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  1. #1
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    Default Let this be a lesson to us all

    The tragedy in Jimaní was caused by Man. The River Sillié ( a creek in Texas or West Virginia) enters Dominican territory from Haití. In the watershed of the little creek there are no trees. They have all been cut down for firewood and charcoal.
    Each little raindrop of the 254 mm (about 10 inches?) that fell in the area over the prior 24 hours, raised up just a tiny amount of mud. There was no escape from the wall of mud and water that rushed down the Sillié. Just last night the National Geographic channel had a show on mudslides and land slides.
    There will be hundreds of dead. We will probably never know exactly how many.
    If any person in the Dominican Republic needs a message about the value of the forest cover, let this be it. Pictures of the dead stacked like cordwood should be in every school, in every office in every house....all because There were no trees

    HB

  2. #2
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    Default well said!!!!

    a lot of people there are too irresponsible when it comes to anything to do with enviroment and it is catching up with them quick.

  3. #3
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    Default Agree

    The Haitians have ravage their landscape and it looks like the moon or Mars "barren". A tragedy that was caused by an inept non caring government of the country and the lack of education of the populace. Don't let this kind of thing happen in the DR, as HB says take heed and learn the value of trees and reforestation.

    We also have had a deluge of rain (4+ inches) over the past weekend, creeks and rivers rose, some flooding of low lying area's but no loss of life, no mud slides, all due to trees and building regulations.

  4. #4
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    Default The Haitian Experience

    It has been a traditional custom for the Haitians to cut down the trees to make charcoal as cooking fuel. This practice has devastated the country and when you fly over the island you can clearly see the brown mountains of Haiti compared to the green ones of the Dominican Republic. However, this practice has crept over the border, especially into the backwards southwest, where authorities look the other way, by way of a pay-off, in order to now destroy our forests to sell the charcoal to Haiti or the local market. I still see occasional trucks full of charcoal heading from the southwest to Santo Domingo.

    In addition, I have the misfortune of having to travel the Bani-Santo Domingo highway on a regular basis and witness the dozens of trucks full of sand and gravel being taken from the riverbeds. These trucks not only are contributing to kill our rivers but also complicate traffic flow in this narrow highway and make driving it much more dangerous. In addition, their poorly covered truck beds let fly rocks which destroy windshields regularly; I have been running around with a cracked windshield for over a year and do not replace it since I get these pings constantly while driving this infernal highway. And the authorities?...Very well, thank you.

  5. #5
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    Off all the Liberal Tree hugging audacity!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Why do you think that they cut down those trees? To improve the view?
    I guess you guys believe that it is better to starve than to spoil your precious river!

  6. #6
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    Default let's not blame the Haitians

    "Don't let this kind of thing happen in the DR, as HB says ..."

    Unfortunately, it's already happening. Not long ago, I took some picture in Azua, where deforastation is already taking its toll, some of the pictures were published in the first page of local newspapers. Then I got some messages accusing me of having taken the pictures in Haiti. Someone even screamed at me that I was 'trying to make us look like savages'. Haitianization in the Southeast has already begun. I mean the loss of top soil, where only the bare bedrock is left, and not even goats can survive. In some places we have reached the point of no return.

    Mirador

  7. #7
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    Default haven't they heard of gas and electricity?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony C
    Off all the Liberal Tree hugging audacity!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Why do you think that they cut down those trees? To improve the view?
    I guess you guys believe that it is better to starve than to spoil your precious river!
    So it's ok to leave the land bare for future generations just so they don't have to get other alternative fuels? Haven't they heard of gas or electricity?

    In the worst case, for every tree they knock down they should plant 10! Fortunately, the DR has become aware and has had programs like Quisqueya Verde where millions of trees have been planted. We still have time to avoid becoming Haitianized!

  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tony C
    Off all the Liberal Tree hugging audacity!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Why do you think that they cut down those trees? To improve the view?
    I guess you guys believe that it is better to starve than to spoil your precious river!
    And if they ruin the land and its prospects for growing food in the process, that somehow makes sense or is ok to you, Tony?

  9. #9
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    Default starving people cant afford to care

    If there was only one snow goose left in the workld and it landed beside a starving man he would eat it.
    I think the point being made is to prevent this same disaster in the DR everyone needs to prevent this kind of hopelessness.
    Having said that are there any fast growing tropical trees similar to the Poplar in temperate zones that could be used to make charcoal? A little steardship could alleviate many problems.
    John

  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith R
    And if they ruin the land and its prospects for growing food in the process, that somehow makes sense or is ok to you, Tony?
    Hard to tell people not to cut down a tree for tomorrow when they are hungry today!
    I just can't believe how some self-absorb, self-appointed protectors of the earth can act like as if these people deserved what happened to them.
    These people are just struggling to survive.
    You want to help the enviroment? Help Business. The better the economy then the people will have money to have electric stoves and to buy wood & Concrete to build houses.

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