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  1. #1
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    Lightbulb how does it work with your baby born in dominican republic

    how does it work with your baby born in dominican republic hello everyone I am 7weeks pregnant and me and my husband are both americans I was raised in dominican republic my husband and I want to have the baby born in dominican republic but we are ont sure how it would work as far as the passport and how long before I have to wait to leave and come back to the states, and how does the passport work will it be domincan passport or american with place of birth in domican republic?

  2. #2
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    Unless you have Dominican nationality, or are a legal resident, by law your baby will only be an American. You would have to apply for the US passport at the US Consulate in Santo Domingo once the baby is born.

  3. #3
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    You will also need to prove 1 parent lived in the states for at least 5 years in order to get citizenship for your child. This is not the easiest thing to do, but for most it is doable, Definitely a hassle.

    I for one had a very unorthodox life, home-schooled self employed, so it will be nearly impossible for me but I am trying anyway.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMike
    I for one had a very unorthodox life, home-schooled self employed, so it will be nearly impossible for me but I am trying anyway.
    Did you fill out an income tax return? Pay any kind of tax, apply for driver's license, doctor's records.

    I wasn't sure how much of your life was spent in the US.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anna Coniglio
    Did you fill out an income tax return? Pay any kind of tax, apply for driver's license, doctor's records.

    I wasn't sure how much of your life was spent in the US.
    Filed income tax once, I did work a few different jobs and somewhere out there is a record of my presence in the US, but none of my former employees keep records for more than 5 years and I have been over here for 6 now.

    Got some speeding tickets too, paid rent, registered vehicles, had insurance, used credit cards etc. but long ago and far away.

    I am thinking about getting one of those online background checks done on myself, maybe that will do it, just so many of those websites seem like scams.

  6. #6
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    Default Go over to the Consulate and check it out for yourselves

    After 9/11 everything is all bent out of shape.

    Take everything you have with you. All of the proof or your citizenship and your 5 years of residency after you were 14!. If you cannot prove this your baby will not be considered for US citizenship.

    Since you are living here, I am supposing this, "legally" , your child can apply for a Dominican passport since it will be born of parents legally residing in the DR.

    HB

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hillbilly
    After 9/11 everything is all bent out of shape.

    Take everything you have with you. All of the proof or your citizenship and your 5 years of residency after you were 14!. If you cannot prove this your baby will not be considered for US citizenship.

    Since you are living here, I am supposing this, "legally" , your child can apply for a Dominican passport since it will be born of parents legally residing in the DR.

    HB
    Only 1 of the 5 years need to be after you were 14

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrMike
    Only 1 of the 5 years need to be after you were 14
    Actually two (2).

    Quote Originally Posted by ACS Consular section USA Embassy in DR
    The most common requirement is five years of physical presence, and thus we will use that as an example. In such cases, the American citizen parent must prove to the consular officer that he or she has been physically present in the United States for a period of no less than five years, at least two of them after age 14. The burden of proof falls upon the applicant and it is not, sometimes, an easy one.
    Source: ACS Consular section USA Embassy in DR

    If you attended 4 years of elementary or junior high school in the USA you'll have proof for 3 years. Each school year is accepted as proof for 9 months. All you'll need to prove are the two remaining years. If you attended college An official college transcript could be used as proof. I think you can get a copy of your school record from the Board of Education in the state you attended.

    I went through this same process 18 months ago and it went smooth. Good Luck.

    NotLurking.

  9. #9
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    Oh, one more thing, if you and your 'wife' are both American citizens, you or your wife need only prove one (1) day physical presences in the USA. This applies equally to naturalized American citizens.


    Here is the law.

    Quote Originally Posted by INA Sec. 301. (8 U.S.C. 1401)
    The following shall be nationals and citizens of the United States at birth:
    (a) a person born in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof;
    (b) a person born in the United States to a member of an Indian, Eskimo, Aleutian, or other aboriginal tribe: Provided, That the granting of citizenship under this subsection shall not in any manner impair or otherwise affect the right of such person to tribal or other property;
    (c) a person born outside of the United States and its outlying possessions of parents both of whom are citizens of the United States and one of whom has had a residence in the United States or one of its outlying possessions, prior to the birth of such person;
    (d) a person born outside of the United States and its outlying possessions of parents one of whom is a citizen of the United States who has been physically present in the United States or one of its outlying possessions for a continuous period of one year prior to the birth of such person, and the other of whom is a national, but not a citizen of the United States;
    (e) a person born in an outlying possession of the United States of parents one of whom is a citizen of the United States who has been physically present in the United States or one of its outlying possessions for a continuous period of one year at any time prior to the birth of such person;
    (f) a person of unknown parentage found in the United States while under the age of five years, until shown, prior to his attaining the age of twenty-one years, not to have been born in the United States;
    (g) a person born outside the geographical limits of the United States and its outlying possessions of parents one of whom is an alien, and the other a citizen of the United States who, prior to the birth of such person, was physically present in the United States or its outlying possessions for a period or periods totaling not less than five years, at least two of which were after attaining the age of fourteen years: Provided, That any periods of honorable service in the Armed Forces of the United States, or periods of employment with the United States Government or with an international organization as that term is defined in section 288 of title 22 by such citizen parent, or any periods during which such citizen parent is physically present abroad as the dependent unmarried son or daughter and a member of the household of a person
    (A) honorably serving with the Armed Forces of the United States, or
    (B) employed by the United States Government or an international organization as defined in section 288 of title 22, may be included in order to satisfy the physical-presence requirement of this paragraph. This proviso shall be applicable to persons born on or after December 24, 1952, to the same extent as if it had become effective in its present form on that date; and
    (h) a person born before noon (Eastern Standard Time) May 24, 1934, outside the limits and jurisdiction of the United States of an alien father and a mother who is a citizen of the United States who, prior to the birth of such person, had resided in the United States.
    Source: 8 U.S.C. 1401 or INA: ACT Sec. 301


    NotLurking
    Last edited by NotLurking; 05-23-2005 at 05:49 PM.

  10. #10
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    Talking thank you for the response

    thank you so much for the responses...I am currently living in atlanta georgia but I WOULD LIKE FOR MY BABY TO BE BORN IN DOMINICAN REPUBLIC I went to high school in new york and I have been back in the states for the past 8 years...so I think that is enough proof that I need for when the baby is born....I however do not reside in D.R yet will that be an issue?

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