    (Head to head)
    Now I have heard Haitians refer to the head as coco meaning coconut, and casco means helmet(protecting the head,) but caco?

  7. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derfish View Post
    Now I have heard Haitians refer to the head as coco meaning coconut, and casco means helmet(protecting the head,) but caco?
    You caco duro! It’s casco malhablao. Captaste?

  8. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derfish View Post
    Now I have heard Haitians refer to the head as coco meaning coconut, and casco means helmet(protecting the head,) but caco?
    Due to the nature of my work here, I spend a lot of time in both the campo and some barrios of Santiago. The folks is generally encounter have a hate/hate relationship with the letter 's'. It is meticulously extricated from their speech, which sometimes makes it hard for me to figure out exactly what was just said to me....

    Sent from my SM-G610M using Tapatalk

  9. #58
    Moderator Spanish Forum 📚
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derfish View Post
    Now I have heard Haitians refer to the head as coco meaning coconut, and casco means helmet(protecting the head,) but caco?

    What was the context in which caco was used because it is a word?





    -MP.
    Moderator Spanish Forum
    Leer es crecer
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  10. #59
    Moderator Spanish Forum 📚
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kip View Post
    Due to the nature of my work here, I spend a lot of time in both the campo and some barrios of Santiago. The folks is generally encounter have a hate/hate relationship with the letter 's'. It is meticulously extricated from their speech, which sometimes makes it hard for me to figure out exactly what was just said to me....

    Sent from my SM-G610M using Tapatalk

    It is a one of the rasgos features of Caribbean Spanish. Dropping the s at the end of a word and when it is in between a vowel and a consonant. Cuban speech really exemplifies a lot of elimination of the s when it is between a vowel and a consonant.




    -MP.
    Moderator Spanish Forum
    Leer es crecer
    DR1.com

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