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  1. #21
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    Back when I was learning Spanish (and I am not fluent, everyone understands me, but my tenses slip), I asked Mr AE to help teach me. He was reluctant and I asked why. One of the things I remember him saying (there were others, but this one stuck with me) was that he was afraid I’d use tu instead of usted. I still prompt myself to use Ud, and then I get someone telling me “use tu when you talk to me” (that was a cousin). Mr AE is what Americans call a “grammar nazi” with Spanish, but boy, can he slip into Dominican slang at the drop of a hat!

    As Marianopolita said, we foreigners often get away with this. Hopefully, when I slip up, they aren’t offended by the gringa loca.




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  2. #22
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    Usted is used to show courtesy towards older/higher status people but also to maintain distance, as pointed out by Matilda and Africaida.
    There is also an ironic usted - towards children for example, and a passive-aggressive usted, to put someone in their place if they're being too familiar.
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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlterEgo View Post
    Back when I was learning Spanish (and I am not fluent, everyone understands me, but my tenses slip), I asked Mr AE to help teach me. He was reluctant and I asked why. One of the things I remember him saying (there were others, but this one stuck with me) was that he was afraid I’d use tu instead of usted. I still prompt myself to use Ud, and then I get someone telling me “use tu when you talk to me” (that was a cousin). Mr AE is what Americans call a “grammar nazi” with Spanish, but boy, can he slip into Dominican slang at the drop of a hat!

    As Marianopolita said, we foreigners often get away with this. Hopefully, when I slip up, they aren’t offended by the gringa loca.

    That is interesting that your husband’s fear was that you mix up the informal and formal thus he was reluctant to teach you but you need practice. Yes, you will mix it up but that is all part of learning. I don’t think people are going to be so critical if you use tú instead of usted and especially if they know you are learning.

    Incorrect usage may raise some eyebrows but you get better with practice. The DR in general is tuteo country and Usted has specific usage. I mentioned in my post #3 about respect and distance which is why you want to be careful otherwise you will make observations as you interact and learn the language.

    In my opinion, a bigger issue is because in colloquial speech the S is dropped then it seems like tú and usted have the same verb forms in all tenses and they do not. Compare:


    Tú va with Usted va. Where is the difference?

    It s/b Tú vas but if you drop the S they appear to be same form. That is why in the Caribbean the usage of the pronoun Tú is so prevalent compared to other regions because it clarifies the form of address since the S is dropped. It distinguishes the informal and the formal. In Spanish, the subject pronoun is for emphasis. It is not mandatory when conjugating verbs. From a linguistic standpoint this is well-analyzed and noted. The heavy usage of tú is noted in the speech patterns in Cuba, DR and PR.



    -MP.
    Last edited by Marianopolita; 07-11-2019 at 11:28 AM.

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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    Here is a linguistic map. It gives a breakdown by country the usage of tú, usted and vos. Check out the DR and other Spanish-speaking Caribbean countries. They have similar patterns.






    Source: Altura Interactive Spanish Digital Marketing



    -MP.
    Love that map, very interesting.

    I appreciate that the fact that Guinea Ecuatorial is mentioned. I recently met someone from that part of the world, very interesting "accent" (to me, they sound a tiny bit like me as if they speak french ).
    May be, it should be another thread, but are you familiar with it MP?

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Africaida View Post
    Love that map, very interesting.

    I appreciate that the fact that Guinea Ecuatorial is mentioned. I recently met someone from that part of the world, very interesting "accent" (to me, they sound a tiny bit like me as if they speak french ).
    May be, it should be another thread, but are you familiar with it MP?

    Am I familiar with the accent from Equatorial Guinea?

    Bueno un poquito na’ma. Realmente no te puedo decir que tenga conocimiento.


    I have only heard the accent on You Tube listening to locals and the leader of the country. I hear a very distinct accent from Spain. It is definitely there. However, that is a very small sample size.


    The accent is definitely a mix so if it sounds like French I am not surprised.

    For example, I once bumped into a lady from Guadalupe in Toronto. I don’t how I started talking to her. She asked for directions in French (just like that in Toronto very unusual ) and I helped her but her accent to me was very different but then again I find French very distinct from the Caribbean so I can relate to your observation.


    I think the map is great too.


    -MP.

    Lectura del verano/ Summer reading.
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    ‘No hay mal que por bien no venga’
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  7. #26
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    Did anyone notice that the map has Costa Rica and Nicaragua reversed in location?

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  9. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2dlight View Post
    Did anyone notice that the map has Costa Rica and Nicaragua reversed in location?

    Good catch. I was so interested in the information that I did not focus on the accuracy of the arrows to ensure that they are pointing to the right country. The info though about the pronouns used in Costa Rica and Nicaragua is correct. I can vouch for that.


    I just sent the company an email requesting that they correct the map. We don’t want to upset the Ticos and Nicas.


    Thanks,

    -MP.

    Lectura del verano/ Summer reading.
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    ‘No hay mal que por bien no venga’
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  10. #28
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    As I mentioned in another thread, we've been watching the new Netflix show, Bolivar. 60 episodes. The majority of the actors are Venezuelan, Colombian, etc., very easy to understand. After watching about 10 episodes, I mentioned to Mr. AE that not one person has said "tu". Even husbands and wives use "usted". He said he noticed the same thing. We're up to around episode 48, and last night the British officer, "O'Leary", used "tu". Mr. AE actually noticed, and said it was the first time we heard "tu". I said that he got away with it because he was an Irish foreigner.




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  11. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlterEgo View Post
    As I mentioned in another thread, we've been watching the new Netflix show, Bolivar. 60 episodes. The majority of the actors are Venezuelan, Colombian, etc., very easy to understand. After watching about 10 episodes, I mentioned to Mr. AE that not one person has said "tu". Even husbands and wives use "usted". He said he noticed the same thing. We're up to around episode 48, and last night the British officer, "O'Leary", used "tu". Mr. AE actually noticed, and said it was the first time we heard "tu". I said that he got away with it because he was an Irish foreigner.

    It is known that Colombia is Usted country. Not to say that the informal is not used but it is a whole different dynamic. In Venezuela the informal is more prevalent and Usted applies in applicable scenarios. This is no surprise. The Caribbean is considered to be very relaxed in comparison to Colombia that really knocks Usted out the park. Then there is voseo usage which is a totally different form of address. For example, if you are paisa voseo is the default. Those forms foreigners do not need to learn but you will hear it.


    -MP.

    Lectura del verano/ Summer reading.
    This is the book I am reading by Dany Laferriere
    ‘No hay mal que por bien no venga’
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  12. #30
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    AE,


    A question for you. What or how do you feel when you are addressed in Spanish? Are you expecting the formal or informal? Does it have an impact? Do you feel the difference with the two forms of address?



    -MP.

    Lectura del verano/ Summer reading.
    This is the book I am reading by Dany Laferriere
    ‘No hay mal que por bien no venga’
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