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  1. #1
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    Default Revisiting Stove Topic...

    Allow me to revisit this topic. I found a gas stove in the USA that I would like to purchase. Now for you who have recently been through the process of bringing a gas stove here...what changes need to be made to it and what at what cost?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Default Converting A Stove From Natural To Propane

    Poking around the internet I answered my own question...thought I would share this with all....

    1) New ranges ship from the factory already set up for natural gas. There are at least a couple of reasons for this:

    a) A higher percentage of our population uses natural gas
    b) It's easier to convert to LP than back from LP to natural

    There are basically two types of ranges to deal with: those with sealed top burners, which are pretty much the standard today, and the conventional, 'non-sealed' ones.

    While they operate in much the same way, their conversion is usually different. There are still a few ranges that use adjustable sealed burner orifices, but most are 'fixed' and must be individually replaced to convert each burner from one fuel to another.

    (An orifice is simply a small brass fitting with a specifically sized hole very accurately drilled through it, and, if adjustable, has a provision to change the size of this hole by turning closed a threaded portion).

    Either way, basically what you're doing when going from natural gas to LP is changing to a smaller orifice to allow for the higher pressure supplied by the 'bottled' gas (The available energy in each ft of gas is different too, but for our purpose here that's not important). Natural gas supplies typically run around a pressure of 5.5 inches water column, while LP runs at twice that pressure, averaging around 11 inches. The orifice through which the gas travels to the burner must be smaller to accommodate this difference.

    Adjustable orifices are simply 'snugged' down, clockwise, with a 1/2 inch open-end wrench, to convert them. Nearly all oven burners use these too - more about that in a minute.

    Fixed orifices are replaced, and the good news is: the LP parts are usually included with the new range. On some brands (GE being one), the unused set is attached to a storage point on the stove, and this is a great idea. This way, they can't get lost, and if you ever want to convert back, there they are!

    The not-so-good news: these little top burner orifices very often require a metric wrench to remove & install. And some can't be changed without a very slender wrench or nut driver.

    A very useful tip I picked up many years ago: to hold that little orifice in a regular nut driver or socket, tear a very small piece of paper towel, hold it over the open socket, then push the orifice into the socket. The paper does a great job of holding the orifice into the wrench, preventing its being dropped into the 'innards' of the range.

    The installation instructions that come with your range will usually be pretty clear on which orifices go into each burner head. Many new cook tops use as many as three different sized burners, each with a different BTU rating and orifice size. I usually start by laying the correct orifice beside its corresponding burner, just to be sure I get them right the first time. Again, the instructions should be clear on this. Some use a color code system, while others use size numbers. (Note to manufacturers: here's another area that needs a standardized system!)

    One detail that's commonly overlooked on these is the simmer settings. Each top burner valve has a small screw inside its shaft that can be adjusted to provide a low simmer. This adjustment must be made on each burner once the range has been converted, or 'simmer' settings will be far too high to be useful.

    A small-bladed screwdriver is needed for most of these. If you can't find one small enough, it's possible to grind one down to fit. I've noticed some of the most recent ranges are using a larger screw that's a lot easier to access, and that's a welcome change.

    That should help get you through the top burner conversion. Not as hard as it sounds, and stay with us -the rest is much easier.

    First convert the regulator. This is the part to which the inlet connects. Remove the vent cap, flip the insert over and reinsert it (You'll usually see 'NAT' on one side and 'LP' on the other). Reinstall the cap, and that's done.

    Then, find the brass orifice that supplies the bake burner (usually under the range, behind the drawer), and if included, the broil burner (usually inside the oven). These are adjustable, and, like adjustable top burners, are simply 'snugged' down clockwise with a 1/2 inch wrench.

    Then turn the oven on, keeping in mind that it may take up to 2 minutes for ignition to occur. Watch the burner flame. If, after burning for a minute or so, it pulls noisily away from the burner, it's getting too much primary air. Simply loosen the screw on the air shutter, where you just turned down the orifice, and close this shutter down a bit to reduce air into the mixture. If the flame is yellow-tipped and appears 'soft' (you'll know if you see it), open the shutter a bit to increase air into the mix. This adjustment isn't critical, and will rarely have to be done. But you should now about it. Again, the instructions should mention this.

    Congratulations! Your new stove's flames should be a cheerful, even blue, and you just saved yourself some serious money.

  3. #3
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    Default natural or LP

    Many new ranges can ship already set up for LP from the manufactuer. Most of the stoves we have looked at give the buyer the option of how they want the stove set up when shipped. The stove that we will be bringing will be set up at the factory for LP. Where we live now (foothills west of Denver) we have used LP until about 2 years ago when Natural gas finally arrived here.

    Bob K

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snuffy
    Allow me to revisit this topic. I found a gas stove in the USA that I would like to purchase. Now for you who have recently been through the process of bringing a gas stove here...what changes need to be made to it and what at what cost?

    Thanks.
    When you take in the hassle factor and the cost of shipping, why wouldn't you buy one here?

    What is so special about the one you want from the USA?

  5. #5
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    Default Recommendation

    Buy here.

    There is guarantee/warranty on appliances sold here. There is an ample supply of service and parts for the products sold here. Products purchased offshore their guarantee/warranty is invalid in the D.R., and parts may be hard to find or match locally.

    Regards,
    PJT

  6. #6
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    Default Stoves In The DR......10 Years Of Experience!

    I have had 3 stoves in 10 years! Never underestimate the power of a Dominican to destroy a stove!(An "aside",forget the "simmer" setting,it will NEVER be used here in the DR,unless YOU cook! Dominicans only use the "HIGH" setting as they like everything "overcooked")
    It goes like this: The "cook" will only use the high setting.Everything will boil over onto the stove top and burners.She will continue to cook until whatever has burned into a mass of carbonized cement on top of the stove!
    ("Orientals" take pride in cooking a pot of rice until it is cooked to perfection.Dominicans take pride in cooking a pot of rice until it is burned into the bottom of the pan! this "Con Con" will later be eaten like a "ricechip"!)She will then use a combination of "Steel Wool" and "other" abrasives until the metal shows through the porceline finish of the stove.On "Stove Cleaning Day"She will remove the burners(doesn't matter if you have the "so-called" sealed burners,my maid was so proud that she was able to "un-stick" the burners in my stove,and remove those "Wires" too!)SS000000000oooo,that was pretty much the end of my beautiful "Maytag" stove!
    I agree with Robert,buy your stove here.Buy a "Dominicanized" stove.The burners come apart by just lifting them off the stove top.They have parts available on every streetcorner.They can be repaired very easily and cheaply.And,the maids can boil the "Pi$$" out of everything their heart desires,clean the burners,and put them back as good as new!
    CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC

  7. #7
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    Default Solution

    Quote Originally Posted by Criss Colon
    I have had 3 stoves in 10 years! Never underestimate the power of a Dominican to destroy a stove!(An "aside",forget the "simmer" setting,it will NEVER be used here in the DR,unless YOU cook! Dominicans only use the "HIGH" setting as they like everything "overcooked")
    It goes like this: The "cook" will only use the high setting.Everything will boil over onto the stove top and burners.She will continue to cook until whatever has burned into a mass of carbonized cement on top of the stove!
    ("Orientals" take pride in cooking a pot of rice until it is cooked to perfection.Dominicans take pride in cooking a pot of rice until it is burned into the bottom of the pan! this "Con Con" will later be eaten like a "ricechip"!)She will then use a combination of "Steel Wool" and "other" abrasives until the metal shows through the porceline finish of the stove.On "Stove Cleaning Day"She will remove the burners(doesn't matter if you have the "so-called" sealed burners,my maid was so proud that she was able to "un-stick" the burners in my stove,and remove those "Wires" too!)SS000000000oooo,that was pretty much the end of my beautiful "Maytag" stove!
    I agree with Robert,buy your stove here.Buy a "Dominicanized" stove.The burners come apart by just lifting them off the stove top.They have parts available on every streetcorner.They can be repaired very easily and cheaply.And,the maids can boil the "Pi$$" out of everything their heart desires,clean the burners,and put them back as good as new!
    CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC

    DON'T LET THEM TOUCH YOUR STOVE !!!!
    The one thing that I will personally take care of are my stove and cooking stuff. No one touches them.......

    Bob K

  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Criss Colon
    I have had 3 stoves in 10 years! Never underestimate the power of a Dominican to destroy a stove!(An "aside",forget the "simmer" setting,it will NEVER be used here in the DR,unless YOU cook! Dominicans only use the "HIGH" setting as they like everything "overcooked")
    It goes like this: The "cook" will only use the high setting.Everything will boil over onto the stove top and burners.She will continue to cook until whatever has burned into a mass of carbonized cement on top of the stove!
    ("Orientals" take pride in cooking a pot of rice until it is cooked to perfection.Dominicans take pride in cooking a pot of rice until it is burned into the bottom of the pan! this "Con Con" will later be eaten like a "ricechip"!)She will then use a combination of "Steel Wool" and "other" abrasives until the metal shows through the porceline finish of the stove.On "Stove Cleaning Day"She will remove the burners(doesn't matter if you have the "so-called" sealed burners,my maid was so proud that she was able to "un-stick" the burners in my stove,and remove those "Wires" too!)SS000000000oooo,that was pretty much the end of my beautiful "Maytag" stove!
    I've had the same experiences. When my wife came to the US, we had a brand new Jenn Air stove. She would always cook on high, letting the pot boil over. After three months, the stovetop looked like it was 30 yeas old. It was the same routine with our Dominican housekeeper.

    But I have to admit, the bottom of the pot, if eaten before it cooled, tasted great!

  9. #9
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    Default

    well you have to teach them just like you have to teach them everything else.

    Robert, yes you are probably correct about buying here. My circumstance is a little unique and that makes it smart to buy this stove and have it shipped here. There will be people shipping all of their households here, including a stove, and thus I thought this info. would be beneficial.

  10. #10
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    Default

    If you can ship it down cheaply, then why not.

    I must admit, this has been a pretty funny thread, thanks CC

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