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  1. #1
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    Default Curious to know....

    Driving in any form in this country is not for the faint of heart, most specifically for gringos, I understand this.  With the huge amount of accidents and deaths, how are these worked out among Dominicans?  If there is an accident and a jeepeta hits a moto and there is a serious injury or death, what happens?  With the amount of accidents and deaths, do they do any jail time?  

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by countryroads24 View Post
    Driving in any form in this country is not for the faint of heart, most specifically for gringos, I understand this.  With the huge amount of accidents and deaths, how are these worked out among Dominicans?  If there is an accident and a jeepeta hits a moto and there is a serious injury or death, what happens?  With the amount of accidents and deaths, do they do any jail time?  
    First of all if you have lived in a major city or suburban area in North America than driving in the DR is not a big adjustment. The difference in the DR is that many times people do not follow the traffic rules or patterns. There is very little courtesy shown to other drivers and none to pedestrians. For the most part Dominicans were not taught to be good drivers and most are not. They use the brake to control their speed, when it should be the gas peddel. Speed limits? Right of ways? Que Esta? If you drive in the DR you need to drive defensively and have eyes in the back of your head. Gringos are not use to dealing with so many small motor bikes and scooters. This is the biggest adjustment. They are sometimes hard to see and they think you always see them. Having said alll that if you are unfortunate to be involved in an accident in the DR pray to god that it was not your fault or that you have witnesses as to what went down. Many times it's a he said, she said proposition. If there is injury involved, regardless of who's fault it was, you will have to go to the police station. From there most anything can happen. Make sure you have the phone number of a good lawyer in your pocket along with your cell phone. You may have to fork over some pesos to set the whole thing right. The other thing you are up against in the DR is that if you have an accident involving damage to your or their vehicle they might not have insurance or enough coverage to make it right. I drove all over the country from little towns to SD and fortunately never had a problem. When driving in the DR it sometimes seems that you are in a real time video game and you need to get from point A to B without a problem. Like I said, you literally need eyes in the back of your head and very good periferal vision. If you are one of these people that have tunnel vision and are so worried about driving you will not have a good experience. Don't even get me started on driving at night. That is a whole nother ballgame. If driving in the DR exceeds your comfort level than don't do it. Hire a car and driver, a moto or take public transportation. You will be happy that you did.

  3. #3
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    you need to use all your peripheral senses.... ALL

    Yes, there is a known number for the value of a life.... It has been posted here before.
    The number to be paid if someone is killed by a car .

    I don't know that number and hope I never do

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  5. #4
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    I am asking about Dominican vs Dominican?  What happens....always a settlement?  There are so many accidents...or jail time??

  6. #5
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    How is it NOT a big adjustment after your description of driving in the DR?   

     
    Quote Originally Posted by LTSteve View Post
    First of all if you have lived in a major city or suburban area in North America than driving in the DR is not a big adjustment. The difference in the DR is that many times people do not follow the traffic rules or patterns. There is very little courtesy shown to other drivers and none to pedestrians. For the most part Dominicans were not taught to be good drivers and most are not. They use the brake to control their speed, when it should be the gas peddel. Speed limits? Right of ways? Que Esta? If you drive in the DR you need to drive defensively and have eyes in the back of your head. Gringos are not use to dealing with so many small motor bikes and scooters. This is the biggest adjustment. They are sometimes hard to see and they think you always see them. Having said alll that if you are unfortunate to be involved in an accident in the DR pray to god that it was not your fault or that you have witnesses as to what went down. Many times it's a he said, she said proposition. If there is injury involved, regardless of who's fault it was, you will have to go to the police station. From there most anything can happen. Make sure you have the phone number of a good lawyer in your pocket along with your cell phone. You may have to fork over some pesos to set the whole thing right. The other thing you are up against in the DR is that if you have an accident involving damage to your or their vehicle they might not have insurance or enough coverage to make it right. I drove all over the country from little towns to SD and fortunately never had a problem. When driving in the DR it sometimes seems that you are in a real time video game and you need to get from point A to B without a problem. Like I said, you literally need eyes in the back of your head and very good periferal vision. If you are one of these people that have tunnel vision and are so worried about driving you will not have a good experience. Don't even get me started on driving at night. That is a whole nother ballgame. If driving in the DR exceeds your comfort level than don't do it. Hire a car and driver, a moto or take public transportation. You will be happy that you did.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by countryroads24 View Post
    I am asking about Dominican vs Dominican?  What happens....always a settlement?  There are so many accidents...or jail time??
    depends. i spoke to a lawyer about this last year and he said standard compensation is 2 million pesos for death and 1 million pesos for injury. but this is, of course, for people who have money. other people pay what they can afford. between the poor nothing much happens. one cannot squeeze water out of a stone.
    and no jail, really. occasionally one sees news that a driver who caused an accident was arrested but i don't see news about sentences. and a few months back a guy who caused a massive accident in samana and arrested was caught after making a u-turn on avenida churchill in SD just few weeks later, he was simply let go.

  8. #7
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    Been in Puerto Plata 12 times, i am a very good defensive driver, but no way i would rent a car and drive there. I think i would feel like a target $$$$$

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  10. #8
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    I was in a truck headed into Puerto plata with my friend ant two other people when a moto ran head on into us, the girl on the back got thrown off the bike and only had scratches but the guy died shortly after. even though she admitted he was drunk and it was his fault it still cost my friend about $ 5,000 US all total.

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  12. #9
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    I have been driving my own vehicle in the DR since 2007 and have driven to almost every area of the country. I live in Santo Domingo and can attest to everything said by LTSteve above. The only thing he failed to mention is the necessity of using your horn most all the time. If you don't you increase your chances of someone pulling over onto you as you overtake them. He also didn't mention the fact that many cars and motos do not have functioning taillights, stoplights and headlights making them virtually invisible at night. In addition, the ones that do have functioning headlights keep them on highbeams to effectively blind you when coming at you. In spite of all the things mentioned, I love driving in the DR as I never have to worry about getting tickets as I do in the States, just carry a few pesos and you can get out of anything.

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  14. #10
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    Adding to CEO's comments

    They never or rarely indicate for turning...horn by you
    They often drive against the traffic....wrong side of road.
    They pass without giving notice.....always a horn when passing.

    It's a long list, those are the highlights 

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