Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456
Results 51 to 60 of 60

Thread: Ex-Pat Fatigue

  1. #51
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    14,230
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by windeguy View Post
    It is not about posts, that would be about connections to those that satisfy your requirements.
    I have my list as well, that is for sure. The problems come up when the excellent plumber moves back to Switzerland, etc.
    I used to observe how the work got done in Las Terrenas - It took 2 Haitians to do the job, 4 Dominicans to stand around supervising, and 1 Frenchman to send the bill.

    I had a very good friend who was in LT for many years -maybe 15?- and had established a full legal business - paid taxes, salaries, and all - kept a full Dominican crew working (and even on salary when there was no actual work) trained them. He did solar panel design and installation. When he left, he turned over the business to his crew.

    I doubt it is is still in operation.

  2. Dislikes dalethefarmer disliked this post
  3. #52
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    14,230
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by william webster View Post
    This is talked about elsewhere in the world but I think we all know waht it is....

    My best cure is an airport..


    Agreed - we all get 'worn down, short tempered.. fact of life in the 3rd (OK 2.5) world

    But then, when you least expect , along comes a nice pick-me-up

    I had one this afternoon

    WIFE'S CAR
    needed the annual oil/filter change and tire rotation... ordinary stuff
    I have a man in RSJ who does mine - Javier by name... fluent English

    You would have thought I was Jackie Stewart in an F1 race...
    In/Out in 15-20 minutes.

    Oil/Filter/Labor 1400 pesos
    Tires flipped 200
    Done like dinner

    Not even time to fetch a beer across the street

    Sometimes life's easy here
    When I would get stressed in the Capital I would check into one of the All INclusives for a mid-week SPA trip-

    These were particularly lovely in the rainy season and summers when there were few foreign tourists and Dominicans only on the weekend...

    The rates were amazingly low.

    If I could go with someone with a cedula, the rates were really - REALLY low

    I never felt that a trip back to the US was much of "stress reliever" - I travelled back for about 3 months a year for the first 3 years during the beginning of my 14 years there- kept a car at my nephew's place. But then I started to figure that in those months I spent about what an entire year cost me in the DR and instead spent the money on round trip tickets for various folks to come visit me. When they came, I would get a week's "vacation" as a tourist - showing them around the Zona Colonial, up to Las Terrenas or down to Pedernales. There is SO MUCH to see in the Dominican Republic. So many places that most folks never see.

    If you have never been to the high pine forest outside of Pedernales? Which is like Canada? And actually gone on the back of a MotoConcho? Well- I can not say that you have never Lived - but you have certainly missed something.

    There is an adorable hotel right near the border- near Elias Pina - outside of San Juan de Maguana - which is a high plateau and the weather is beautiful. It has a great swimming pool and owned by a Haitian (or at least it was) who has an AMAZING chef..

    If you get a new copy of the Lonely Planet guide to the DR - or the Moon Guide from the UK - or the French guide (I forget the name ) you will get the most recent listings of all the adorable little hotels that are always opening (and some closing)...

    For those of you who can actually afford a trip back to the USA, it will be much cheaper to send a ticket to a kid, a grandchild, nephew, niece, old friend - and travel about the DR with them.

  4. Likes jinty05 liked this post
  5. #53
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    114
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks everyone. This is all great info for someone relocating to LT in 20 months. I understand the biggest risk to relocation is simply cultural adjustment. It is nearly impossible for some, and a serious consideration for all. I think my wife and I have fairly reasonable expectations; but, the conversation about it all is priceless.

  6. Likes mountainannie liked this post
  7. #54
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    20,704
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mountainannie View Post
    I used to observe how the work got done in Las Terrenas - It took 2 Haitians to do the job, 4 Dominicans to stand around supervising, and 1 Frenchman to send the bill.

    I had a very good friend who was in LT for many years -maybe 15?- and had established a full legal business - paid taxes, salaries, and all - kept a full Dominican crew working (and even on salary when there was no actual work) trained them. He did solar panel design and installation. When he left, he turned over the business to his crew.

    I doubt it is is still in operation.
    reillyp ??

  8. #55
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    14,230
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by william webster View Post
    reillyp ??

    no - Emmanuel Melleat

  9. #56
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    14,230
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RockyM View Post
    Thanks everyone. This is all great info for someone relocating to LT in 20 months. I understand the biggest risk to relocation is simply cultural adjustment. It is nearly impossible for some, and a serious consideration for all. I think my wife and I have fairly reasonable expectations; but, the conversation about it all is priceless.
    I lived in LT for my first 2 or 3 years (they sorta flow together there) - made some really LIFE long friends. It has so many advantages in that it is really an international destination and there are expats from all over. Before I got there I expected it to be this wonderful melange but the reality on the ground was that they were quite segregated into the French colony, the Italian colony, the Germans.., etc.. which makes for some wonderful restaurants! Once your Spanish is up to speed you will be able to make friends with lots of others. There is a big environmental group which holds 5k runs and stuff and a sweet open market in the main shopping plaza on Saturdays which also gives one a good opportunity to mix with others.

    The main drawback of LT - as it perhaps is with all the other towns in the DR - is that it is a town. The shoeshine boys will know that you have moved from one side of the village to the other within a day. Everything that you do/say will be monitored and seen by the locals.

    LT is a deeply religious and Protestant village and there are also lots of folks there who are hiding out from Interpol for one reason or another - which certainly makes for an interesting mix. Like all the other places, there is no way to know the back story of any of the other ex-pats - there are lots who live quite mysteriously on wealth that comes from who knows where. Some of the lawyers there - and else where in the DR - are so crooked that they would make a wonderful series on Netflix (stick with Guzman Arias)

    The other down side on LT is that it is a long way from anywhere - not as far as it was when I first got there before the Samana highway. There are now regular buses to the Capital. If you are primarily an English speaker - Canadian/Brit/USA - you will be in the minority of the ex-pats there. You might want to make an effort to meet some of the posters on this board who live elsewhere along the North Coast so that you can visit with them and get around more native English speakers should you wish to watch old Monty Python movies or the Super Bowl.

    All in all - LT is about the most gorgeous place on the entire island, imho..

    and I was there for 14 years working as a journalist and have probably seen more of the island than most.

  10. Likes jinty05 liked this post
  11. #57
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    114
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks mountainannie, we are headed back to LT in April. Been there 5 or 6 times in total. Met some great people, but yes, all North Americans! Our friends also advise us that the locals are VERY social and will know us and everything we do before long! We do like that it is off the beaten track so to speak. Kind of a pain getting there but is a acceptable trade off. :0)

  12. #58
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    27,908
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    There is nothing unusual about immigrants from different countries hanging together with their fellow countrymen. It tends to happen for at least a couple of generations until the grand children and great grand kids of the immigrants mix together in larger numbers over time. There are plenty of examples of this from the enclaves found in the world's largest cities to even my home town of 30,000 people. Chinatowns, Little Italy's, Pollack Hill, etc.

    I hate to say it, but it happens everywhere.

    As for LT, I went there once and may not visit again. Others really like it there.

  13. Likes mobrouser liked this post
  14. #59
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    14,230
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RockyM View Post
    Thanks mountainannie, we are headed back to LT in April. Been there 5 or 6 times in total. Met some great people, but yes, all North Americans! Our friends also advise us that the locals are VERY social and will know us and everything we do before long! We do like that it is off the beaten track so to speak. Kind of a pain getting there but is a acceptable trade off. :0)
    Glad to hear that there are more North Americans there now - I got there way back in 2004 and there were really only 3 of us United Staters and no Canadians that I met. The Village only had two paved roads. So you will have a much easier time of it.

  15. #60
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    574
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    best stress reliever is a few chica"s and and couple of whiskys works for me

Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst ... 456

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •