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Thread: Residency renewal

  1. #231
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    Quote Originally Posted by TropicalPaul View Post
    I know a lot of people on here love Guzman Ariza, but they are very expensive. I have the Rentista visa which is the same type of category as Pensionista and it is very very easy to renew. Save your money next time.
    Guzman Ariza is not very expensive. Cravath--a white shoe firm in the U.S.--is very expensive. Yes, the firm charges more than the average--it admits this--but you are getting first-tier legal representation with legal professionals fluent in multiple languages including yours. As I stated before, you are not hiring a law firm for the general, ordinary exercises. You are hiring the firm to assist you when the "inconveniences" and things out of the ordinary occur. I had an "inconvenience" once, and Guzman Ariza handled the matter like a U.S., white shoe law firm and DID NOT charge me for this unexpected inconvenience. Most firms would have so charged me for the time if nothing else. Yes, the average person of reasonable intelligence can do a simple immigration matter in the DR. This is not the U.S. However, as so stated, some simply choose to use top-tier and capable counsel.

  2. #232
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    Quote Originally Posted by malko View Post
    Sooooooooo,..........

    My demand to change from temporal to permanente was denied on the website. No explination.
    I had uploaded everything, and had 2 messages ( one for a picture that was left profil and not right profil, and then the certificado de no antecedentes penales was not clear enough ). Uploaded the extra stuff. And denied.
    In santiago, they had no idea why, though they said maybe I needed 6 years of temporal..........

    Anyway, I just uploaded the exact same documents, but in the residency temporal renewal. And accepted in 2 days. But it was Xmas/NewYear time, so i just left it ( i am still in the time limit )
    So I printed the DGM paper out and noticed another print-out. A bill for 5k pesos.

    So off I went with the 2 print-outs, my original documents and my 3 copies of each document, to DGM SD.

    What has changed ? Yeah, cos something ALWAYS changes........

    #1. You do not get your carnete the same day, like you did before. Basically you drop off your documents ( and as always they hand you your copies back........ you have to wonder why the website asks for 3 copies of each document ), then you go to a diffrent window and pay your 5k pesos, and they give you a date to come back and pick up your residency.
    I asked at the first window, then at the caja window, and then at a " supervisor" window if it was not possible to get it the same day, as it was before ( the VIP service ).
    Well, no. If you have to travel, they can do it in a week ( for 1k pesos more ), and the kind lady said i could do that ( though i am not going to travel ), which i declined ( the whole point was to save me a trip to noisy, dirty, stuffy, busy SD, so 1 week or 3 weeks......all the same for me ).

    #2. You cant walk in and out of the DGM anymore. You go in through the front door, and out the back door now. They ask you as you leave, if you are finished.

    #3. No more bringing-someone along for the ride. Only the applicante goes in. Not a bad thing. Less people in the waiting hall, much less noise, so much easier to understand them at the windows.

    Went in to DGM at 08.00, out at 08.25.

    And will have to go back at the end of the month to get residency card
    So 3 weeks later, went back to DGM SD to pick up residency card.
    Quite painless.
    In at 0800, get ticket, go to window, hand over payement receipt and the sheet of paper DGM gives you when you deposit documents.
    Around 0830, maybe, get called for picture.
    0900-0930, sign DGM book, and get residency card.

    Drive off to JCE. Lots of people, haitians, waiting...... my heart dropped.
    But, luckily, if its a renewal, you just walk in to office, then over to payement, and then off to picture and datos. Over to waiting room, and pick up cedula. 30 minutes in and out.

    What I learned : I should have depoisited my documents in santiago......,would have saved my a trip to SD.
    I didnt count my years of residency properly, dixt DGM. The website, mi pagina, shows my 1st residency as 2014. I have my doubts, but cant be bothered to rummage through my paperwork. So will try for permanent again next year, lol.

    Total cost : 5k pesos insurance , 5k pesos renewal, 3k pesos cedula....... and say 2k pesos for getting the diffrent docs ( on the high side ).
    So 15k pesos for another year of residency.

  3. #233
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    A word of warning for those going to DGM to renew their Residency: I arrived and entered the crowded main room as usual, then when my name was called and I was given a pass, I went to enter the "inner sanctum" to have my photo taken and be fingerprinted. The security guard stopped me from entering because she spotted my sandal shod feet under my trousers. I must admit, I had forgotten about this stupid rule, but I pointed out numerous ladies who were wearing open shoes, to be told that ladies were allowed open shoes, but men were not. I can't work out the logic of that, but it was confirmed by the several other officials I spoke to.

    I certainly didn't want to lose more time by leaving the building to try to find a shoe shop, so in desperation I tried to speak to another waiting "client" who looked like his feet might be the same size as mine and who looked friendly enough. He passed me onto his friend who spoke English, and this guy laughed and told me that if I went out to the back of the building there was a guy who would rent me a pair of shoes! These guys don't miss a trick to make a few pesos! I found the shoe entrepreneur and he removed his filthy tennis shoes and passed them over to me for 200 pesos, keeping my sandals until I returned, which I did a few minutes later after my visit to the inner sanctum. I then wore my sandals for the rest of my stay there, without further complaint or incident.

    I know they like to make it as difficult as possible to do the right thing and have legal Residency, but this seems like one unnecessary hurdle too many!

  4. Likes cavok, Linda Stapleton liked this post
  5. #234
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    Absolutely perfect.....

    hilarious.....
    like the old --"Saved by the bell"
    but this time "Saved by the Dominican"

  6. Likes drstock liked this post
  7. #235
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    Quote Originally Posted by drstock View Post
    A word of warning for those going to DGM to renew their Residency: I arrived and entered the crowded main room as usual, then when my name was called and I was given a pass, I went to enter the "inner sanctum" to have my photo taken and be fingerprinted. The security guard stopped me from entering because she spotted my sandal shod feet under my trousers. I must admit, I had forgotten about this stupid rule, but I pointed out numerous ladies who were wearing open shoes, to be told that ladies were allowed open shoes, but men were not. I can't work out the logic of that, but it was confirmed by the several other officials I spoke to.

    I certainly didn't want to lose more time by leaving the building to try to find a shoe shop, so in desperation I tried to speak to another waiting "client" who looked like his feet might be the same size as mine and who looked friendly enough. He passed me onto his friend who spoke English, and this guy laughed and told me that if I went out to the back of the building there was a guy who would rent me a pair of shoes! These guys don't miss a trick to make a few pesos! I found the shoe entrepreneur and he removed his filthy tennis shoes and passed them over to me for 200 pesos, keeping my sandals until I returned, which I did a few minutes later after my visit to the inner sanctum. I then wore my sandals for the rest of my stay there, without further complaint or incident.

    I know they like to make it as difficult as possible to do the right thing and have legal Residency, but this seems like one unnecessary hurdle too many!
    Is your physician still treating your Athlete's Foot, or did you use Vicks Vapo Rub?

  8. Likes rhanson1 liked this post
  9. #236
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tashi Siu's Dad View Post
    Is your physician still treating your Athlete's Foot, or did you use Vicks Vapo Rub?
    Amazingly, no sign of infection or disease yet!

  10. #237
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    Quote Originally Posted by drstock View Post
    The security guard stopped me from entering because she spotted my sandal shod feet under my trousers. I must admit, I had forgotten about this stupid rule, but I pointed out numerous ladies who were wearing open shoes, to be told that ladies were allowed open shoes, but men were not. I can't work out the logic of that, but it was confirmed by the several other officials I spoke to.
    Well, it is well established that Latin American countries have a dress code when doing business with the government, and the DR requires shoes. This has been the rule as long as I have been here. You may not like it, but it remains one of the few rules that remain constant. Frankly, I get annoyed every time that Guzman Ariza reminds me.

    Quote Originally Posted by drstock View Post
    [T]here was a guy who would rent me a pair of shoes! These guys don't miss a trick to make a few pesos!
    Give credit where it is due. There is no trick. The guy saw a business opportunity, and seized it. You paid the equivalent of USD $4 to avoid losing your turn and having to leave and purchase a pair of shoes that you knew you needed prior to arriving at DGM. Personally, I would have tipped him an additional 100 pesos. I like entrepreneurs like this.

  11. #238
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    I don't know if this has changed, but years ago when I went to the Palacio de Justicia and the Tribunal de Tierras in Puerto Plata, besides requiring shoes, long pants and a shirt with a collar were required to enter. My friend and I were wearing shorts. Unfortunately, there weren't any Dominicans renting long pants at that time.

  12. #239
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    Still applies.... no shorts etc

  13. #240
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    Quote Originally Posted by cavok View Post
    Guzman is not that expensive. I used them for my initial residency. I paid $1900 which was $400 more than local, small-time local lawyers were charging.

    It's hard to believe that they are now charging $3000 for a renewal when it is so relatively easy to do by yourself and many posters here have done it.
    Do you have the web page link to renew residency online? I called up the office to be told it's all done online now, but I can't seem to find the page to actually renew my residency. Just information confirming that it can be done online.

    Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

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