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Thread: Oxfam Sex Scandal in Haiti

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by drstock View Post
    To me this is no news at all. There are prostitutes who make themselves available to foreigners in Haiti? That's hardly news - half the prostitutes in the DR come from Haiti. The girls who do this do so with the full knowledge of boyfriends, husbands and often families. The girls are not exploited, they are delighted to earn the money. There is terrible unemployment in Haiti and this is one way a girl can earn money to feed the inevitable children. And in the articles I have read, nowhere do I see that there is any evidence of underage girls being involved - just the word that it is a possibility. Hardly enough to call anyone guilty.
    I'm not sure that passing money to Haitian prostitutes isn't one of the better ways to get money to the families in the street it seems to me a better option than the money being soaked up by the politicians or buying another Fleet of vehicles for the aid workers

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  3. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by NALs View Post
    Is his name Dagoberto Tejeda? 

    50ish or 60ish (maybe older) with very long hair and a big dark spot on his forehead above one of his eyebrows.
    I suspect she might be referring to Roldan Marmol (who, incidentally, looks like a Spanish Conquistador). In that case I agree with the charge of cultural appropiation, annoying as that SJW fad is.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cobraboy View Post
    Priorities.

    And they were NOT just Africans and cars from Africa.
    Edit to correct.

  5. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Caonabo View Post
    Sooner or later, every NGO gets exposed for it's own under the table, behind closed doors, lampshades drawn dealings. Either by a whistleblower, a malcontent not receiving his/her perceived fair share, or the ever lurking investigative journalist looking for their own proper career elevating moment. This can not be denied, and is rather elementary indeed.
    You make reference to the people you worked with being dedicated and self-sacrificing. I can not contest this, nor am I judging you or your specific time with the organization, but it obviously does not speak for everybody within such a large far reaching association.
    A good question to ask is if any NGO ever have solved a problem in the countries they have been posted in, cuz it is my impression as a layman that they are more often than not in the way for the hypothetical state in question ever doing so by its own. I have been a lurker in some Haitian forums for some time now, and if there is an issue in which they all seem to march lockstep in, is in their intense hatred/dislike of the NGOs' based in their country. Some have gone as far as putting them just as another racket with lots of influence, like the arms' lobby and big pharma, to put some examples.

  6. #55
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    Haiti is known as "the republic of NGOs" - and I think that one only has to look at the "success" of the rebuilding of Haiti after the earthquake vis a vis the amount of aid to see the effectiveness of foreign aid. 

    I was a big supporter of it before I went to the DR. Now I will not give one thin dime. If one just thinks about it - what organization would really work to alleviate the very condition which is the reason for its own existence?

    http://www.nytimes.com/1989/11/12/bo...-the-poor.html

  7. #56
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    One of my favorite stories was of reading a list serv about how the FAO (food and agriculture of the UN) had - after about 3 years of investigation- FINALLY come up with a bean that could grow in Haiti. They issued a press release from their HQ in somewhere or other - like say Costa Rica? -- about the exhaustive research they had done - not to upset the delicate eco system , etc etc etc...

    this announcement came at the same week as the bean farmers from Elias Pina were staging a protest about the lack of bagging and/or canning facilities up on the Haitian/Dominican border and how they were losing their bean crops because of it. The farmers had filled trucks with left over beans and drove them down the Santo Domingo and dumped them on the steps of the capital. Elias Pina is right on the Haitian border. 


     I really marveled at that one.

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  9. #57
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    Some may find my assertions of NGO's to be a bit harsh. Undeniably, they are. Rightfully so. Let us view the words of Priti Patel.....
    "These incidents (Haiti + Oxfam GB) were just the tip of the iceberg" and "there exists a culture of denial within the sector".
    Sounds to be spot-on.

  10. #58
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    that is not to take away from the "good intentions" of those who work in the non profit field. They are some of the loveliest people I have met. Most of them do indeed believe that they are making a difference to better the lives of the people on the ground. And certainly there are programs here and there which do indeed really make a difference - the micro enterprise programs - the banking programs - there are indeed some programs - such as Fonkose in Haiti - that work. https://www.fonkoze.org 

  11. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainannie View Post
    Haiti is known as "the republic of NGOs" - and I think that one only has to look at the "success" of the rebuilding of Haiti after the earthquake vis a vis the amount of aid to see the effectiveness of foreign aid.

    I was a big supporter of it before I went to the DR. Now I will not give one thin dime. If one just thinks about it - what organization would really work to alleviate the very condition which is the reason for its own existence?

    http://www.nytimes.com/1989/11/12/bo...-the-poor.html
    If NGO's eliminate the problem they purport to fix, they eliminate their reason to exist. And *any* bureaucracy's Prime Directive is the protection of the bureaucracy before all else...

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  13. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountainannie View Post
    One of my favorite stories was of reading a list serv about how the FAO (food and agriculture of the UN) had - after about 3 years of investigation- FINALLY come up with a bean that could grow in Haiti. They issued a press release from their HQ in somewhere or other - like say Costa Rica? -- about the exhaustive research they had done - not to upset the delicate eco system , etc etc etc...

    this announcement came at the same week as the bean farmers from Elias Pina were staging a protest about the lack of bagging and/or canning facilities up on the Haitian/Dominican border and how they were losing their bean crops because of it. The farmers had filled trucks with left over beans and drove them down the Santo Domingo and dumped them on the steps of the capital. Elias Pina is right on the Haitian border. 


     I really marveled at that one.
    But think of all the jobs, political loyalties and padded expense accounts were created for those three years of "research."

    The UN may be the most corrupt, inefficient bureaucracy on the planet. Even Jimah Cahtah would have had beans planted in just a few weeks.

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