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  1. #1
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    Default Has anyone successfully rejuvinated inverter batteries?

    With inverter batteries around 7k pesos each and my set up has eight batteries, I think it's worth a try.

    When they were new, they could last up to twelve hours on inverter power. Now, I'm lucky if I get twenty minutes.

    So do I shell out 56k pesos for new ones, or try and rejuvinate them with some basic chemicals?

    Step 1; drain battery electrolyte.
    Step 2; flush with solution of distilled water and baking soda.
    Step 3; repeat flush with baking soda solution, then drain completely.
    Step 4; Fill cells with solution of distilled water and epsom salts.
    Step 5; constant current charge for at least 48 hrs

    Here's the You Tube tutorial


  2. #2
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    Beeza buy new ones not worth the effort to redneck it...

  3. #3
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    Default

    Ok, here's the non-redneck version!


  4. #4
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    The main failure mode of batteries is because of sulphation on the plates. It builds up over time because of the charge and discharge cycles and is worse in areas where ambient temperatures are high, like in the DR.

    EDTA, a chemical normally used to preserve food items, was touted as a way to remove the sulphation. It never worked for me.

    Another failure mode is lead dropping to the bottom of the battery and shorting out a cell, rendering the battery useless.

    Neither of those failure modes will be rejuvenated by replacing the acid. I am afraid you will be wasting your time with any and all rejuvenation methods and then be buying 8 new batteries. I settled on Trojan Red T105 batteries as the most cost effective choice.

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  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by windeguy View Post
    The main failure mode of batteries is because of sulphation on the plates. It builds up over time because of the charge and discharge cycles and is worse in areas where ambient temperatures are high, like in the DR.

    EDTA, a chemical normally used to preserve food items, was touted as a way to remove the sulphation. It never worked for me.

    Another failure mode is lead dropping to the bottom of the battery and shorting out a cell, rendering the battery useless.

    Neither of those failure modes will be rejuvenated by replacing the acid. I am afraid you will be wasting your time with any and all rejuvenation methods and then be buying 8 new batteries. I settled on Trojan Red T105 batteries as the most cost effective choice.
    I sold GNB batteries for over 10 years and asked the company about this subject. Their reply you can try but it's a waist of time. Once the lead cinter is disolved no way it will grow back.

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  8. #6
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    Unless you can rejuvenate the lead plates, you won't rejuvenate the batteries.

    I agree with Windy: net net, red Trojan's T105's are the most cost effective batteries on the market today. Why? More lead...

    Make sure you have an equalization cycle on your charger to de-sulfate the plates.
    Cabin Attendant,
    Augusto Pinochet Helicopter Tours

  9. #7
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    Winde knows his batteries.
    If you decide to do battery cpr please be sure and come back and tell us how it went.
    Who know you could be the first, the Chosen one, so to speak to successfully bring batteries back from the dead.

    Since we ate talking batteries I always wondered about guys saying never set batteries on concrete, it drains them.
    How would a battery inside a plastic case know it was setting on concrete.
    Any science to this?

  10. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoomzx11 View Post
    Winde knows his batteries.
    If you decide to do battery cpr please be sure and come back and tell us how it went.
    Who know you could be the first, the Chosen one, so to speak to successfully bring batteries back from the dead.

    Since we ate talking batteries I always wondered about guys saying never set batteries on concrete, it drains them.
    How would a battery inside a plastic case know it was setting on concrete.
    Any science to this?
    The plastic used today in non-conductive, so there could be no reason a battery will discharge sitting on concrete or any other surfcace.

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  12. #9
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    Setting the batteries on the concrete floor is related to heat exchange not discharge. Concrete holds heat for a long time and conversely concrete can retain the cold equally well. Batteries do not like being too cold and they don't like being too hot either. By providing an inch or two of airspace between the batteries and the floor the air can circulate so a hot/cool floor doesn't have an impact on the batteries. Batteries can get warm during charging and if sitting on the floor some of that heat is conducted to the concrete which in turn keeps the bottom of the battery warmer than it needs to be.

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  14. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by windeguy View Post
    The main failure mode of batteries is because of sulphation on the plates. It builds up over time because of the charge and discharge cycles and is worse in areas where ambient temperatures are high, like in the DR.



    Neither of those failure modes will be rejuvenated by replacing the acid. I am afraid you will be wasting your time with any and all rejuvenation methods and then be buying 8 new batteries. I settled on Trojan Red T105 batteries as the most cost effective choice.
    I have been considering a product that claims to prevent sulphation on the plates, Megapulse VEESystem. It does not claim to rejuvenate dead batteries though, but if you have e.g. 50% capacity left, it can help according to some success stories from its customers (looks credible with big names like Volvo Trucks http://d3k0i7n26y0ont.cloudfront.net...%20Studies.pdf)

    Megapulse has recently been introduced in DR, https://www.ideomaticsrl.com/veesystem

    It costs about 7k dop, same as a new battery.

    I might give it a try, the specific gravity of my batteries indicate about half capacity, and it is easy to measure any improvement. And it seems beyond doubt that it is benificial when using new batteries to prevent sulphation.

    Any with experience using the product. It has been on the market for many years, one could ask if it works well with new batteries, why do you not see it in more stores....

    Anyway, more information/sales pitch here http://www.necon.co.za/index.php

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