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  1. #1
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    Default Tech Guru Advice Needed

    Where are the Brainiacs??

    Does this sound like a good deal for here?
    Given the recent concrete wall discussion?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/26/t...=business&_r=0

    Might be able to share with neighbors using this .....
    for the penny pinchers like me !!!

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by william webster View Post
    Where are the Brainiacs??

    Does this sound like a good deal for here?
    Given the recent concrete wall discussion?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/26/t...=business&_r=0

    Might be able to share with neighbors using this .....
    for the penny pinchers like me !!!
    Sharing wi-fi sounds ok but I would be a little worried about the security end of it. I would think that being on the same network would make it easier for someone to hack your data.

  4. #3
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    Password protected might help LT....

    The real question is getting better service in your own house...

  5. #4
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    A mesh network sounds great but I do not think it's quite ready for prime time just yet in the Dominican Republic. I'm hoping when the time comes to replace my current router I'll be able to make the jump.

    As I have mentioned in another thread, data equipment can be adversely affected by electricity supply issues. No power, obviously no internet. I live in a perpetual under voltage world. My sensitive electronics are all run via a banks UPS(s) and these things kick in all the time to boost the voltage being supplied. If I turn on the microwave the UPS kicks in. If I turn on the microwave the toaster, the toast isn't brown and the food isn't hot-the whole time the UPS is boosting the power being supplied to my two desks full of networked equipment.

    Over voltage conditions can be worse, but this is not something I have seen but a couple of times, usually after a blackout, there can be a surge of voltage as utility power is being restored. Those on a decent inverter, probably won't see this as the inverter should buffer the transient spike. The DR does not appear to be able to produce a sustained over voltage situation without help from Mother Nature.

    Inverters that do not use produce sinusoidal backup power, are just plain bad for sensitive electronics (and anything with a motor) and can affect everything from quality of operation to the longevity of the device. Those on dedicated high end solar power systems may not have any of these power issues. If however, you are connected to the grid here, you certainly will. I need to install a whole home voltage regulator and transfer switch. I probably won't live in my current rental location long enough to justify that expense.

    The average person who doesn't have a display showing input voltage or the stability/quality of the power being delivered will go about their day completely oblivious. I have seen voltages as low as 60V for periods of up to two hours. Nothing works well or at all under this condition.

    Generally, I like the mesh network concept. I don't like Google. They are 95% evil and self-serving. I do not trust that company to provide network infrastructure without beaming home all sorts of info on every user that connects to the network. Amazon needs to know what I have purchased so they can send it to me, Google does not nor does Google need to know what TV shows I download. I don't have a gmail account (or an account with any other free email provider) because I don't want my emails to be stored and regularly scanned for tidbits of marketing info.

    Ideally, I am waiting for the time when I can put a mesh satellite in every room of my house, two outside all for about $400. Price wise we are not there yet and I think some more time may bring about more innovation and more consumer choice. Just like router based wifi, mesh signals still need to pass through walls. Lumber and drywall is easier to penetrate than concrete. One will need to compensate for this by using more than the manufacturer recommended best case scenario of just two or three satellites in a concrete house.

    The best networking solution remains cables running to each room but reasonably one can only do this during construction. The current solution, of router and repeaters leaves much to be desired. Mesh could very well be the answer, it just needs to be more affordable so people can do the job right the first time so that they can truly have seamless internet in every room. If you have to compromise on the number of satellites initially, why start down that path at all?

    Also, the warranties for this new equipment is voided by installing it in this country or pretty much anywhere outside of the geography mentioned in the the documentation.

    I remain hopeful, that some more time will deliver to us a better solution than currently exists. While mesh may indeed be a better solution, its adoption at least for me, is constrained by the need to achieve optimum results at a price I can justify using equipment that won't become obsolete quickly in an emergent consumer marketplace.

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  7. #5
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    Just the Brainiac I was waiting for.....

    Gracias Professor 

  8. #6
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    I should also mention, mesh works best with a high speed internet connection. The inherent hop latency is offset by faster data download speeds to the base station. Those who current subscribe to internet plans of less than say 15-20 mbits/s may actually see a reduction in overall network response time compared to current router performance, especially if relying on a wifi signal for device connection. Plugging a device into the satellite with an ethernet cable should overcome this for lower speed internet plans but having to plug in kind of defeats the point of adopting mesh networking.

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  10. #7
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    Or get a router that supports multiple SSIDs if you look into sharing. For ex. something like a Cisco RV120W or similar.

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