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  1. #1
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    Default Eggs by the dozen

    For no particular reason I always buy brown eggs. Invariably there is one egg out of the dozen that is a lot lighter in color. or maybe spotted or something. I always wonder if there is a reason for that or just an anomaly. Anyone have any insight?
    Derfish

  2. #2
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    White chickens with white ear lobes = white eggs dark feathered with red ear lobes brown eggs some speckled all same brown eggs tend be more $$ due to size usuallly bigger egg

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by lifeisgreat View Post
    White chickens with white ear lobes = white eggs dark feathered with red ear lobes brown eggs some speckled all same brown eggs tend be more $$ due to size usuallly bigger egg
    But my question in my little mind is why one different in every dozen?

  4. #4
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    In South America I’ve eaten blue chicken eggs...

  5. #5
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    Derf
    they don't box the eggs as they drop out of the hen

    Maybe they only had 11 brown ones.....

    Try buying 6 at a time and see if you get a 1/2 & 1/2 ..... as the sixth

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  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Derfish View Post
    But my question in my little mind is why one different in every dozen?
    Probably the same reason that there always seems to be one almost rotting onion in the net bag.
    They're trying to pass it off.

  8. #7
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    Besides breed and genetics, diet and stress level in the hen can affect egg pigment. As hens age, the pigment in their eggs tends to lighten as well.

    Blue eggs come from a breed called Araucanas, but also from “Easter Egger” chickens. That variety can produce a wide range of pigments, from dark brown, blue, green, yellow, and even light pink.

    Source 1: I was a farm kid

    Source 2: https://www.farmersalmanac.com/what-...chickens-11097

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  10. #8
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    In modern processing & packaging facilities produce and uniform products such as eggs are washed and optically scanned for defects or blemishes. Products that don't pass muster are kicked off the conveyor belt and sidelined. So back home all your eggs are brown and pretty much the same size.

    Here in the DR I'm guessing that level of automation is a rarity as eggs do not regularly get washed and I am confident are placed in the containers by a horde of manual packaging employees. Thus products in a particular package are subject to some minor variations as employees pack away to keep their production numbers up.

    As mentioned, hens can lay eggs with an off colour shell or yolk for a variety of reasons but the egg itself should be fine to consume provided it is relatively fresh. I am sure a purple egg would be passed over, however, a lighter shade of brown or a speckled shell probably would still make it to market. Expecting uniform conformity in produce products seems to be a 1st world obsession among consumers.

    In short, minor variations in eggshell colour is not a big deal here for most consumers. You have the ability to check colour consistency when you select which package of eggs you purchase.

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    One thing is for sure, the eggs you see in colmados ( generally in a 24 " box " ) are washed. Garanteed.
    An unwashed egg looks like something that was dragged through a hen's backside.

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  13. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by malko View Post
    One thing is for sure, the eggs you see in colmados ( generally in a 24 " box " ) are washed. Garanteed.
    I don't think that is correct because a washed egg needs to be refrigerated

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