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  1. #1
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    Exclamation Dengue Fever!!!!!!!

    2 days ago, my 6yr old son, had no appetite, was very lethargic, diarrhea, complaining he was aching all over, was running a low grade fever. At about 6:30pm, his fever shot up from 99f to 103.2f, after a cool shower, we were off to the Capital, we went, to the Indepenca Clinic. By the time we got there, he had a rash on his chin, it looked like a group of 50 red little pimples. This all happened, in about 3 hours.

    They examined him, drew blood, and did some other testís. They gave him some medís for the fever, and told us to wait. About 3 hours later, the Doc came back and told us, he had, DENGUE FEVER, type 1. Plenty of rest, and fluids, and that it would run its course in a few days. He told us what to watch for, and said to bring him back, if he got worse. And that we would get a call from the lab, upon conformation, of the culture test. We got the call yesterday, he has D/F, type 1.

    I never heard of this before, so I posted this info below, as a FYI.
    My son is doing much better know, but I am still at a loss, that I never heard of this before.

    Thanks
    Tim H.

    ******************************************

    Dengue Fever and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) have become a major threat to the health of some 2.5 billion people worldwide (3). Dengue virus is transmitted primarily through the bite of the female Aedes aegypti mosquito, but in recent years, Aedes albopictus has also become an important vector (7). Due to the nature of the vector, this disease is considered a problem mainly in the tropics, but there have been reports of cases in Texas and Florida (2). Humans appear to be the only known reservoirs for both Dengue and DHF.

    This virus has four flavors, called serotypes, which are creatively named 1,2,3 and 4. Getting infected with one serotype does not protect you against the other serotypes; in fact, getting a second dengue infection, particularly with type 2, leads to an even worse infection. This manifests as either Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever or Dengue Shock Syndrome, which can be fatal. These are particularly dangerous in children, who suffer the most and who are at the greatest risk of dying from dengue. Still, most cases of dengue are benign (not-serious), ending after approximately 7 days.

    Dengue Fever and DHF are similar in presentation, but there are some notable differences. A high fever, typically up to 105*F, rash, nausea and vomiting, headache, and pain behind the eyes are all common symptoms (7). Severe muscle and joint pain are also frequently cited, which is why this disease was originally termed "breakbone fever" (2).
    This stage is followed by severe hemorrhagic manifestations, such as tendency to bruise easily or other types of skin hemorrhages, bleeding nose or gums, and possibly internal bleeding. Excessive plasma leakage from small vessels may lead to shock, followed by death, if circulatory failure is not corrected.

    Dengue has a short incubation period - often days, usually less than a week. The signs and symptoms of dengue include a sudden, rapidly climbing fever, a severe headache, nausea & vomiting, loss of appetite, rash and deep muscle and joint pains. The disease is nicknamed 'breakbone fever' for these last two symptoms. The rash usually shows up 3-4 days after the start of the symptoms and begins on the torso, spreading out to the face, arms and legs.

    There can be a few days respite but the fever and rash often recur, and this is known as the 'saddleback pattern'. With Dengue Hemorrhagic Feverr the blood cells are crippled and bleeding develops - in the gums, the skin, the intestinal tract. With the shock syndrome the blood vessels don't work quite right, and the blood pressure drops precipitously; as a result the blood fails to meet the metabolic demands of the cells in the body - which is the definition of shock.

    Currently there is not a vaccine available for Dengue virus (4). Researchers in Thailand are closest to developing a vaccine, but the earliest it would be available for wide dissemination is in 5-10 years (1). The best way to stop the spread of the disease is to cover anyone afflicted with dengue with mosquito netting in order to limit the number of mosquitoes who contract it from a human. It is also a good idea to get rid of any standing water in your yard, as this is the perfect breeding ground for mosquitoes.
    Last edited by Timex; 10-24-2003 at 08:18 AM.

  2. #2
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    Tim,
    We are glad to hear that he is going to be okay. This must have been quite a shock to you and your family. I think that I would have been terrified had it been my son. Thank you for sharing the information.

    The Mainers

  3. #3
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    Originally posted by Timex
    I never heard of this before, so I posted this info below, as a FYI.
    My son is doing much better know, but I am still at a loss, that I never heard of this before.
    Tim, glad your son will soon be ok.

    Dengue fever is well known in the DR. Every year there are notices in the paper of an outbreak in one area of the country or another. Usually in the poorer areas, but not necessarily. Anywhere there is standing water can be a breeding ground for the mosquitos that spread the disease. This can be a swampy area with little water movement, but can also be a bird bath, tires that have been junked and partially filled with water, or anything else that holds water. Because poor people normally are found living in areas where there is swampy ground, or where grounds maintenance is poor, this is why the outbreaks are normally in poor barrios. But it can happen anywhere, as you, unfortunately, found out.

  4. #4
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    I had dengue fever when I was a kid, in the DR. My 6 brothers and sisters and parents had it too. We were very uncomfortable for a while, but we got better. What I remember most was the pain behind my eyes. My mom was a nurse, so that helped, but they didn't have enough medicine for 9 people at once, so she rationed it. We all got better.
    Hope your son feels better soon!
    mk
    aka: dengue blonde

  5. #5
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    Default Sorry about your son Timex!

    Glad your son is recovering! Scarey situation....I am thankful for the info as I had never heard of that disease...Pam

  6. #6
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    Tim, hope your son feels better soon. I have myself a 6year old daughter, so I know exactly how scary it is, when you child is sick.

    I'm actually surprised, that you and so many others never heart of Dengue fever before. Like Ken said, it's a very well known disease here in the DR, caused by the bite of a certain type of mosquito called Aedes. Aedes mosquitoes breed in standing water.
    To help to control the spread of dengue fever, the government is broadcasting since years in TV and Radio, to remove, repair, or empty anything that collects water, such as roof gutters, flower pots, used tires, and plastic containers around your home and work areas.

    quaqualita

  7. #7
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    Your son is very lucky.

    Two years ago, my brother in law almost died of Dengue.

    He was sailing along the south coast when he was bit by a mosquito.

    In two days he was in "Clinica Abreu" and if it wasn't for an unbelievably good set of doctors, he would have died. He ended up in Intensive Care with kidney and heat failure... It was a close call.

    The sad thing is that there's virtually nothing you can do once you have the infection.

    Mosquito repellent might be the best way to minimize risk.

  8. #8
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    Default Thank You Timex

    My daughter is 2 and a half - I appreciate the info and hope your son gets better soon.
    Stay well,
    Amy

  9. #9
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    Thumbs up THANKS!!!!!!!!

    Thanks, for the Get Well Wishes, for my Son!!!
    He is almost completely over it.


    The thing that caught me off guard, was that, Iíve been in more Foreign Countries than the U.S. has States.

    I never heard of this before!
    I Thank God it was the mild version, and not the other type!!!!


    Thanks Again

  10. #10
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    Tim,
    Very sorry to hear about your son's illness, but glad to hear it is over.

    I too am surprised you had never heard of dengue fever before in your travels. Even more so since I know that SESPAS (the health service there) does a public info campaign on dengue every year.

    I've posted info from WHO, PAHO & CDC on here in the past about dengue. Thank god the DR has not had the hemorrhagic type -- yet! DHF has been slow in its penetration of Latin America, but it is penetrating. It made its first dramatic appearance in Havana in 1981, causing at least 344,000 illnesses, more than 116,000 hospitalizations and 158 deaths.

    One thing that people in the DR sometimes tend to say about dengue that infuriates me is that dengue tends to happen in poor areas or on the border with Haiti. This leads those listening into a false sense of security, thinking if they just avoid those spots, they might be safe. Rubbish!!! Mosquitos do not discriminate! In fact, many dengue cases occur in high-priced areas of SD every year. You may not hear about it, but it happens. I know several non-poor folks in the DR who have gotten dengue, and it was not from hanging arround in poor barrios. As Ken rightly points out, any place there is standing water can serve as a breeding ground for the infected mosquito, no matter where that water is located.

    I hate to say this, but you should know. What some sources do not discuss, but probably should, is that tropical medicine experts have come to the conclusion that exposure to Type I dengue makes one more susceptible to Type II (DHF).

    If you wish some good books, articles, internet sites etc on the subject, contact me and I'll gladly recommend some.

    My personal interest comes from my wife getting it while we lived in SD. One week of steady fever and all-body aches -- pure misery. And there was little we could do about it except rest and finding ways to keep her cool (difficult when we had power outages constantly and no generator in the house).

    Best Regards,
    Keith
    Last edited by Keith R; 10-26-2003 at 02:55 PM.

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