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  1. #31
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    Default Suena terrible en inglés...

    En mi opinión es un pésimo inglés.


    You posted this video already in a thread you started last year and I gave my opinion there and it's the same. I don't think this person sounds Caribbean in English at all. The little English that he can speak sounds very Americanized and socio ethnic.

    This was my post about that video:

    http://dr1.com/forums/showthread.php...=1#post1613786



    BTW- Let's keep this thread about Dominican Spanish and Caribbean Spanish since the topics are intertwined. If you want to discuss Caribbean English spoken by Dominicans please post in the thread you already started.




    -MP.
    Last edited by Marianopolita; 05-31-2017 at 09:37 PM.

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  2. #32
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    Default la capital vs. Santiago

    Here is a video that presents some in country rivalry. Who speaks better? - la gente de la capital o la gente de Santiago. One guy said los santiagueros hablan mejor porque hablamos con la /i /. That gave me a good laugh because el cibaeño is considered a true dialect in Spanish one of the few and it's quite the opposite. Hablar con la /i / is not the standard in Spanish. That's like saying hablar con la /zh/ like in Uruguay and Argentina is the standard.

    So who speaks better in the DR? Los de la capital, del Cibao, del sur what do you think?





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  3. #33
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    Default

    There was a time when Dominicans in Puerto Rico were claiming to be from la capitai or capitar

  4. #34
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    Default

    Generally Dominicans speak quite fast. They use a lot of slang words and also many times use words of English descent, for example chequear.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    I would like to add and it is quite an interesting aspect of Spanish (and not only part of Dominican speech) is diminutives and the usage. Observe the usage of diminutives in the Spanish-speaking world and you should stop and think- how fascinating!. Very unlike English, the usage and understanding the usage is special in Spanish.

    Some diminutives are more common than others. As well, the usage is (very) regional. Using common ones as an example – ito/ -ita you will hear in the Spanish-speaking world as well -ico/- ica. Then common in Spain -illo/- illa which is not common in Latin America at all. Costa Ricans get their nickname los Ticos because of their frequent usage of the diminutive -ico/ ica.

    As the articles state the meaning of -ito/-ita in the DR is usually to denote smallness or cariño but it does not always as we evidence in daily speech. Diminutives are common in Dominican speech but I will even extend it and say in Latin America in general to the point where they are even added to adverbs like ahorita (not in Spain) with various meanings depending on the context and country.



    Here are interesting articles from a Dominican newspaper that discuss the usage of diminutives in Dominican popular speech:

    http://eldia.com.do/los-diminutivos-...-dominicano-i/

    http://eldia.com.do/los-diminutivos-...dominicano-ii/

    http://eldia.com.do/los-diminutivos-...inicano-y-iii/


    -MP.


    I stumbled across an article last night in el Nuevo Herald about the usage of diminutives in Cuban speech which I found quite interesting and accurate. If you are familiar with Cuban speech patterns you already know the usage of diminutives is frequent but what is also interesting is to compare it to Spanish spoken in other Caribbean countries for example, the Dominican Republic which is not too far away and shares a similar linguistic history. One fundamental note in Cuban speech is the common diminutive is -ico or -ica as opposed to -ito or -ita.


    What is interesting is the many nuances the usage of diminutives has in Spanish. Understanding the spoken language is key and cannot always be defined in a textbook.


    https://www.elnuevoherald.com/opinio...180098836.html


    -MP.

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  6. #36
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    Default

    Here is one more article (in Spanish) that gives a broader perspective and gives perspective about the usage of diminutives in Latin America in general. It takes into account some of the common ones, the meaning and/ or nuances in different Latin American countries.


    FundeuBBVA is associated with the RAE. It is a great language resource and they have a section in Diario Libre that caters to diverse questions about language.


    https://www.fundeu.es/noticia/diminu...tos-pero-5976/


    -MP.
    Last edited by Marianopolita; 09-09-2018 at 06:34 PM.

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  8. #37
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    a short article from DL explaining few dominican expressions:
    https://www.diariolibre.com/estilos/...nos-BH12153354
    i was only familiar with "chivo sin ley", did not know the others.

  9. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by dv8 View Post
    a short article from DL explaining few dominican expressions:
    https://www.diariolibre.com/estilos/...nos-BH12153354
    i was only familiar with "chivo sin ley", did not know the others.
    Same, never heard of any other than " chivo sin ley ".

    My new personnal favourites this year are :

    " a ti te gusta lo mango bajito ", same as english, about liking low hanging fruit.
    Example : we are looking to challenge people at dominoes, and i spy a particular table with a drunk and his drunk frente, and say " them ". Then my BIL will say to me above expression.
    And
    " eso se llama come y cálla ", literally, " it is called eat-and-shut-up "
    Example : me : what is this batida you made us ?
    Wife : eso se llama come y cálla

  10. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by dv8 View Post
    a short article from DL explaining few dominican expressions:
    https://www.diariolibre.com/estilos/...nos-BH12153354
    i was only familiar with "chivo sin ley", did not know the others.
    Tragarse un cable is the more common use. Same with coger la cuerda.

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