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Thread: Swim Safety

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uzin View Post
    This is a total misconception that if you can swim you are safe in the sea and rivers. I know personally of a few people who drowned in sea and river being excellent swimmers, mainly due to currents, waves add to that panic plus fatigue or cramp.

    In the river (actually near a dam) two close friends of family drowned, both had taken part in swimming competitions when younger, everyone baffled (not drunk or on drugs, middle-aged men), the verdict was a combination of undercurrent, mud and underwater weeds/plant dragging them under...

    My uncle was a lifeguard on a beach that had rough waters on some days, he lost count of people who lost their lives being good swimmers, but tourists, just going in without knowledge of the sea and currents, panic and get tired, lifeguards couldn't even find them for hours or days. You might say these lifeguards weren't any good then, but the problem was people wouldn't listen to warnings and go in at non-designated area, away from lifeguards, and in rough sea - there was no Jet-ski in old days...!

    Don't think just because you can swim a few meters you are safe, always check with locals, ask where is okay and see where other people swim....
    Low head dams, where the water flows over the top and drops straight down, are killers, very dangerous. There is a circular current at these dams. The water at the top has a strong current back toward the dam, and then, at the dam, goes down a few feet, turns out away from the dam for a good distance, then comes up to the surface and heads back towards the dam. This current is sometimes called a roller. There are only two ways out of a roller and you must be a strong swimmer for either. If there is a considerable distance between the water fall and where the back flow starts you can try to swim out the side of the current or at the waterfall you can try to swim down under the roller, the water at the bottom will take you past the roller to whatever dangers there are beyond. The latter is very difficult to do with a PFD (personal flotation device). Some of these currents are so strong that even powerful boats have trouble escaping. Neither of these methods are well known by strong swimmers and neither is something that you would want to practice.

  2. #32
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    It is not just swimming that gets people in trouble in the water.
    Over exertion puts one out of breath and gasping for air.
    All that is needed to survive in most cases is breath control. As long as your lungs are full most people float head out of the water. A very few are so lean that they will sink, air in the lungs or no.
    People struggle to get back to shore, struggle in hi waves or struggle against the current. Next comes panic quickly followed by gasping from the over exertion.
    If you just relax, take deep slow breaths and float most will be fine.
    Unless your are going over a water fall. Then its time to panic.

  3. Likes wuarhat, NanSanPedro, jinty05 liked this post
  4. #33
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    Learning what they call rest strokes (side, back, and breast) with lots of glide is very useful. I find the backstroke the most restful, but you have to turn around and do one of the other two to see where you are going every now and then.

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  6. #34
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    I think the term is oxygen debt.
    It's when you exert yourself to the point of rapid breathing.
    Scuba divers get into trouble the same way.
    It's eze does it in the water.

  7. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoomzx11 View Post
    It is not just swimming that gets people in trouble in the water.
    Over exertion puts one out of breath and gasping for air.
    All that is needed to survive in most cases is breath control. As long as your lungs are full most people float head out of the water. A very few are so lean that they will sink, air in the lungs or no.
    People struggle to get back to shore, struggle in hi waves or struggle against the current. Next comes panic quickly followed by gasping from the over exertion.
    If you just relax, take deep slow breaths and float most will be fine.
    Unless your are going over a water fall. Then its time to panic.
    This applies to Salt Water mostly...
    Fresh water you dont float.. Unless you keep moving you will sink.. No such thing as taking a NAP floating on Fresh water like in the Ocean, in Calm water .
    Also Rivers are sometimes very turbulent, completely different from like a Rip Tide in the Ocean which is relatively easy to get out of if you stay calm & follow basic rules .
    .. Have seen plenty of good swimmers get into trouble in Fresh water . Saw one guy almost Drown while wearing a Flotation Vest ..
    Freshwater Rivers are possibly one of the most Dangerous places to swim .
    When I was a young Lad, we lived near a River which claimed a lot of lives .. Lots of people drowned .
    Never underestimate the Power of fast Moving water .
    just my .02

  8. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by wuarhat View Post
    Learning what they call rest strokes (side, back, and breast) with lots of glide is very useful. I find the backstroke the most restful, but you have to turn around and do one of the other two to see where you are going every now and then.
    Or put a mirror in your mouth.

  9. #37
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    As posted earlier, alcohol has drowned many a good men here. In Cab every now and then you hear of a tourist drowning in the rough surf on the west and east sides of Cab bay where the water is more unpredictable. As far as swimming in the rivers, you're more apt to contract a waterborne diseases.

  10. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by SKY View Post
    I have always been amazed at the lack of most Dominicans to learn how to swim. After all we are on an Island surrounded by water.
    ...from what I have seen most of the Dominicans that can swim...are the ones who work with the tourists...........

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