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  1. #1
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    Default AZB.....I need your help!!

    Ok AZB.....I need some help here!
    Mara kindly took a book of recipes written in Hindi to India with her to have translated for me but I need some help with some of the ingredients.
    If you could , would you please tell me what exactly these things are?
    Ladyfingers - ( okra ) aka :bhindi
    Drumsticks - (corn ?) aka: saijan ki phali
    Chilka - (what kind of rind is it?)
    Brinjal- ( eggplant? ) aka: baingan
    Spring onions (Green onions?) aka: hara pyaj
    Green Banana (platanos?) aka: Kachcha Kela
    Margosa - ( ) aka: Neem
    Trotters - (cow's feet?) aka: Paya

    Anyone else who may know are welcome to answer.......
    I'll add more as I peruse the translations!

    Thanks!

    Now it's off to the kitchen to mix up some sambar powder!
    Last edited by MommC; 08-27-2004 at 12:07 AM. Reason: added definitions!

  2. #2
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    Default

    bhindi = okra or ladies fingers, molondrones in DR

    brinjal = eggplant/aubergine, berenjena in Spanish

    My mouth is watering.

    Chiri

  3. #3
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    Maybe this can help you MommC

    http://theory.tifr.res.in/bombay/his...ine/vocab.html

    errr... when r u going to cook indian food for us???

    Jess

  4. #4
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    read below
    Last edited by AZB; 08-26-2004 at 04:31 PM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MommC
    Ok AZB.....I need some help here!
    Mara kindly took a book of recipes written in Hindi to India with her to have translated for me but I need some help with some of the ingredients.
    If you could , would you please tell me what exactly these things are?
    Ladyfingers - ( ) aka :bhindi
    Drumsticks - (corn or maybe okra?) aka: saijan ki phali
    Chilka - (what kind of rind is it?)
    Brinjal- ( eggplant? ) aka: baingan
    Spring onions (Green onions?) aka: hara pyaj
    Green Banana (platanos?) aka: Kachcha Kela
    Margosa - ( ) aka: Neem
    Trotters - (pig's feet?) aka: Paya

    Anyone else who may know are welcome to answer.......
    I'll add more as I peruse the translations!

    Thanks!

    Now it's off to the kitchen to mix up some sambar powder!
    Not an expert but here it goes:

    lady finger (british english) = Okra

    Chilka ??? = means "skin or shell" of something

    baingan = eggplant

    Hara Pyaz = green onion maybe the long green onions that chinese use for cooking (name escaped my mind).

    green banana (khacha kela) = unriped banana

    Paya = always cow's feet

    Good luck
    AZB

  6. #6
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    Default Keep 'em coming!!!

    I knew the okra was in there somewhere but wasn't sure. Had the eggplant down tho' !
    Now if someone knows what in heck the "drumsticks" are.......there's several recipes that sound real tasty but the main ingredient is an unknown.

    Thanks AZB for verifiying that "spring" onions are indeed the "green" onion otherwise known as scallions that we LOVE especially when they're fresh picked from the garden.

    I had an awful time figuring out the "curd" until I realized that sometimes it means yoghurt and sometimes it's "sour" curd aka buttermilk!
    Cant' wait to get down there an try my hand at preserving some "amchoor/amchur" aka sun dried powdered green mango! Think I'll be able to sun dry those? I'm going to buy a grinder my first trip into San Pedro. I already know which distributor has 'em!

    Don't know when I'll be cooking for y'all - gotta try these out on myself first! They'll only get served to guests if they WOW me first!
    Maybe I should warn y'all that ghee definitely isn't on the menu but I'm going to try my hand at pappams and chapati this week. Maybe even some nam!

    So keep those ingredient translations coming.......the more I have the more dishes I'll be able to try!

  7. #7
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    In English, Drumsticks(the food type) are chicken legs. Trotters are pig's feet, Ladyfingers are a type of light biscuit, almost a sponge, frequently used in trifle. I guess you have to consider the context of the other ingredients??

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by stan chapman
    In English, Drumsticks(the food type) are chicken legs. Trotters are pig's feet, Ladyfingers are a type of light biscuit, almost a sponge, frequently used in trifle. I guess you have to consider the context of the other ingredients??
    ....you are absolutely right. although lady fingers was obviously okra in the original post, they are also a biscuit as well.

    funnily enough.....'fish fingers' also has two meanings.

  9. #9
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    Default However we are talking an East Indian translation to English from Hindi!

    Quote Originally Posted by stan chapman
    In English, Drumsticks(the food type) are chicken legs. Trotters are pig's feet, Ladyfingers are a type of light biscuit, almost a sponge, frequently used in trifle. I guess you have to consider the context of the other ingredients??
    As English is MY first language I am well aware of the British/North American meaning of "drumstick's,trotters,lady fingers and fish finger/sticks" however the "drumsticks" referred to are definitely some type of vegetable as was the "ladyfingers"! As AZB pointed out the "trotters" were most likely cow's feet as the hindi word I posted always refers to something beef!

    So please......if anyone knows what "drumsticks" are I'm still waiting for an answer.

    In the next few days I'll post more queries (I already figured out that "jaggery" was cane sugar in it's "raw" form).
    The lists available on the web have been quite informative however "drumsticks remain drumsticks" in every translation I've been able to find.

  10. #10
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    Default As English is MY first language I am well aware of the British/North American meaning

    Last time I try to be helpful to you, Madam.

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