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Thread: Rethinking Permanent Residency

  1. #1
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    Default Rethinking Permanent Residency

    My husband and I started our residency journey in 2013/2014. Just yesterday we transitioned from the temporary to the "permanent" RP-1 residency card. Each year it's a hassle. Dealing with the idiots at Migracion makes my blood boil. For the past 3 years they have screwed something up and we've had to spend a night in SD to return the next day to complete the task.

    We no longer are living full-time in the DR. We are splitting our time between the US and the DR. (We are not of retirement age yet so still have flexible full-time jobs in the US).

    We went down the residency path because we thought it would make things easier for us to come and go and since we have bank accounts and own property it seemed prudent to have "legal" status in the country.

    With all that said, I'm having second thoughts. This yearly renewal business is f*%king insane. So we just got our first RP-1 card that expires in a year. We will then have to renew in 2020 and get a 2-year card. Then in 2022 renew yet again!!! WTF.

    Honest question here. Does anyone know exactly what purpose the yearly renewals serve? I'm serious here... we all think it's stupid and pointless but someone actually sat down and wrote these laws. What problem were they fixing. It is really as simple as it's just a money-grab?


    Is it really worth it?
    Last edited by InsanelyOne; 02-15-2019 at 10:07 AM. Reason: typo

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  3. #2
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    The yearly renewal serves the Governments right to extract more money from you. No other reason..................Stay off the merry go round unless you intend to get Citizenship eventually.

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  5. #3
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    I cannot answer your question but do sympathize. We will start the same residency journey next year and will most likely hire and attorney. It's a gut punch to pay the attorney so much money; but, we would otherwise go insane trying to get through it.

  6. #4
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    Your original thinking is laudable. The fact that you do not live here full time changes things a bit. Yes the renewals are a hassle, but as with anywhere else, the rules whatever they may be are the rules. I think a reasonable person that lives in the DR full time, can take comfort in being legal - one less potential problem someday.

    The way the system works now, unless you apply for residency as a retired person/investor, going straight to permanent (yeah right) status, and actually live here more than elsewhere, it may not be worth the hassle to get temporary residency and climb that ladder for six or seven years.

    For those residents who are not classified as pensioners/investors clearly the govt wishes to keep close tabs on you and likes to see you every year until you satisfy them with your intentions, economic suitability and propensity to remain conviction free.

    Sure a lot of it is about the fees that people have to pay but there is some element of data gathering and control mixed in as well. The govt just hasn't figured out how and when to use the data it collects nor have they figured out that their definition of permanent is completely opposite of how most define that word.

    You've come this far for so long, that to quit now might not be the most prudent option. After next year, it's every two years and that renewal schedule is 100% better than what you have suffered through all these years.

    Like you, I am loathe to endure the foolishness. I pay someone to do all that for me. All I have to do is show up when told, and get it all done in a day. All it takes is me emailing some documents to my person and of course paying, but that's it.

    Yeah, if I had to renew every year and do the whole thing myself, I doubt I would have lasted this long just because I don't need to suffer a process that poisons me against where I wish to live and I really, really, really hate the bus ride to SD.

  7. #5
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    You probably qualify for citizenship soon. Have you looked into that?

  8. #6
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    When do you qualify for four-year residency?

    The issue with the citizenship route from the US perspective...someone correct me if I have it wrong...is the US does not recognize dual-citizenship except is certain situations like marriage. If you do not qualify for an exception, you have to surrender your US citizenship.

    Maybe playacaribe2 can offer his legal perspective since he's dealt with both sides.
    Cabin Attendant,
    Augusto Pinochet Helicopter Tours

  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobraboy View Post
    When do you qualify for four-year residency?

    The issue with the citizenship route from the US perspective...someone correct me if I have it wrong...is the US does not recognize dual-citizenship except is certain situations like marriage. If you do not qualify for an exception, you have to surrender your US citizenship.

    Maybe playacaribe2 can offer his legal perspective since he's dealt with both sides.
    Absolutely wrong. I hold dual Citizenship in the DR and US, born in the US. The US allows this and you get no problem of any kind from the US or the
    DR. And I am nor nor have ever been married to a Dominican.

  10. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobraboy View Post
    When do you qualify for four-year residency?

    The issue with the citizenship route from the US perspective...someone correct me if I have it wrong...is the US does not recognize dual-citizenship except is certain situations like marriage. If you do not qualify for an exception, you have to surrender your US citizenship.
    Methinks you are wrong.

    U.S. law does not mention dual nationality or require a person to choose one nationality or another. A U.S. citizen may naturalize in a foreign state without any risk to his or her U.S. citizenship. ... Dual nationals owe allegiance to both the United States and the foreign country.
    Dual Nationality - Bureau of Consular Affairs - Department of State
    https://travel.state.gov/...of-US-Na...tionality.html

    Matilda


    Moderator Ladies Only Forum
    www.DR1.com

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  12. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by cobraboy View Post
    When do you qualify for four-year residency?

    The issue with the citizenship route from the US perspective...someone correct me if I have it wrong...is the US does not recognize dual-citizenship except is certain situations like marriage. If you do not qualify for an exception, you have to surrender your US citizenship.

    Maybe playacaribe2 can offer his legal perspective since he's dealt with both sides.
    The US has never formally recognized dual citizens. But on the other hand, they have taken no official stand against it.

    Lots of US citizens are dual citizens.

    One important point for those of you who are legal residents and or also citizens of the DR, and are also US citizens.

    If you need or request certain intervention assistance from the US embassy based on your US citizenship, be aware that because of your status as a resident or citizen of the DR, they may decline to intercede based on the fact that you are a resident or citizen of the DR and should avail yourself within their judicial structures.


    Respectfully,
    Playacaribe2

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  14. #10
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    Any American expecting help from the US Embassy will be greatly disappointed. You cannot get ice in the winter there. And Playa is totally wrong about them not intervening on your behalf. When I killed the guy that attacked me many years ago in Sosua. Bill Kirkman came to the Police Station as a Rep from the US to help. Never gave him a chance though, as my lawyer chased him.

    We did fine without the Embassy help.

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