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Thread: FOUNDATION

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob saunders View Post
    Absolutely. One of our teachers from last year got hired into the Public system. She is teaching grade two and she says she has not one student that can read even at grade one level. Many of our children can read halfway through preprimario. Many of those that can't read need extensive one on one until they breakthrough. Perhaps Potus can collaborate with you.
    Thanks, Bob. Our plan is to work in 7 mountain schools with children in grades 1 - 3 to tutor reading. We have a great program for doing so. Will work with children based on reading level, not grade and in groups of 1 - 3 children, twice a week. We also require one teacher in the school to work with us. Doing so, we are sharing our teaching methods with hope that the teacher will then use similar methodology and share with his/her colleagues.

    We realize that we cannot bring these children up to level in 5 short months, but continuing next year, perhaps we can make a difference.

    Lindsey

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by LindseyKaufman View Post
    Thanks, Bob. Our plan is to work in 7 mountain schools with children in grades 1 - 3 to tutor reading. We have a great program for doing so. Will work with children based on reading level, not grade and in groups of 1 - 3 children, twice a week. We also require one teacher in the school to work with us. Doing so, we are sharing our teaching methods with hope that the teacher will then use similar methodology and share with his/her colleagues.

    We realize that we cannot bring these children up to level in 5 short months, but continuing next year, perhaps we can make a difference.

    Lindsey
    Do you use the " Maria y Manuel " text or something similar?

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob saunders View Post
    Do you use the " Maria y Manuel " text or something similar?
    No. We are using the Scholastic program Lecturas Cortas.

    https://shop.scholastic.com/teachers...turas%20Cortas

  4. #14
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    I am a fan of having one owns personal charity, donating time, money and items to others. Works quite well and no need for paperwork.

  5. #15
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    Default DR1 News.

    Pisa test says Dominicans are the worst students in Latin America
    Public and private school students in the Dominican Republic ranked last of nine Latin American countries participating in the 2018 Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) ranking. The international school ranking is based on tests taken by 15-year olds in 79 countries and regions and tests reading, math and science capacities.

    Despite a humongous government investment in education since the previous test in 2015, the overall capacities of Dominican students have not progressed on the international school ranking. The Medina administration has invested billions in new schools, incorporated new technology for the use of the students, provided school breakfasts and lunches and more school hours. Wages were significantly improved. Public school teachers today in many cases are better paid than private school teachers.

    Yet PISA 2018 tells that the performance of Dominican students is the worst among 80 countries evaluated in mathematics and science and the second to last in comprehensive reading skills. According to the results of the 2018 Pisa test run, Dominican private and public school students continue to be the lowest achievers among the nine nations tested in Latin America. 79% of students showed a low level of competence in reading, math and science. The Dominican Republic scored 342 in reading, 336 in science and 325 in mathematics.

    The director of the OECD, Gabriela Ramos, said when presenting the results in Guadalajara, Mexico that in the nine Latin American countries included in the study, around half of the students had low levels of performance. But, in the Dominican Republic practically all of the students were low achievers, including low scores in basic reading skills.

    600,000 students aged 15 years from around the world took the two-hour online tests.

    The Dominican Republic ranked 78th of 79 countries assessed in the OECD 2018 global test of students’ reading, mathematics and science skills. Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Panama, Peru and Uruguay participated in the test this year. The test is a measure of how local pupils compare by international standards. The tests are an influential measure of education standards, offering a different perspective from national exams.

    In mathematics skills, Dominican students did especially poor. The Pisa test shows the Dominican Republic continues to rank last in Latin America in mathematics. The DR scored an average of 325 points, only below the Philippines on a global scale. Chile was the Latin American country with the best reading results, ranking 43rd globally, followed by Uruguay and Costa Rica.

    The Medina administration has invested billions in the construction of new public schools, but the recent standardized test shows the investment has not yet paid off.

    Education Minister Antonio Peña Mirabal said the test scores show that the advances in education matters are to be achieved in the medium and long term. The spokesperson for Educa (Acción Empresarial por la Educación), the private pro-quality education entity, said the test scores reveal that the Dominican Republic needs to change its 20th century education model for one adapted to the 21st century. Educa director Darwin Caraballo said on an interview with Diana Lora and Patricia Solano for La Cuestion radio talk show that a pact for quality education needs to be signed.

    In an editorial on 4 December 2019, executive editor of Diario Libre, Adriano Miguel Tejada concludes: “It is evident that what is happening today is the fault of politicians, the ministers of education, the deaf Dominican Association of Teachers, permissive parents and the new perspective students have on what will help them most to get on with their future, among other causes. The tragedy unveiled by PISA is everyone's fault.”

    https://www.oecd.org/pisa/
    https://listindiario.com/la-republic...ueba-pisa-2018
    https://elnacional.com.do/rd-ocupa-o...-informe-pisa/
    https://hoy.com.do/esto-dice-el-mine...-pruebas-pisa/
    https://elnacional.com.do/rd-ocupa-o...-informe-pisa/
    https://domiplay.net/podcast/la-cues...2019-12-03-Tue
    https://www.diariolibre.com/opinion/...isa-EE15661027
    https://www.diariolibre.com/actualid...den-MH15658172
    https://eldia.com.do/quien-reprobo/

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob saunders View Post
    Potus is not American, and there are numerous Dominican foundation for education, Art....etc.
    Thank you......the haters are always quick to come out and insult.......

    Nevertheless, we have very specific goals in the medical and educational field.

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  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by LindseyKaufman View Post
    No. We are using the Scholastic program Lecturas Cortas.

    https://shop.scholastic.com/teachers...turas%20Cortas
    2556A3BA-3485-419B-AB38-F166D808E185.jpg .....

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  10. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by TropicalPaul View Post
    Let me try to answer your questions. First, one of the biggest areas of need is to help people set up their own businesses. Salaries are generally so low that if you're in a basic job, you're just able to survive. So many people want to set up their own businesses and IMO have good ideas but lack the commercial ability to work out feasibility, understand costings and know how to set up a business legally. But like the adage "teach a man to fish and you'll feed him for life", it would be a good thing to do.

    It is reasonably pointless trying to raise money in Dom Rep for good causes, IMO. Dominican culture isn't particularly charitable, at least compared with developed countries, and even higher earners seem to have little spare cash. So I think your foundation would only work if bringing in funds to support itself from the outside.

    Finally, setting up any company (yours would be "sin fines de lucro" which means non-profit) is complicated and there are a lot of things which if you don't get right from the start will trip you up later down the line. You will need a good lawyer and you will need to hire accountants who have dealt with other organisations like the one you are setting up, and know all the tax provisions. ITBIS is very very complicated, and for Sin fines organisations is even more complex. Don't think you can just parachute someone in here from another country, it honestly won't work.

    Thanks for the useful information here.

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  12. #19
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    There are a multitude of variances that create a low standard of Education.
    Back in the late 40's I attended for a while a one room school with 14 students and 10 grades. The Teacher had Grade 11 ; and the Post War economy was worse than now in the RD.
    But, in the RD it is ''Education that fosters Education''. And that means beginning in the home , family planning. good nutrition,
    In my opinion Children go to school for three reasons 1. Those who want to be with their friends away from home;2 those who attend school because it is the law ;3 and those who really want to excel and become a professional or just better themselves.
    There is not a lot of encouragement when the home-life is in desperate and in poverty.
    There are the baseball and basketball champions that everyone knows about.
    Perhaps there should be a proliferation of successful stories of Scholars who have done really well and came from the barrios and el'campo.
    Let them be the ''Poster People'' for a change.
    I know of one case where a Dominican Boy went from a Grade 8 in Luperon to the same level in Canada... he did really well and is now about to graduate with honors. It wasn't the system as much as the encouragement from family and others.
    SO, how do we get the Dominican Kids up on the Global Scale ...... answer that and the problem is solved.
    Russell

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  14. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by potus View Post
    Thank you......the haters are always quick to come out and insult.......

    Nevertheless, we have very specific goals in the medical and educational field.
    Partners healthcare has got both sides of the island all sewn up. Ain’t nobody muscling in on their charitable work. They’re ruthless.

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