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Thread: Preserving Black American History In Samana NY Times

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    Default Preserving Black American History In Samana NY Times

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/30/t...-republic.html

    Great article on history of Samana and the DR.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SKY View Post
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/30/t...-republic.html

    Great article on history of Samana and the DR.
    thanks for that.- notice that the two young men in the picture near the end of the article have english last names.

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    that was a great read, thanks

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    I always thought a small museum focused on this migration would be nice in Samana, but assimilating them into the mainstream Dominican is correct. I know Americans value multiculturalism above assimilation, but that’s an American cultural belief. It isn’t the main cultural belief in most societies, DR included. In fact, one of the reasons why most AA’s that migrated in the 1820’s eventually left the island was due to the pressure they received from the Haitian government to culturally Haitianize.

    As for the article, it’s ok. I get the feeling it wants to make it seem as if the Dominican population rejected them, when in reality most of the AA’s that stayed melted into the general Dominican population through intermarriage. Everywhere else where they were settled (Santo Domingo, Santiago, Puerto Plata, etc) already had a large Dominican population and the fact they were never segregated or sigmatized to prevent mixture says more about acceptance than anything else.

    Samana was never a major population center and in the 1820’s there was a handful of Dominican families of mainly Spanish Canarian descent living on the peninsula, mostly around Samana town. The AA’s quickly outnumbered them and settled mostly in the eastern part of the peninsula, which was devoid of people. Those two conditions alone explains why that colony was able to maintain their original AA culture while the rest of the colonies melted through widespread acceptance.

    The fact that the AA’s in general supported the Dominicans during the independence uprising also helped in their acceptance by the Dominicans, a remarkable thing considering it was the Haitian government that invited and settled them on Dominican territory. Their support of Dominicans also says a lot about the oppressive treatment the Haitian military gave the Dominican population.

    As for the actions of Trujillo, it had nothing to do with rejection of them as a people and more to do with the fact that he toured the entire country on horse back and the eastern part of Samana peninsula was the only place in the entire country that didn’t feel Dominican. This was mostly due to the insignificant Spanish culture among the AA’s due to their origin in the USA (English-based). The predominant language was not Spanish, the predominant religion was not Roman Catholic, the predominant foods/dishes were not derived from Spanish dishes, the music wasn’t either; in essence, the only Dominican aspect was the land. The AA’s had two choices, Dominicanize or leave the country. Notice they were never expelled, no massacre attempts, and basically no hostility to them personally. Their culture was also a reminder of when Haiti wanted to destroy the entire Dominican society and customs. Assimilation was the main objective.

    BTW, a little known fact is that the president of the Constitutional Tribunal is in part a descendant of the AA’s from Samana.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NALs View Post
    I always thought a small museum focused on this migration would be nice in Samana, but assimilating them into the mainstream Dominican is correct. I know Americans value multiculturalism above assimilation, but that’s an American cultural belief. It isn’t the main cultural belief in most societies, DR included.

    As for the article, it’s ok. I get the feeling it wants to make it seem as if the Dominican population rejected them, when in reality most of the AA’s that stayed melted into the general Dominican population through intermarriage. Everywhere else where they were settled (Santo Domingo, Santiago, Puerto Plata, etc) already had a large Dominican population and the fact they were never segregated or sigmatized to prevent mixture says more about acceptance than anything else.

    Samana was never a major population center and in the 1820’s there was a handful of Dominican families of mainly Spanish Canarian descent living on the peninsula, mostly around Samana town. The AA’s quickly outnumbered them and settled mostly in the eastern part of the peninsula, which was devoid of people. Those two conditions alone explains why that colony was able to maintain their original AA culture while the rest of the colonies melted through widespread acceptance.

    The fact that the AA’s in general supported the Dominicans during the independence uprising also helped in their acceptance by the Dominicans, a remarkable thing considering it was the Haitian government that invited and settled them on Dominican territory. Their support of Dominicans also says a lot about the oppressive treatment the Haitian military gave the Dominican population.

    As for the actions of Trujillo, it had nothing to do with rejection of them as a people and more to do with the fact that he toured the entire country on horse back and the eastern part of Samana peninsula was the only place in the entire country that didn’t feel Dominican. This was mostly due to the insignificant Spanish culture among the AA’s due to their origin in the USA (English-based). The predominant language was not Spanish, the predominant religion was not Roman Catholic, the predominant foods/dishes were not derived from Spanish dishes, the music wasn’t either; in essence, the only Dominican aspect was the land. The AA’s had two choices, Dominicanize or leave the country. Notice they were never expelled, no massacre attempts, and basically no hostility to them personally. Their culture was also a reminder of when Haiti wanted to destroy the entire Dominican society and customs. Assimilation was the main objective.

    BTW, a little known fact is that the president of the Constitutional Tribunal is in part a descendant of the AA’s from Samana.

    Not to mention that Samana back then was pretty remote and cut off from the rest of the country.

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    Quote Originally Posted by the gorgon View Post
    thanks for that.- notice that the two young men in the picture near the end of the article have english last names.
    Im glad you mentioned this. Ive always wondered why a couple of my exes had english last names (and they dont speak a lick of english). Like black american last names. It all makes sense now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alexw View Post
    Im glad you mentioned this. Ive always wondered why a couple of my exes had english last names (and they dont speak a lick of english). Like black american last names. It all makes sense now.
    If they are from San Pedro or La Romana their English last names most likely arrived from the English Caribbean and not from USA.

    If they are from the Puerto Plata or Santo Domingo areas there’s a greater chance it could be from the USA, but those places also received significant migration from the English Caribbean too.

    English last names from the Cibao Valley or most places away from the coast are almost always of US origin.

    The only place an English last name is almost certainly of US origin is in Samana because Cocolos never settled there, they did so wherever there’s sugar cane plantations.
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    Quote Originally Posted by NALs View Post
    If they are from San Pedro or La Romana their English last names most likely arrived from the English Caribbean and not from USA.

    If they are from the Puerto Plata or Santo Domingo areas there’s a greater chance it could be from the USA, but those places also received significant migration from the English Caribbean too.

    English last names from the Cibao Valley or most places away from the coast are almost always of US origin.

    The only place an English last name is almost certainly of US origin is in Samana because Cocolos never settled there, they did so wherever there’s sugar cane plantations.
    while you are explaining all this, please explain why the only two places i have been able to buy janikekes are Samana and San Pedro....

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    Quote Originally Posted by the gorgon View Post
    while you are explaining all this, please explain why the only two places i have been able to buy janikekes are Samana and San Pedro....
    You’re serious? They’re sold at every beach I’ve been to on the south coast. Always a lady with a “fritura”. 25 pesos at the beaches in SanCristobal. I never realized this is unusual.




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    Quote Originally Posted by the gorgon View Post
    while you are explaining all this, please explain why the only two places i have been able to buy janikekes are Samana and San Pedro....
    And Barahona and Boca Chica and by the way your chilli was out of this world! Had to use red wine as no beer but was fab.

    Matilda


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