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Thread: Plastic wave horror film

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    Default Plastic wave horror film

    These images are being shared in social media and making headlines in mainstream media. It could have a devastating effect on the tourism industry. Anyone who knows the DR will recognise the location: not tourist beaches as implied by some reports, but the Santo Domingo shoreline near the mouth of the Ozama River.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-44...nican-republic

    Following the recent storm (Beryl) the waste was swept down the river, which is lined with poor neighbourhoods with inadequate or nonexistent drainage and waste collection systems, and a culture where casual littering is still acceptable.

    It's been several decades since city beaches like Montesinos and Guibia were regularly used by swimmers. Even so, the Malecon seafront boulevard of Santo Domingo is being promoted as a cultural tourist attraction along with the Colonial city, which is also near the river mouth. This is just round the corner from the cruise ship terminal (cruise ship tourism being one of the most polluting models of tourism, but that’s a separate issue).

    Across all social classes, single-use plastic and Styrofoam is overused and discarded every day: bottles, cups, plates, cutlery, plastic bags, and takeaway food containers.

    Over in the tourist areas obscene amounts of plastic waste are generated: thousands of plastic bottles and cups are used and discarded in the resorts every day. Although there are some honourable exceptions like the Grupo Puntacana initiatives where a good proportion of the waste generated is collected, separated and recycled, even when these plastic and foam items are disposed of systematically and responsibly, most still end up in landfill, open-air dumps, or floating in the sea.

    The Ministry of Tourism with its stated goal of 10 million tourists must legislate and – more importantly - enforce new standards on plastics and waste management, and the tourist industry should take its own initiative to reduce single-use plastics to an absolute minimum in resorts, hotels, restaurants, cafes and bars.

    A small restaurant in Santo Domingo, Para Te, is one example - from now on they will only serve drinking water in glasses and are offering a discount to takeaway customers who bring their own containers:
    para te1.jpg para te2.jpg

    More education and enforcement of penalties is needed to stop taxi and bus drivers from littering their rest areas-a common but shocking sight along the roads and highways-which discourages many visitors from ever wanting to return.
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkwCENQLIwk

    Several on youtube. If someone wants to open this for easy viewing, that would be fine. Thanks.

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    Maybe the media exposure will force the mayor of Santo Domingo and environmental officials to get on board and recognize the huge problem that lack of education of the populous and lack of provision of receptacles has caused over an extended period of time.

    That amount of basura is a result of years of dumping of styrofoam containers and recyclable wastes into the river. One can’t blame this only on poor neighbourhoods. This is a community effort of dumping wastes. It is the mentality of lo echo al río. Did these people ever stop to think that once they toss their garbage where does it go and if a significant amount of people do the same what are the consequences.

    It is all coming back to them and it should not have been dumped in the first place. BBC Mundo also has a very good article and video of Río Osama and the mess that has been washed up. It’s not only styrofoam and recyclable wastes but also clothes and dead animals as per the article.

    The DR is so behind when it comes to trash and disposal of wastes. This is a country that likes to promote its beaches as it drives tourism dollars but has insufficient resources for trash removal and recycling campaigns for the population.

    Recycling campaigns take years to become effective. They started seriously in the eighties in many developed nations and progressed very slowly. Now in the 21st in said countries the concept of recycling has become the norm. You have different types of recycling bins available in public places and people separate their trash accordingly for the most part. The DR has a huge task at hand and it’s not even starting with recycling. From what I have seen in SD, Puerto Plata and AZS the first step is telling people no botes tu basura. If they start with that simple concept then start the education about recycling and refraining from using styrofoam and other environmentally damaging products they may make slow progress.


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    Quote Originally Posted by DR Solar View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkwCENQLIwk

    Several on youtube. If someone wants to open this for easy viewing, that would be fine. Thanks.
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    Be Serious

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    https://issuu.com/jona1509/docs/revista_sobre_la_basura It takes enforcement, education, punishment for offenders, a massive cleanup project countrywide, a door-to-door campaign, and a lot more public garbage containers and garbage drop-off points that are cleaned daily. It is simply amazing that people that keep their bodies clean, their cars clean, and their houses clean will just sweep the garbage on the street into the storm sewers. A million plus extras from Haiti doesn't help either. A couple of co-generation plans would really help as well.

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    y on FB.. everyone who knew I traveled to the DR, and who had never been there was asking " are ALL the beaches like this ? . " did you know about this " " have you seen this, is this anywhere near where you go" ? ....
    It apparently went absolutely VIRAL on Facebook ..
    this is NOT good For DR Tourism ... They need to clean this isht up, and pronto,, no matter what the cost ..

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    Quote Originally Posted by jd426 View Post
    y on FB.. everyone who knew I traveled to the DR, and who had never been there was asking " are ALL the beaches like this ? . " did you know about this " " have you seen this, is this anywhere near where you go" ? ....
    It apparently went absolutely VIRAL on Facebook ..
    this is NOT good For DR Tourism ... They need to clean this isht up, and pronto,, no matter what the cost ..
    Not good at all. I sympathize with Santo Domingo, because this garbage came to them from their neighbors up river, but it’s left to them to clean up. Hundreds (some reports said over a thousand) of city employees and volunteers are cleaning up the mess, it’s a daunting job.

    For those who do not know, this is not the norm for that area. I can only imagine what potential tourists are thinking........




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    Here is a good article in LD today.


    There is a law in place since 1999 established by ex president Fernández.

    It is quite clear:


    En República Dominicana está prohibido tirar basura en calles, aceras, contenes, parques, carreteras, caminos, balnearios, mares, ríos, cañadas, arroyos y canales de riego, playas, plazas y otros sitios de esparcimiento y demás lugares públicos.

    La ley prohíbe a los a los propietarios e inquilinos de hogares y establecimientos comerciales sacar basura, desechos o desperdicios en horas distintas a las establecidas por los ayuntamientos.

    Like many laws in the DR it is the issue of reinforcement and education.


    Now even though SD is getting a negative image because of this mess that has washed up it just goes to show you the impact it has nationally. The people need to understand that your garbage is everyone's garbage.


    They need a short term solution before they can even consider a long term plan. That amount of trash and waste will lead to other sanitary issues.

    https://www.listindiario.com/la-repu...areas-publicas



    -MP.
    Last edited by Marianopolita; 07-22-2018 at 11:26 AM.

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    Not only Fayboo... DW TV News for an example did bring the story yesterday also...
    https://www.dw.com/de/dominikanische...ll/av-44774814

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    Maybe the media exposure will force the mayor of Santo Domingo and environmental officials to get on board and recognize the huge problem that lack of education of the populous and lack of provision of receptacles has caused over an extended period of time.
    I hope that this happens too. In fact there are some waste management and public education programmes under way in some of those riverside barrios but their coverage is nowhere near enough.

    In my experience over 20 years in the DR I do think people are a bit more conscious when it comes to littering but clearly not enough either, and if there has been any increase in awareness about waste disposal it has happened at the same time as the steep rise in the use of disposables.

    That's why I'd like the Para Te initiative to get more exposure because it's the best way to approach this.
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