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  1. #11
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    Many islands in the Carribean have similar food. The creole kitchen is even be found in Suriname. I have a good friend from Suriname and he recognised Dominican food from his childhood.

  2. #12
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    Yes and those similarities are also tied to the history of the people who were brought to the islands in the Caribbean and countries like Suriname. Similar food but not always the same taste. Different spices and food preparation account for the differences but in general you will find a lot of similarities.



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  3. #13
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    ¿Mi gente de DR1 cómo amanecen? Espero que estén bien. Es otro amanecer, otro día y estamos vivos. Hay que ser agradecidos.

    Bueno sigo encontrando blogs y enlances sobre el español hablado en diferentes países. Hoy le toca a Colombia. ¿Qué les parece un poco de sabor colombiano?





    I stumbled across this link a few days ago and thought it is perfect for this thread. Vocabulary in Spanish varies so much and regionalisms definitely can identify where a speaker is from or where a person may have lived for a while. The vocabulary and expressions a person uses in addition to a person’s accent give you clues. You may say to yourself ¿De dónde es xxx persona? Sometimes one word or phrase is a give away.

    From this list, I knew quite a few of the expressions and interesting enough the first word I learned recently when listening to a radio show. The person was asked ¿qué significa Amañado? Many of the expressions you can understand just by reading the example.


    https://www.colombia.co/cultura-de-c...n-en-colombia/


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  4. #14
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    Here is a brief article on Spanish in the Dominican Republic......pero me gustó.


    Article in English

    https://www.justlanded.com/english/D...nican-Republic



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  6. #15
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    Here is a podcast about the Dominican Republic. It is about 40 minutes. The conversation is about the food, language, culture, economy etc. The purpose is to let students hear different accents and ways of speaking in the Spanish-speaking world. The interviewer is from Spain and the person being interviewed is Dominican from Santo Domingo.


    I think the interview was very informative and he gave a lot of examples of Dominican Spanish and one aspect that is key that he mentioned was rural speech in the DR. Great podcast! I will listen to interviews of speakers from other countries bit by bit.

    https://www.lengalia.com/en/learn-sp...-republic.html


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  7. #16
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    These podcasts are just wonderful. It is an opportunity to hear different accents in Latin America and there are many. You may have exposure to some but if you don’t for whatever reason these podcasts will introduce you to how Spanish is spoken in Latin America.

    I listened to two this morning:

    1) Cuba- the podcast is 30 minutes. The interviewee is from Santiago de Cuba which is a large city comparable to Havana. I was surprised how non typical she sounds accent wise. She uses local vocabulary and gives examples of classic Caribbean speech patterns used in Cuba but she did not sound typically Cuban in my opinion.

    2) Panama- awesome podcast. It is 22 minutes. The interviewee is an older gentlemen and I think he sounds like the typical accent you will hear in Panama (at least la ciudad de Panamá) No question about it. He is Panamanian. He talks about the strong influence of English in Panamanian speech but it is not necessarily Spanglish because many of the words are hispanicized. There is significant influence the from English-speaking Caribbean population. This aspect is unique to Panama for the most part. Listening to this podcast made me feel like I am in Panama.

    My general observation so far after listening to three podcasts- DR, Cuba, Panama all have the same characteristics of Caribbean Spanish (not the accent) the s is dropped, the d is suppressed, in parts of DR and Cuba R to L change and note that change does not happen in Panamanian Spanish.



    I will continue my journey around the Caribbean Spanish-speaking countries before I listen to others.

    The three I will listen to next are:

    Puerto Rico
    Colombia
    Venezuela


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    Last edited by Marianopolita; 02-02-2020 at 10:45 AM.
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  8. #17
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    I listened to the Podcast interview for Puerto Rico, Colombia and Venezuela as mentioned above and Costa Rica. They are all good. The accents of the speakers for PR, Colombia and Venezuela are all typical or one of the many you will hear from those countries. I don’t have enough exposure to the Costa Rican accent to comment except that the interviewee was very clear and sounds as neutral as you can get in Spanish.

    All gave good insight about the culture, food, typical characteristics of their people and most of all language. I enjoyed the commentary on pronoun usage in all the podcasts. In fact it is one of the questions as well as what are the most common diminutive forms used. Once again I recommend these podcasts especially if you want to hear the variety of accents in Spanish.

    Up next: Nicaragua, Honduras and El Salvador.


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  9. #18
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    ¡Mejor tarde que nunca! Here's my article about Cuban and Dominican foods and what we call them.

    In English: https://www.dominicancooking.com/257...n-cooking.html

    In Spanish:https://www.cocinadominicana.com/256...ominicana.html

    The food photos are by Aunt Clara. The Havana street vendor photos were taken by my son: https://www.instagram.com/pix_lg/

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  11. #19
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    Más vale tarde que nunca- ley principal de la vida. Así que no te preocupes.


    Good articles and good comparisons. I read the Spanish one first because I would be lost in English when it comes to naming foods. I know the original names and tend describe it when people ask what it is called in English.


    I also say one can identify with or see a similarity between the two islands although the preparation is different.

    Arroz moro para los cubanos es lo máximo. De hecho, arroz moro con pollo asado.


    One dish I am surprised you did not include is el ajiaco cubano. When talking about Cuban food it is must. Also el lechón asado. A typical Cuban dish and you have to wait hours for it.


    As well, the list of names of food DR vs Cuba is good to know. It reaffirms what I was always say you have to know the differences for even something simple.


    Bueno, a comer.


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  13. #20
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    Here is a simple comparison:

    yautía vs malanga. I know both words. In a conversation with a Panamanian friend of mine I used malanga when talking about cooking certain foods. She had no clue what I was talking about. I think yautía is more generic.



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