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Thread: Top 5 most dangerous neighborhoods in Santo Domingo

  1. #41
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    Let’s try to keep this about Santo Domingo please




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  2. #42
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    TP,

    All people have the potential to be "bad". Humanity is basically a violent collection of animals that often harms other creatures for some perceive personal/collective gain. Those people who live in poverty and are surrounded by those who have more or the means to achieve an easier existence, can't help but contemplate how they too can quickly and easily achieve the same from time to time.

    Not everyone resorts to their primal instincts in a society but everyone possesses the predilection to do so. Friend, stranger, neighbor or transient you can never know what truly dwells in the minds of others. For 24/hr a day evidence of just how stupid, self absorbed and callous "trusted" human beings can be, tune into the Discovery ID channel or the Oxygen network on TV.

    In this regard, Dominicans are no different than anyone else. Poverty can certainly shape one's outlook, but in the end there is always that choice by the individual in the time preceding an antisocial act. Speaking Spanish, being pleasant to your neighbors, being a part of your community is laudable but in and of itself, not a guarantee of safety from someone who sees you and your stuff as a means to an end.

    Living in a gated community is nothing more than an attempt to limit access to temptation and to limit the likelihood of potential problems to a smaller subset of the population that has unfettered access to the gate. No guarantees, but enough of a perceived advantage to be appealing to those who are able to make use of the concept. I have lots of Dominican neighbors in my gated community, one family with the last name Guzman. So Dominicans too are opting for this type of living arrangement.

    In some areas of this country, as the title of this thread suggests, there is a clear advantage in not having to deal with socioeconomic inequality.

    Nothing wrong with choosing to live outside a gate. Lots of quality Dominican and foreign neighbors alike to be found here. Even within the poorest of neighborhoods. Most affluent people though would not choose to live in such a place given a choice just as many who already live in such a place would jump at the opportunity to be able to live somewhere more appealing.

    You cannot use the concept of a barrio and those who live there out of necessity as a gauge of their personality but you do have to accept that in such a place, you are more likely to encounter "ne're do wells" actively seeking an opportunity to take advantage.

    Due to circumstances beyond my control and specifically due to one of the primary pitfalls of being a renter, I will be relocating shortly. I have been in the DR long enough to now have a decent understanding of the realities in my town and of the history of the neighborhood I will be moving to. Both my wife and I have made the deliberate choice to forgo the big gate this time around, to give it a go a bit closer to the "real DR". We are not naive however, and there will be fences, dogs and very clear indications that this property should be far down the target list of anyone looking for an easy opportunity.

    We have choices and opted this time around for a change. If it works out, great if not, hopefully we'll still be around to make a different choice. All things considered, I'm not moving to a proper barrio, just a Dominican neighborhood like so many other foreigners have chosen to do. The personal risk of this action is greater than what we currently face, but not significantly so, I believe. I am under no illusions though that I am voluntarily removing at least two rings of security that are available where we are now and accepting to rely more heavily on the other security measure I employ to compensate for the increased level of exposure to some risk.

    The takeaway from all this is supposed to be that everyone is a potential risk and one should not assume that close friends, lovers and cordial neighbors are or always will be deserving of the your casual disregard of the human condition. There are just too many everyday examples of these behaviors to be ignored both inside and outside "the gate", in this country or in any other country. Proper barrios may have more frequent examples than other areas and that's why we are talking in this thread about the perception of the 5 worst. Some of which, may move off of the top 5 list from time to time as areas take their place. It should come as no surprise that "the worst" are usually in the places with the largest concentration of people, ie the larger cities.
    Last edited by Cdn_Gringo; 03-18-2019 at 11:33 AM.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fernandez View Post
    Sadly, its not about poverty. Poverty does not define one- it impacts life, and the conditions of poverty are dealt with in so many different ways. What is lost in the discussion is the social decay that can infect poverty- but it can infect those of wealth as well. The goodness in people exists in each socio economic strata- as does the the influence of evil and corruption.
    Very true.

    "Poverty" and "social decay" are not necessarily connected.
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  5. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobraboy View Post
    Very true.

    "Poverty" and "social decay" are not necessarily connected.
    Agree.

    The mix of them when concocted produces very bad people.

  6. #45
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    If you think that the Dominicans who pay their nanny $250 US a month to raise their kids and drive a nice jeepita are fine upstanding citizens, you’ve a loooong way to go. If you don’t, then great. I am speaking from experience, having worked in SD. The rich Piantini/Naco/Bella Vista crowds are just as capable of shady operations as anyone. They just have the money to get away with it when they get caught.

    And when I volunteered in Villa Agrícolas (#5 on the list), nobody bothered me.
    If it came down to who I’d want in my corner if I really needed it? Pfft. Does money buy integrity? Nope. And I saw more decency en las calles than I ever saw saw in Blue Mall.
    I’m not saying there aren’t sleezebags in the barrios, but I am saying they exist amongst the priveleged as well. In SD, DR, and worldwide.

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