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  1. #31
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    Naci y vivi en sudamerica hasta my early 20's.

    This my first contribution to DR1, hope

    Como estas? la letra "s" implica el tu, esto lo usamos en conversaciones con amigos, familia, conversaciones diarias, etc.
    Como esta? implica usted, mas formal.
    Como esta usted? recontra formal, por ejemplo, con el presidente de tu compañia, si quieres causar una muy buena impresion.

    Marianopolita como estas? - confianza, que te conozco o te considero un igual.
    Marianopolita como esta? - recien te conozco y/o eres bastante mayor que , o eres mu jefe(a), etc
    Marianopolita como esta usted? es un poco mas formal.

    Hoy en dia el 90% de las conversaciones de una persona comun es mas desentendida, informal.

    Mi idioma de nacimiento es el español y yo uso como estas?, casi nunca "Tu", no recuerdo la vez que use"tu"
    Como esta? o como esta usted? como señal de respeto, ejm, personas mayores.


    Como estan? la letra "n" iimplica ellos(usetedes), lo usamos si le preguntas a 2 o mas personas.

    Marianopolita y AE como estan?

    T
    Resumen:
    Si usas "tu" lo mas probable es que el español es tu segunda lengua y la aprendiste de adulto.
    Usted se usa en situaciones en la que quieres dar a entender que respetas a la persona o la posicion de la persona.

    Anyway, these are my two cents.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by trynity99 View Post
    Naci y vivi en sudamerica hasta my early 20's.
    How does that work

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Rey de Mangu View Post
    How does that work
    What do you mean?

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by trynity99 View Post
    What do you mean?
    Sorry trynity, I was going to ask what regions, and I was typing to my mother in messenger lol

  5. #35
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    Ok, Peru, now i live in New York city.

  6. Likes El Rey de Mangu liked this post
  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    AE,


    A question for you. What or how do you feel when you are addressed in Spanish? Are you expecting the formal or informal? Does it have an impact? Do you feel the difference with the two forms of address?



    -MP.
    As you know, we live in the campo. The people there all call me Dona or Señora and use Ud. I’m a very informal person, and I struggle to remind myself to use Ud. I spend a lot of time with extended family, and it’s tu all the way, them and me.

    Yes, I do feel the difference.




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    DR1.com

  8. #37
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    I dislike usted as it goes against my nature to consider anyone an inferior or a superior. I'm almost always taken aback when someone of any age/status addresses me as usted.

    I recognise the value of using usted to show respect but only up to a point. I try to show respect by listening to the person, letting them finish a sentence, and not talking over them, which a lot of people who painstakingly use the conventions of usted, don/doña, señor/a and other courtesies don't always bother with.
    Moderator East Coast Forum


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  10. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by trynity99 View Post
    Resumen:
    Si usas "tu" lo mas probable es que el español es tu segunda lengua y la aprendiste de adulto.
    Usted se usa en situaciones en la que quieres dar a entender que respetas a la persona o la posicion de la persona.

    Anyway, these are my two cents.
    In the Spanish Caribbean you will use "tu" more than you can remember. "Usted" is used in formal settings, to someone of a higher social rank than you, and to elders. The exception is if the other person insist that you use "tu" instead, on which continuing with "usted" becomes an insult. Some people will scold you in a joking way that is suppose to be serious. To not use "tu" in the DR means that a person isn't native to the Spanish Caribbean or Spanish in general was learn later in life.

    In the Caribbean the Spanish has more in common to certain areas of Andalusia and the Canary Islands, both in southern Spain. Natives from there even drop the "S" at the end of some words and in the Canary Islands natives will use "guagua" to refer to a bus, just like it's done in the Spanish Caribbean (but not done elsewhere in Latin America, except some Chileans but they use it to mean a baby). The people in those parts of Spain don't even pronounce the "Z" as natives from Madrid do, which is often thought as the correct Spanish despite that the RAE says that all Spanish dialects are correct. The Spanish spoken in many parts of Andalusia and in the Canary Islands is often joke about by people from Madrid, Barcelona, etc; despite that several studies have shown that the language spoken there is more developed than in Madrid. Paradoxes of life. LOL

    I have caught even people that lived in the DR doing as faux pas in other countries. Take "chin", which is a Taino word that is used in the DR and less so in Cuba, PR, and Venezuela. Outside of those countries the people don't even know what it means (meaning: a little bit). I saw Mustafa Abu Naba saying "chin" in Panama. SMH

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  12. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by NALs View Post
    In the Spanish Caribbean you will use "tu" more than you can remember. "Usted" is used in formal settings, to someone of a higher social rank than you, and to elders. The exception is if the other person insist that you use "tu" instead, on which continuing with "usted" becomes an insult. Some people will scold you in a joking way that is suppose to be serious. To not use "tu" in the DR means that a person isn't native to the Spanish Caribbean or Spanish in general was learn later in life.......
    I agree with this piece. As I mentioned in several posts Tú is predominant in the Caribbean outside of certain scenarios.


    Quote Originally Posted by trynity99 View Post
    Naci y vivi en sudamerica hasta my early 20's.

    This my first contribution to DR1, hope

    Como estas? la letra "s" implica el tu, esto lo usamos en conversaciones con amigos, familia, conversaciones diarias, etc.
    Como esta? implica usted, mas formal.
    Como esta usted? recontra formal, por ejemplo, con el presidente de tu compañia, si quieres causar una muy buena impresion.

    Marianopolita como estas? - confianza, que te conozco o te considero un igual.
    Marianopolita como esta? - recien te conozco y/o eres bastante mayor que , o eres mu jefe(a), etc
    Marianopolita como esta usted? es un poco mas formal.

    Hoy en dia el 90% de las conversaciones de una persona comun es mas desentendida, informal.

    Mi idioma de nacimiento es el español y yo uso como estas?, casi nunca "Tu", no recuerdo la vez que use"tu"
    Como esta? o como esta usted? como señal de respeto, ejm, personas mayores.


    Como estan? la letra "n" iimplica ellos(usetedes), lo usamos si le preguntas a 2 o mas personas.

    Marianopolita y AE como estan?

    T
    Resumen:
    Si usas "tu" lo mas probable es que el español es tu segunda lengua y la aprendiste de adulto.
    Usted se usa en situaciones en la que quieres dar a entender que respetas a la persona o la posicion de la persona.

    Anyway, these are my two cents.

    In general, I agree with your post but there is room for discussion on differences in the Spanish-speaking world but that is something I would prefer to do face to face rather than on a message board.


    Gracias.


    Quote Originally Posted by AlterEgo View Post
    As you know, we live in the campo. The people there all call me Dona or Señora and use Ud. I’m a very informal person, and I struggle to remind myself to use Ud. I spend a lot of time with extended family, and it’s tu all the way, them and me.

    Yes, I do feel the difference.


    Yes, this sounds typical. If you are not used to Usted don’t worry about it. I think people will have a different expectation. They will be happy that you try to communicate (I hope).


    Quote Originally Posted by Chirimoya View Post
    I dislike usted as it goes against my nature to consider anyone an inferior or a superior. I'm almost always taken aback when someone of any age/status addresses me as usted.

    I recognise the value of using usted to show respect but only up to a point. I try to show respect by listening to the person, letting them finish a sentence, and not talking over them, which a lot of people who painstakingly use the conventions of usted, don/doña, señor/a and other courtesies don't always bother with.

    I agree with this and I read an article precisely about this last night. It was about Usted and those who use it are not always the best example of politeness. The reverse was true that people who use the informal clearly were more polite in their form of address and behaviour towards people.



    -MP.
    Last edited by Marianopolita; 07-19-2019 at 07:22 PM.

    Lectura del verano/ Summer reading.
    This is the book I am reading by Dany Laferriere
    ‘No hay mal que por bien no venga’
    Moderator Spanish Forum
    www.DR1.com

  13. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by trynity99 View Post
    Naci y vivi en sudamerica hasta my early 20's.

    This my first contribution to DR1, hope

    Como estas? la letra "s" implica el tu, esto lo usamos en conversaciones con amigos, familia, conversaciones diarias, etc.
    Como esta? implica usted, mas formal.
    Como esta usted? recontra formal, por ejemplo, con el presidente de tu compañia, si quieres causar una muy buena impresion......

    One other aspect I forgot to mention in my first response was without you saying where you are from I knew right away because of your usage of recontra. That usage recontra formal is so Peruvian in my observation. Not to say it is not heard in other countries (especially South America) but it is definitely Peruvian the usage of that prefix. In other regions re is more common. For example, rebueno.

    Spanish has a lot regional markers and this example is one of them. I hear it from my Peruvian friends all the time and I also read a lot of Jaime Bayly which is typical of his speech.



    https://www.fundeu.es/recomendacion/...ontra-prefijo/


    -MP.

    Lectura del verano/ Summer reading.
    This is the book I am reading by Dany Laferriere
    ‘No hay mal que por bien no venga’
    Moderator Spanish Forum
    www.DR1.com

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