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Thread: LNG in the DR

  1. #1
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    Default LNG in the DR

    About two years ago I attended an all day seminar at a LNG facility in Savannah Ga. I was totally impressed how the transport of compressed gas can change the standard of living in those countries that install the pipeline for distribution.

    With all that was going on with "Lindsay" a couple of weeks ago there was major news in the DR1 that went overlooked. A pipeline in the DR for LNG is a game changer for the country. This is big news and will have major implications on all sectors of life.

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  3. #2
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    Let me think for a minute. Dominicans see power lines and tap into them for free electricity,
    water line out in the open, tap into that, its free.
    Now they gonna put a gas pipeline trough towns. Cant be a good outcome.
    Remember about a year or so ago when the natives in mexico I think, tapped into a gasoline pipline. Not good

  4. #3
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    I see. Is that what "one minute " of thinking gets you? . Got it and thanks for your opinion.

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  6. #4
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    A big commercial propane explosion in Santo Domingo not that long ago.

    I can see it now, a loaded tanker in port waiting to offload it's cargo to a storage and pumping facility built on the back of kickbacks and typical construction practices - bye bye port. Or how about some bozo thinking if he drills a tiny hole in the pipeline he can get free fuel for the rest of his life - well he can but the rest of his life will be very short and anyone else in the vicinity of the pipeline will be joining him presently. Oh wait better yet, transport trucks moving this stuff to distributors on the awesome highways of this country surrounded by careful and considerate drivers. Yeah, I can see it too...


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  8. #5
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    I definitely want to live close to one of these places...


  9. #6
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    Those of us that live here do understand what a game changer having gas pipelines run could be. An island prone to earthquakes, theft of services, lack of proper maintenance and haphazard design practices, government run corrupt utilities, etc.

    Where exactly are these pipelines going? Only near Santo Domingo, I hope?

    At least natural gas rises and is a bit safer than propane on that account.

  10. #7
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    See DR1 Dec 18 News. A little research on the subject will help you get over the fear of something new in your country. You might like the idea. BTW it's happening.

  11. #8
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    Oh good, it's in the east. No worries for me. Have at it. Any takers on a poll as to when the first explosion will happen?


    New natural gas investments for US$300 million in five years



    President Danilo Medina and Andres Gluski, CEO of AES Corporation, presided over the inauguration of the 50 km Eastern Gas Pipeline (Gasoducto del Este) and the ground-breaking for the construction of a 120,000 CM storage tank to facilitate additional gas throughout the eastern region. The new liquefied natural gas storage tank to be added to the Punta Caucedo, Boca Chica terminal expands the AES natural gas storage capacity in the Dominican Republic by 80%.

    The Eastern Pipeline is under construction for the supply of natural gas to 750 megawatts of generation units located in eastern provinces. The power plants previously operated using fuel oil and are expected to be fully converted to natural gas in the first half of 2020.

    A new corporation, Enadom will distribute gas to the eastern region of the Dominican Republic through the pipeline. Enadom's first president is José Miguel Gonzalez Cuadra. Edwin de los Santos is the corporation's first CEO. De los Santos is also CEO of AES Dominicana. Enadom was formed through the 50%-50% alliance between AES Dominicana and Energas (InterEnergy Group Ltd, Energía de las Americas, S.A. and Inalla Holdings).




    "We are on the verge of breaking our dependence on oil," said Gonzalez Cuadra. He spoke of the diverse energy matrix of the Dominican Republic's, where its 3,702.8 megawatts of installed capacity now comes from 11 different sources of generation. Of these, 22% are renewable sources.

    The first client of the Eastern Gas Pipeline was the Barrick Pueblo Viejo mining company with the signing of an agreement in May 2018. AES Andres supplies the mining firm with natural gas.

    Andres Gluski, during his remarks, said that by 2023 natural gas generation should replace fuel oil, with the country reaching a fundamental and historic milestone in the modernization of the Dominican energy matrix by using an abundant fuel that guarantees more stable and more competitive prices than those derived from oil.

    Also present at the table of honor for the event were Edwin de los Santos, CEO of AES Dominicana and Enadom, InterEnergy's Rolando Gonzalez Bunster, Osvaldo Oller Villalon (Domicen), Juan Ignacio Rubiolo, president of AES Mexico, Central America & the Caribbean, and US Ambassador Robin S. Bernstein, Ruben Jiménez Bichara, executive vice president of the Dominican Public Electricity Corporation (CDEEE), and Feliz García and Manuel Estrella, partners of AES Dominicana, among others.




    The 50 km pipeline covers the municipalities of Boca Chica, Guayacanes, Quisqueya in San Pedro de Macoris. It is a US$100 million investment. Construction was by the Consorcio Conducto-Estrella, a joint venture between Conducto of Peru and the Dominican engineering firm, Grupo Estrella.

    https://www.elcaribe.com.do/2019/12/...ucto-del-este/
    https://twitter.com/i/web/status/1206703902223196166

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    I dont understand why some of you are here. Everything from you is negative. This place is not that bad. Go back home to your countries already but you complained there too. To the OP, i think it would be a grand success.

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  14. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by alexw View Post
    I dont understand why some of you are here. Everything from you is negative. This place is not that bad. Go back home to your countries already but you complained there too. To the OP, i think it would be a grand success.
    We are here because we like to be, despite the limitations in the systems. And there are great limitations because the government is in charge of the water and power distribution. Now a gas system, what could happen?

    No place is perfect. One should not tell other people what to do, by the way. They will do what they wish to do.

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