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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    So when in doubt which You do you use? - La pregunta del millón.
    I use the more formal, third person form. This has less to do with speaking Spanish than my upbringing. As as child, my grandparents insisted that I address others formally, i.e., a title and surname. Familiar adults, e.g., friends of adult relatives, received a title and first name. I address everyone in the third person. First, it is easier. Second, such is how I desire to be addressed, particularly by children.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Africaida View Post
    After all, in their everyday conversation with family members, they don't really need to use a more formal way.
    This may be so for them, but such was not the manner of my upbringing in North America. Moreover, many subcultures would not tolerate such informality. Even familiar relatives took a title, e.g., Cousin Mary. Only the pets were addressed informally.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Rey de Mangu View Post
    My default is Usted. I have trained myself to use it over the years because when folks whom I don't know come at me with "tu", it sounds very ignorant. My kids are big "tu" offenders and I work hard against that. If i'm in court and the magistrate or an attorney whips out a "tu", then I switch. I gave them the opportunity and they went low. Lol
    Quote Originally Posted by Marianopolita View Post
    You use usted in all conversations? In the DR?

    -MP.
    Many of us do. I certainly do. It represents respect. I remember my very first visit to the DR, wherein I passed a very poor man with his children in tow near the beach. I had a question for him, and addressed him in the third person form. His kids looked at me in shock, and you could see that they were not used to having their father addressed as such. You could see the pride in one of them as they watched the foreigner demonstrate respect to their father. It was a good interaction.

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