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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob saunders View Post
    So you checked one school and that was it?
    Yes. Because SIS is considered THE BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL IN DR.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by irsav View Post
    Yes. Because SIS is considered THE BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL IN DR.
    Hardly. There are several in SD that come to mind, beginning with Carol Morgan.

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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by irsav View Post
    Yes. Because SIS is considered THE BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL IN DR.
    Says who:
    St George is also better, as is Santiago Christian school,.....etc. If the OP doesn't mind the religious part of the schooling, there are a number of bilingual Christian schools that are pretty good in both Santo Domingo (New Horizons) and in Santiago. I have a friend whose daughter teaches in the Dominican-American school in the capital and it is pretty good as well.

  4. #14
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    A private school in Punta Cana offers a US home schooling programme.

    https://maximopotencial.edu.do/en/servicios/

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    Great info in here everyone. Bob, I do not mind the religious teachings; although not religious myself I don't see any harm - with that said, I just care that the student(s) or my son in this case are taught critical thinking skills as well as a heavy dose of science or sub-domain. Being an engineer myself these are the things I tend to value. The reason for the whole homeschooling idea was because from what I have observed from the schools here they are severly lacking in stimulating students to follow logical thought patterns.. to be fair - even in Ontario this can be lacking at some schools, but I find there is a lot of fluff here and the environments in context of learning here are not as conductive; both due to internal instional issues along with cultural and external (I can't really control this I know) but the fact that you walk in the street for 20 mins and you see enough illogical decisions and habits it tends to be contagious for some. Not complaining - I know how it is here but, just presenting my observations.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by arete92 View Post
    Great info in here everyone. Bob, I do not mind the religious teachings; although not religious myself I don't see any harm - with that said, I just care that the student(s) or my son in this case are taught critical thinking skills as well as a heavy dose of science or sub-domain. Being an engineer myself these are the things I tend to value. The reason for the whole homeschooling idea was because from what I have observed from the schools here they are severly lacking in stimulating students to follow logical thought patterns.. to be fair - even in Ontario this can be lacking at some schools, but I find there is a lot of fluff here and the environments in context of learning here are not as conductive; both due to internal instional issues along with cultural and external (I can't really control this I know) but the fact that you walk in the street for 20 mins and you see enough illogical decisions and habits it tends to be contagious for some. Not complaining - I know how it is here but, just presenting my observations.
    If you are willing to sacrifice living here and return to your home country for your child's education, why don't you also search the best schools here and investigate moving to another area of the country.

    My experience is that many private schools are fine for young children. They do a good job teaching the basics of reading, writing and math. However, after 5th grade, when the teachers need a broader education in science, math concepts, world history, etc. the schools begin to fall short. There simply is not an adequate number of teachers - especially at high school level- to teach chemistry, physics, calculus, etc. I can give you a local example, although this is a public school. Jamao has a vocational school. It is equipped with all that is needed for a chemistry lab, a physics lab, a mechanics program, and I don't remember what else. All equipment is stored in wood boxes brand new. Has been there for years. There are no qualified teachers available. The school was begging me to find teachers from abroad for them to start these courses.

    I would be curious to know more about the Santiago School of Robotics and Technology. I read in the news a couple of times that their students won international awards in competitions. Anyone know about this school?

    Anyway, your decision is not easy. I congratulate you on taking your child's education seriously. Since it is important to you, take some time and investigate the better private schools in the country. Might be an enjoyable visit to different parts of the country while also teaching your child the importance you place on his/her education.

    Good luck.
    Lindsey

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  8. #17
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    As Lindsay says, the very basics can be taught here in the right schools for the most part. Ultimately, it is the parents responsibility to ensure that their children's education is progressing as it should. This will probably mean some remedial work at home to solidify basic math, reading, vocabulary, geography and history.

    Languages is another area of concern. While here in Latin America, Spanish is important. I seem to recall you mentioning Ontario above, so French might be more of a benefit later in life. The time to teach languages is when the kids are young as that is when the kids learn them with the least difficulty.

    It's a tough call. The longer you are out of the system that your children will eventually end up in, the more of a challenge reentry and reintegration will be. I am of the opinion that this is not the country in which to pursue education if the family has other better options available to them. The DR remains a viable retirement or part time home for foreigners, but quickly begins to fall short if one needs to earn a living and raise children here.

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  10. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cdn_Gringo View Post
    As Lindsay says, the very basics can be taught here in the right schools for the most part. Ultimately, it is the parents responsibility to ensure that their children's education is progressing as it should. This will probably mean some remedial work at home to solidify basic math, reading, vocabulary, geography and history.

    Languages is another area of concern. While here in Latin America, Spanish is important. I seem to recall you mentioning Ontario above, so French might be more of a benefit later in life. The time to teach languages is when the kids are young as that is when the kids learn them with the least difficulty.

    It's a tough call. The longer you are out of the system that your children will eventually end up in, the more of a challenge reentry and reintegration will be. I am of the opinion that this is not the country in which to pursue education if the family has other better options available to them. The DR remains a viable retirement or part time home for foreigners, but quickly begins to fall short if one needs to earn a living and raise children here.
    https://stgeorge.do/upperschool/ Sounds like they teach critical thinking

  11. #19
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    As the parent of a child who went to four good private schools in the capital and one in Punta Cana, I can say that on the whole the quality of education he received was good. There was always an element of luck of the draw when it came to teachers, because the quality varied. Having said that most of his teachers, both Dominican and foreign, were very good.

    In any system or circumstances parental input is key for acquiring general knowledge through reading, watching quality programmes, exposure to arts and culture; developing personal responsibility, healthy habits, considerate behaviour and environmental awareness; learning about practical things and useful skills, especially critical thinking.

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  13. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by irsav View Post
    We thoroughly investigated Sosua International School in La Mulata. Spoke with the Administration. Double checked their claims that they are " officially affiliated in the USA". Requested lists of the students who graduated. To see their academic success. And we were shocked with what we found out.
    Diplomatic schools in SD are better. But driving every day to the capital back and forth - is not a legit idea. So we gave up on these plans.
    99% of immigrants from the Third World countries move to America for a better education and future of their children.
    Wishing all the best to the OP anyway!
    Uhm, what did you find out?

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