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  1. #1
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    Default Intrant will use breathalyzers to reduce DUI incidences

    While reading the DR1 News & Updates of Wednesday, 6 December 2017, I came across a very interesting news item, which surprisingly enough is not currently being discussed within these forums. In deference to Dolores, and the editing team of DR1 News I am copying and pasting the news item here for conversation. Responses may prove to be interesting, as indirect references to the subject matter are frequently made.

    "As of the first quarter of 2018, the National Land Transit and Transport Institute (Intrant) agents will be conducting sobriety tests for drivers. Breathalyzers will be used to curb driving under the influence and reckless driving in the Dominican Republic. Those testing positive will be fined five to 10 minimum public sector wages. De los Santos said a normal fine could be for more than RD$25,000. The charge will be made by the Attorney General Office.
    Claudia Franchesca de los Santos said that a pilot program would begin using breathalyzers donated by the International Alliance for Responsible Consumption (IARD). Metropolitan Transport Authority (AMET) and Transit and Land Transport Agency (Digesett), Police, Armed Forces, and the Police Commission of the Ministry of Public Works agents are being trained to correctly use the safe driving tools and deal with those testing as driving under the influence.
    In the Dominican Republic you can buy alcoholic beverages at fueling stations, and driving under the influence is widespread.
    During a past presidency of Leonel Fernandez in 2007, then Minister of Interior and Police Franklin Almeyda had announced the decision to purchase 1,200 breathalyzers at a cost to taxpayers of US$108,534.24. The effect of the Breathalyzer CDP 6000 that was chosen by the procurement commission or their use or non use was not covered in the media. Indeed, there are no follow-up stories online to the announcement of the purchase."
    https://www.diariolibre.com/noticias...-mil-ND8713917
    https://www.listindiario.com/la-repu...-a-conductores

  2. #2
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    Will we finally begin to see proper enforcement, and consequences for irresponsible behavior? Can lives be saved?

  3. #3
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    Claudia Franchesca de los Santos said that a pilot program would begin using breathalyzers donated by the International Alliance for Responsible Consumption (IARD).
    During a past presidency of Leonel Fernandez in 2007, then Minister of Interior and Police Franklin Almeyda had announced the decision to purchase 1,200 breathalyzers at a cost to taxpayers of US$108,534.24.
    Why would they be using breathalysers donated by the International Alliance for Responsible Consumption (IARD)?

    What happened to the 1,200 breathalysers at a cost to taxpayers of US$108,534.24?

    ✨🤶✨ Season's Greetings ✨🎅✨

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  5. #4
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    About 7 years ago as I was about to cross the Hermanos Patiño bridge in Santiago I was stopped and given a breathalyzer test..... I only had one drink much earlier in the day and passed with no problem....I was happy they knew which orifice to use....

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  7. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by SantiagoDR View Post
    Why would they be using breathalysers donated by the International Alliance for Responsible Consumption (IARD)?

    What happened to the 1,200 breathalysers at a cost to taxpayers of US$108,534.24?
    Good question. As SantiagoDR pointed out, this has been "tried" before and nothing happened except for the breathalyzers disappearing and someone making money (and one person, Juan Bosch being stopped once ). Unlikely it will "work" this time regardless of the origin of the units.

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  9. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by SantiagoDR View Post
    Why would they be using breathalysers donated by the International Alliance for Responsible Consumption (IARD)?

    What happened to the 1,200 breathalysers at a cost to taxpayers of US$108,534.24?
    ......what happened?........I think a very nice new jeepeta,,,,,for someone.......

  10. #7
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    PN at roadside checkpoint: "Yes sir - Congratulations you passed the breathalyzer, you are free to go on your scooter tonight with no working lights, no brakes, worn out tires, no registration papers, your 3 passengers, no helmets and that propane bottle balanced on the foot-board along with your open bottle of Presidente in your left hand.
    Have a safe evening, ....... oh and say hi to your madre."

  11. #8
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    On a good day the police only work till around 4:30 in the Bavaro area. You still see them driving around all evening and night but they are just collecting propinas and hassling the working girls.
    A breathilizer in the DR is just another way these clowns are going to bribe you with.

  12. #9
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    PN cannot stop you for traffic enforcement, only AMET/INTRANT can. Get that part.

    For PN to stop you, there would need to be also at least one AMET/INTRANT present at the checkpoint.

    Same as they cannot just go through your car if there is no fiscal present. Same as a J2/G2 checkpoint cannot legally do nothing if your marbete/revista/whatever is missing... they can hassle you though, and if you do not know better, you get hassled.

    Know which LE is allowed to do what, and know Spanish and have at least some basic connections in the country, and you will be fine and not get hassled for everything by everybody.

    Only mixed checkpoints can check for various things, but it must be the appropriate branch of LE officer doing the checking. E.g. PN cannot detain you for being illegal for not having valid cedula/residency/passport on you, only DGM officer in a mixed checkpoint could. PN officer cannot even ask you for validity of your stay in DR, that question must be posed by DGM officer. Same as PN cannot hassle you for not having Marbete (but they can ask you for car registration to check if the car is not stolen... but they cannot ask you for your driver's license for example (well they can but they cannot detain you for not having one, only a present AMET could do that). That's the reason of why sometimes mixed checkpoints are done. A single agency checkpoint, they can only do what their LE branch is allowed to do.
    Last edited by rubio_higuey; 12-09-2017 at 11:33 AM.

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  14. #10
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    PN is only allowed to stop you for propinas.

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