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  1. #1
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    Default Why so many Jeepetas & a strong peso!

    I noticed of the past few years, regardless of the situation with the exchange rate, that more and more new jeepetas (the expensive ones from Mitsubisihi and Toyota) seem to be populating the streets. Luxury cars are no exception either. I can't stop at a traffic light in Santo Domingo without a new Jeepeta or Mercedes waiting next to me. The reason I ask this question is because interest rates are high and wages in general are low for most people. How are so many people able to afford these vehicles.

  2. #2
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    Contrary to belief, dominicans have money....lots of money.

  3. #3
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    ...and more often than not, crushing debts and warped priorities.

    Take Barcelona, a city in the developed world, known for its affluence and sheer style. When I last visited a year and a half ago, I went with my Dominican husband, who remarked that despite all the glamour and obvious wealth, you did not see more than one or two jeepetas in a single day trudging around the city.

    Contrast this capital of world culture and good taste with the city of Santo Domingo, where at any given moment in most parts of the city you can count them by the dozen.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chirimoya
    ...and more often than not, crushing debts and warped priorities.

    Take Barcelona, a city in the developed world, known for its affluence and sheer style. When I last visited a year and a half ago, I went with my Dominican husband, who remarked that despite all the glamour and obvious wealth, you did not see more than one or two jeepetas in a single day trudging around the city.

    Contrast this capital of world culture and good taste with the city of Santo Domingo, where at any given moment in most parts of the city you can count them by the dozen.
    But in Europe each liter of gas will cost you ~1.20 euro which is US$1,53, so gallon will cost around US$5,79 (~RD$173) and situation with parking is worse than here. Thats why you did not see more than one or two jeepetas, but in Europe, you can see much more Ferrari's, Lamborghini's, Benleys, etc. than here.

  5. #5
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    So from what I gather, you see more of those expensive vehicles in Sto. Domingo than here in Los Angeles. The question still remains how do they-Dominicans-do it? Do they buy cash or on high interest payments? And who are these Dominicans driving these status symbol vehicles, anyway? Where do they get those pesos from? Are they new rich or returning US Dominicans?
    It's certainly a puzzle to me.

  6. #6
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    Default it has always been like that

    Years ago I read that Santo Domingo had the highest number of Mercedes' in all of Latin America. Nowadays they go for jeepeta's.
    Rich, or new rich Dominicans like to show off on the Malecon, they like their status symbols. It's not very wise given the recent rise in crime, but it's their culture. Where they all get the money from is a mystery to me.
    Bartolomeo

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    I should think why so many by jeepeta's might have something to do with the road standards to do....

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    Default Moscow Russia

    The people that live in Third World countries and underprivileged countries education is few and far between. you have good education like in Russia and all of Europe but no jobs, or you live in a Third World country with some jobs and no education therefore only the few can afford that lifestyle due to economic growth and stability for which the country you live in. Moscow is the number one city in the world as far as expense for travelers. Many beautiful automobiles but you say to yourself how can they afford it who knows but they do. And I'm sure when I go to the DR I will say the same but I also know that there are fewer high quality automobiles that I will see so it catches your attention more.

  9. #9
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    Talking Don't forget the government

    ..or the elected mafioso, whatever you want to call them. They are surely one of the most commonly seen owners* (assuming they didn't steal it from someone) of the SUV/prestige vehicle. That alone is a huge amount of vehicles in the city; I think they have more employees than the U.S. gov't.

    Great point Chiri, many live well beyond their means; and there's no better "bling", than the kind you can drive.

    The "road standards" is the only valid arguement really.

    I realize it's all about the look and whatever, but to me the biggest fools have to be the people that chop down their rides; attaching fairings, scoops and what not. Common sense would be to increase the distance between dog carcasses and drainage canals—and your car, not DEcrease it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by juancarlos
    So from what I gather, you see more of those expensive vehicles in Sto. Domingo than here in Los Angeles. The question still remains how do they-Dominicans-do it? Do they buy cash or on high interest payments? And who are these Dominicans driving these status symbol vehicles, anyway? Where do they get those pesos from? Are they new rich or returning US Dominicans?
    It's certainly a puzzle to me.
    It is such a wide spectrum behind the wheels of these vehicles that they cease to have value as status symbols. One example - a friend of a friend, lives in a rented house in a lower-middle class area (somewhere in the zona oriental), gets laid off from his job, and spends all the 'liquidacion' money on a nearly new luxury jeepeta. He still lives in a modest house that he does not own, in a run down area, and doesn't know where his next paycheck is coming from, but hey - he's got his jeepeta so he has 'made it'.

    I agree about the need for a vehicle with good road clearance, but I don't think that's the prime motivation for the owners of all the new BMWs, Mercedes or Porsche SUVs, all of which are common sights on the streets of Santo Domingo these days.

    For me it's a sign of immaturity and bad taste, this apparent desperation to flaunt wealth. I was taught that if you have class and style, no matter how rich you are, you don't need to tell the world about it.

    In any case I would be even more of a bundle of nerves than I already am, if I was responsible for such an expensive lump of metal, the way people drive in this city.

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