Page 1 of 28 12311 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 274
  1. #1
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    650
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default From today's DR1 news: PISA ranking

    From the DR1 news:

    "Pisa test says Dominicans are the worst students in Latin America
    Despite a humongous government investment in education since the previous test in 2015, the overall capacities of Dominican students have not progressed on the international school ranking. The Medina administration has invested billions in new schools, incorporated new technology for the use of the students, provided school breakfasts and lunches and more school hours. Wages were significantly improved."

    I'm from one of the European countries with the best PISA results, and there, as in other European countries as well (as far as I'm aware of), the school day for smaller kids (<14yo), is never longer than 3-4 hours. That is for the reason, that, as far as I understand, there is a limit of how much can a kid of that age actually take in during one day, efficiently.

    My wife's niece is in a public school, and they have the extended day of 8 hours. I have no idea what they do those full 8 hours, but I just mentioned her the other day that I find this odd. Anyone with more expertise on this please feel free to chime in, but if the top PISA performes have that much shorter day, I find it odd that here the government finds it a good idea to extend the school day. Of course, if they do other activies than studying, that's another thing, then it might be a good thing.

    Also, the news reports that a lot of money was put to new schools, and a while ago, it was reported that public school teachers here failed horribly in the tests. So my question is, how does it help to have more brick walls put together, if there are no qualified teachers available to teach anyone?

    Apparently it doesn't, because the PISA results are horrible despite of these "efforts" by the government... Based on another discussion on this forum recently, all the "efforts" would just be a "pantalla" where the government appears to be doing good for the education but in fact is not doing anything... Rant over...

  2. #2
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    30,490
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Where is PICHARDO when you need a little PLD spin on this?

  3. #3
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    26,892
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by josh2203 View Post
    From the DR1 news:

    "Pisa test says Dominicans are the worst students in Latin America
    Despite a humongous government investment in education since the previous test in 2015, the overall capacities of Dominican students have not progressed on the international school ranking. The Medina administration has invested billions in new schools, incorporated new technology for the use of the students, provided school breakfasts and lunches and more school hours. Wages were significantly improved."

    I'm from one of the European countries with the best PISA results, and there, as in other European countries as well (as far as I'm aware of), the school day for smaller kids (<14yo), is never longer than 3-4 hours. That is for the reason, that, as far as I understand, there is a limit of how much can a kid of that age actually take in during one day, efficiently.

    My wife's niece is in a public school, and they have the extended day of 8 hours. I have no idea what they do those full 8 hours, but I just mentioned her the other day that I find this odd. Anyone with more expertise on this please feel free to chime in, but if the top PISA performes have that much shorter day, I find it odd that here the government finds it a good idea to extend the school day. Of course, if they do other activies than studying, that's another thing, then it might be a good thing.

    Also, the news reports that a lot of money was put to new schools, and a while ago, it was reported that public school teachers here failed horribly in the tests. So my question is, how does it help to have more brick walls put together, if there are no qualified teachers available to teach anyone?

    Apparently it doesn't, because the PISA results are horrible despite of these "efforts" by the government... Based on another discussion on this forum recently, all the "efforts" would just be a "pantalla" where the government appears to be doing good for the education but in fact is not doing anything... Rant over...
    First of all almost every teacher in the Dominican Republic is a product of the same inferior school system. The majority of them are teachers because the pay is better than most other professions in the DR and there is a pension system that is pretty good by country standards. Few have actually teaching ability and classroom discipline. By the time they get a class under control the class is half over. My wife can freeze a class with just an evil eye. Most teachers have completed their studies at the local university for teachers, very poor practicum...etc . Those that have their teaching degrees from UASD or PUCMM are much better prepared. The curriculum is fine, the textbooks too advanced for age level and ability of Dominican students. The list of problems is long and exhaustive

  4. Likes JDJones, Garyexpat, Auryn, Squat, ramesses liked this post
  5. #4
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    203
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The average mathematical ability of all teachers is a 4th grade. Language skills are very low when compared the Latin American region.

    The country has gone from bad to worse. The bad students of today will be the mediocre teachers of tomorrow.

    Check Ricardo Nieves video for reality:


  6. #5
    Gold
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    2,032
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bob saunders View Post
    First of all almost every teacher in the Dominican Republic is a product of the same inferior school system. The majority of them are teachers because the pay is better than most other professions in the DR and there is a pension system that is pretty good by country standards. Few have actually teaching ability and classroom discipline. By the time they get a class under control the class is half over. My wife can freeze a class with just an evil eye. Most teachers have completed their studies at the local university for teachers, very poor practicum...etc . Those that have their teaching degrees from UASD or PUCMM are much better prepared. The curriculum is fine, the textbooks too advanced for age level and ability of Dominican students. The list of problems is long and exhaustive
    My neighbors are both teachers. English teachers. Really, really nice folks.

    Neither one can speak English, at least not to the point where I can understand what they are trying to say.

    They both think they are excellent teachers.'

    The whole attempt at improving education starts with more schools and improving teachers.

    They've only been trying to do it for a few years so far so I'm not surprised there are no tangible improvements yet.

  7. Likes bob saunders, Squat liked this post
  8. #6
    Regular
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    203
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    In another video Ricardo Nieves recommends to send 10,000 graduates/teachers to Spain or Mexico to get educated, prepared and
    then assign them to teach schools to help fix the big problem of education.
    Last edited by bonao99; 12-04-2019 at 01:55 PM.

  9. #7
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    26,892
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bonao99 View Post
    The average mathematical ability of all teachers is a 4th grade. Language skills are very low when compared the Latin American region.

    The country has gone from bad to worse. The bad students of today will be the mediocre teachers of tomorrow.

    Check Ricardo Nieves video for reality:

    My wife gives prospective teachers looking for employment a test that she gives all grade five students when assessing them. Almost all fail. I was always horrible at math but my math skills are in the stratosphere in comparison to most Dominican teachers.

  10. #8
    Silver
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    2,381
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bob saunders View Post
    I was always horrible at math but my math skills are in the stratosphere in comparison to most Dominican teachers.
    I don't think that's unique to the DR. In my country, the UK, hardly anyone who serves you, who is under about 40, has any idea of how much change to give you without resorting to electronic assistance.

  11. #9
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    39,611
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drstock View Post
    I don't think that's unique to the DR. In my country, the UK, hardly anyone who serves you, who is under about 40, has any idea of how much change to give you without resorting to electronic assistance.
    It's not much different in the states where many teachers can't pass simple tests.
    Cabin Attendant,
    Augusto Pinochet Helicopter Tours

  12. Likes DavidZ liked this post
  13. #10
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    881
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default NGO regrets the country’s dismal education


Page 1 of 28 12311 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •