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Thread: Santo Domingo Traffic may get a little better

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyexpat View Post
    I won't disagree that courtesy in driving isn't a problem but yes traffic volume is the main problem. Leaving the capital the last week I sat on JFK in traffic where it was like a parking lot. Courtesy or lack thereof didn't play a role. Getting rid of the Conchos will at least contribute to the solution (granted to a limited extent) in both traffic and lack of courtesy because they often times are the least courteous drivers on the road.
    I've driven the whole Maximo Gomez (and Hermanas Mirabal) from north of Villa Mella up until George Washington (Malecon) at the worst peak hours and at 6 in the morning... With lack of the carritos at out-of-the peak hours, the difference is huge. I've spent on the same route close to 3 hours on peak hours and less than 20 minutes outside of peak hours... While there may be always people on the roads (guaguas, carritos, whatever) who cannot drive (or can, but don't care), if there are less of them, the traffic moves more quickly...

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    Quote Originally Posted by cobraboy View Post
    If they can pull this off, I'll tip my hat.
    They won't, and it wouldn't change much anyway. There's just too many cars in Santo Domingo.

    The conchos are aggravating, but they pretty much keep to the right lane with their starting and stopping all the time.

    They need to prohibit the "voladora" buses on those main thoroughfares too; those guys are aggravating as heck.

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    Default Santo Domingo Traffic may get a little better

    In Santiago at estrella sadhala in front of bravo, is always bad. They push 6 lanes of traffic into 3 coming from autopista and the right line is always stopped for Concho, so it's 6 lanes going into 2.

    There is always always always an Amet, with his motorcycle parked in the right lane, just 20 feet in front of where the conchos stop, right in front of the sign that says "no pasajeros!"

    So effectively the Amet is blocking a lane when he could park on the sidewalk, and he's protecting the conchos who are breaking the traffic law and causing a huge part of the congestion.

    And don't drive there if you are overstaying a visa, he likes to pull over gringos

    I too hate Santo domingo traffic and I too want a motorcycle...but a real one, a 1,000 cc sport bike, not a 150cc bucket of parts without lights.

    They could solve the traffic problems overnight if they impounded and crushed every moto, Concho, guagua and camión that was overloaded and missing either all headlights or all brake lights.

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    Quote Originally Posted by josh2203 View Post
    I've driven the whole Maximo Gomez (and Hermanas Mirabal) from north of Villa Mella up until George Washington (Malecon) at the worst peak hours and at 6 in the morning... With lack of the carritos at out-of-the peak hours, the difference is huge. I've spent on the same route close to 3 hours on peak hours and less than 20 minutes outside of peak hours... While there may be always people on the roads (guaguas, carritos, whatever) who cannot drive (or can, but don't care), if there are less of them, the traffic moves more quickly...
    There isn't' a country with more vehicles moving at any time and busier than the USA. We manage to get to point A, B and C w/o the hassle rate at which occurs in the DR. Yes, the amount of vehicle is certainly cumbersome and something to address but, the main issue is the lack of understanding, courtesy and bad behavior of the drivers, passengers and people overall.

    A well educated populace reaches goals at steadfast paces, the DR isn't' anywhere close to this with an illiterately percent rate climbing as we speak and with the addition of Haitians, Venezuelans and other immigrants things are just going backwards education wide.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jahjahwarrior View Post
    In Santiago at estrella sadhala in front of bravo, is always bad. They push 6 lanes of traffic into 3 coming from autopista and the right line is always stopped for Concho, so it's 6 lanes going into 2.

    There is always always always an Amet, with his motorcycle parked in the right lane, just 20 feet in front of where the conchos stop, right in front of the sign that says "no pasajeros!"

    So effectively the Amet is blocking a lane when he could park on the sidewalk, and he's protecting the conchos who are breaking the traffic law and causing a huge part of the congestion.

    And don't drive there if you are overstaying a visa, he likes to pull over gringos

    I too hate Santo domingo traffic and I too want a motorcycle...but a real one, a 1,000 cc sport bike, not a 150cc bucket of parts without lights.

    They could solve the traffic problems overnight if they impounded and crushed every moto, Concho, guagua and camión that was overloaded and missing either all headlights or all brake lights.
    One can dream, right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jahjahwarrior View Post
    In Santiago at estrella sadhala in front of bravo, is always bad. They push 6 lanes of traffic into 3 coming from autopista and the right line is always stopped for Concho, so it's 6 lanes going into 2.
    .
    This is exactly the problem, not caring for laws, others and just for themselves.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyexpat View Post
    traffic volume is the main problem. Leaving the capital the last week I sat on JFK in traffic where it was like a parking lot.
    They should institute pico y placa. Exception given to taxis, and registered transport vehicles such as Uber/Taxify, rent car etc.

    Pico y placa works well even in smaller Colombian cities such as Pereira, Armenia, etc.

    That would instantly take about half of personal vehicles off the roads.

    Capitaleños would learn to use public transport more, it could even provide initiative to new ventures and startups, be that both for new transport companies offering decent airconditioned buses where you travel not like in a sardine can (the bank branch manager would not travel in a guagua with a plastic wrap instead of the window with 5 people seated on 3 seats) and new apps/projects like ride share in private vehicles etc.

    And for the the rest of us non-capitaleños, we would simply plan a visit to SD on an appropriate day... or go in bus and take Uber (which would become instantly cheaper proposition even for multiple errands than today because of reduced traffic, thus the time factor of the rate would become cheaper).
    Last edited by rubio_higuey; 02-14-2018 at 07:25 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonD View Post
    This is exactly the problem, not caring for laws, others and just for themselves.
    More appropriately, lack of education.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rubio_higuey View Post
    They should institute pico y placa. Exception given to taxis, and registered transport vehicles such as Uber/Taxify, rent car etc.

    Pico y placa works well even in smaller Colombian cities such as Pereira, Armenia, etc.

    That would instantly take about half of personal vehicles off the roads.

    Capitaleños would learn to use public transport more, it could even provide initiative to new ventures and startups, be that both for new transport companies offering decent airconditioned buses where you travel not like in a sardine can (the bank branch manager would not travel in a guagua with a plastic wrap instead of the window with 5 people seated on 3 seats) and new apps/projects like ride share in private vehicles etc.

    And for the the rest of us non-capitaleños, we would simply plan a visit to SD on an appropriate day... or go in bus and take Uber (which would become instantly cheaper proposition even for multiple errands than today because of reduced traffic, thus the time factor of the rate would become cheaper).
    Already tried that years ago. Same thing as the green/yellow painted roof vehicles. Some guys have roofs with both colors. That didn't work either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rubio_higuey View Post
    They should institute pico y placa. Exception given to taxis, and registered transport vehicles such as Uber/Taxify, rent car etc.

    Pico y placa works well even in smaller Colombian cities such as Pereira, Armenia, etc.

    That would instantly take about half of personal vehicles off the roads.

    Capitaleños would learn to use public transport more, it could even provide initiative to new ventures and startups, be that both for new transport companies offering decent airconditioned buses where you travel not like in a sardine can (the bank branch manager would not travel in a guagua with a plastic wrap instead of the window with 5 people seated on 3 seats) and new apps/projects like ride share in private vehicles etc.

    And for the the rest of us non-capitaleños, we would simply plan a visit to SD on an appropriate day... or go in bus and take Uber (which would become instantly cheaper proposition even for multiple errands than today because of reduced traffic, thus the time factor of the rate would become cheaper).
    I was recently in Santa Marta Colombia where they also have that in effect. If you are caught on the road on an off day you not only pay a stiff fine but they also impound your car so you have to pay tow and impound as well. Not many people test it resulting in more passable roads.

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