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Thread: tourist visa extension - from US

  1. #21
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    I know people living here for 25 years and more with no residency. They come and go all the time. Just pay the fee. If you do go for residency go all the way and get citizenship. With residency they can change the rules at will, and have been doing that.

    I have no horse in this race as I have had citizenship here for 14 years.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by SKY View Post
    I know people living here for 25 years and more with no residency. They come and go all the time. Just pay the fee. If you do go for residency go all the way and get citizenship. With residency they can change the rules at will, and have been doing that.

    I have no horse in this race as I have had citizenship here for 14 years.


    thanks SKY, would you happen to know the fines by days overstayed?  roughly speaking...

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by malko View Post
    The answer, i think, would be yes. Like say a few days to the US then back again. And yes it would also reset your "right " to drive on a US DL.

    It could be more tricky if you plan on doing it the Haiti "way". ( as in crossimg the border with haiti and back ).

    please note, this is not legal advise, but just common sense.
    I went to Haiti for a day then returned paid the $10. to get into Haiti and the $10. to return to RD.
    No problems.
    Met with an Immigration Officer in POP and was told to just pay the overstay fee when I leave ; also in the opinion of the Officer I was not illegal. But, beware of scams from Politur, Police, AMET, Army and any other gangster who has an ID badge hanging over their necks.
    Good advice from CDN-Gringo ''Lay low, keep low profile and smile... "
    THis site has been followed by Ministry of Migration ; quite closely from what I understand. So they get the message and mav very soon make it easier (like 10 years in the future).
    Russell

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by chas123 View Post
    thanks SKY, would you happen to know the fines by days overstayed?  roughly speaking...

    Time Cost
    1 day to 3 months RD$2,500.00
    3 to 9 months RD$4,000.00
    9 to 12 months RD$5,000.00
    12 to 18 months RD$6,500.00
    18 to 24 months RD$8,000.00
    24 to 30 months RD$9,500.00
    30 to 36 months RD$11,000.00
    36 to 48 months RD$16,000.00
    48 to 60 months RD$20,000.00
    6 years RD$30,000.00
    7 years RD$40,000.00
    8 years RD$50,000.00
    9 years RD$60,000.00
    10 years RD$70,000.00
    Moderator Visa forums
    www.DR1.com


  6. #25
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    This thread should be merged or closed...

  7. #26
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    TL;DR

    1) The DR does not want nor does it encourage foreigners to come here to live and work.
    2) Residency has been and still is for the most part limited to those who have an ongoing formalized external income source.
    3) You can't become a citizen without first getting residency (have an ongoing income source).

    It seems that one of the most difficult points to get across in these discussions is the practical reality of the immigration system here in the DR.

    As many people do and just as many advocate doing - you can come and stay in this country for a long time without much in the way of consequences. "Forever", the govt here has dinged people who overstay a fee when they leave. This fee is not an endorsement of the practice of overstaying, rather a way to monetize the act of doing so rather than sending you to jail.

    The point that most prefer to gloss over is that after 30 days if you remain in the DR, you do not enjoy the full protection of law. It doesn't matter if these people are called illegal aliens, irregular migrants or shrewd interlopers, the fact is simply that you are not supposed to be in the country.

    Yes, not much has been done about this with respect to white foreign nationals with a means to support themselves. Landlords don't seem to care if you are a resident or not as long as you can pay the monthly rent, they'll take your money. Want to buy a car, sure, someone will sell you one and the Govt seems ok with registering it to you as long as your fork over the money to all involved. Insurance companies, providing liability type insurance such as auto insurance are quite happy to take your money too. Some pay claims and some don't when it comes to illegal aliens. There has been at least one report of a medical insurer providing differing coverage based on residency status.

    The govt, the police, the courts, businesses, lawyers, casual domestic workers all take advantage of the overstayer because they can and because they know that such an individual will not pursue the matter much beyond an initial complaint of unfair treatment. The current system is built on the premise that money is easier to get from those who do not have a solid legal footing in this country and as a result are not inclined to put up much of a protest. No wonder little is done to protect "the individual overstayer" because in the end, it's all about the money and the hammer they hold over the heads of those who willingly put themselves into this predicament.

    Yes you can come and live in the DR pretty much as long as you like. Provided you accept that you have limited recourse should you get into some sort of contractual or financial dispute. You accept that you walk the streets pretty much at the pleasure of the govt, the police and the courts. From time to time you will have to pay to achieve your desired objective, even if that objective is the continued ability to walk the streets.

    It is quite possible that you can go a long time without any direct negative impact predicated by one's decision to overstay. On the other hand, you could (even if unlikely) not have that experience. The longer you stay, the more likely it is that you will get comfortable, accumulate stuff (some of which can be expensive) and grow complacent. Probably not next month, or even this year but sometime, at a time of "their" choosing, someone(s) without legal status in this country will get a rude awakening, probably without much advance notice.

    If you are prepared to live this way, with a degree of uncertainty and assuming an element of risk, that's your choice to make. However, it would be folly to believe that the fees paid upon exit offer any sort legitimacy to the decision to overstay. You pay these fees because if you do not you will not be permitted to catch your flight. The DR holds all the power. Tourists here for less than 30 days, legal residents and naturalized foreigners can't be prevented from coming and going without good reason. You others, accept a degree of uncertainty day to day and hope that the whims of this country do not change in a way that impacts you and your expensive stuff.

    The message that most newcomers seem to embrace is the message they want to hear, put forward by those who are betting on the system not changing. "Come on down, pay the exit fee when you leave and everything will be golden." While sort of the truth, this operational philosophy (even if the "official govt line" as per DGM) is not one with any sort of legitimacy or guarantee. I point you again to this post by DR1's Laywer of record:

    http://dr1.com/forums/showthread.php...=1#post1762215

    For some reason, it seems fashionable for some to view residing in the DR without legitimacy in a different light than they would view those who do so in their home country. After all these years, I have to conclude that implied feasibility of doing so here in the DR overshadows the practical reality in our home countries where it is explicitly stated that you may not overstay your visa and where there is no simple exit fee if you do.

    Just because you CAN do something, doesn't necessarily make it something you SHOULD do. In the end, individuals will make up their own minds and do whatever they feel comfortable doing. I would hope that before coming to live here in the DR (or any other country for that matter) individuals take the time to make sure, that their decisions are not based on only the ability to do something but on the more important realization of just how horribly complicated things could get if the plan does not unfold as expected. Aliens are vulnerable here and no amount of wishful prognostication changes that fact.

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  9. #27
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    DR1's lawyer has confirmed that if you enter on a 30 day tourist card, after 30 days you are no longer legally in the DR. So far, nobody really cares enough to change this situation. So just continue to pay the exit fees. This has been discussed and confirmed a number of times.

  10. #28
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    Friends , Romans, countrymen - lend me your ears....
    Marc Anthony via Wm Shakespeare - and borrowed by Cdn Gringo

    What have you got in that bag there - they ask ??

    Ears.... he replies


    Well said Buster... and concisely by your standards.... hahaha

    But so true... we see and hear what we choose, how we choose
    Fact of life

    The ostrich has a very good idea about how to avoid too much grief.

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  12. #29
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    I cannot understand why so many of us chronic overstayers risk driving here after the Tourist Card expires without a valid license. Simply pay $20 and get an International Driver's Permit. It's valid for a year, and I get one every year when I return to the United States. But it can even be handled by mail if you don't want to go back to the States. It's issued by AAA for U.S. citizens, but I assume it available in other countries as well. The only requirement is that you must have a valid drivers license in the country where you are from. Obviously this won't help you if you get into some kind of other trouble after you have overstayed your 30-day Tourist Card, but at least it eliminates the risk of driving without a valid license. I have reviewed this with two different local lawyers, and both of them confirmed that this International Driver's Permit is valid here in the DR. Am i missing something? https://www.aaa.com/vacation/idpf.html

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  14. #30
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    Great idea though I thought overseas drivers license were good for 90 days?

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