Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 40
  1. #1
    Regular
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    212
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Why don't Dominicans manage?

    It was posted that their are plenty of opportunities in the DR. Then my question was, how come Dominicans in their own country cannot manage?

    The reply was that that is something for another post. So does anyone have any comments or answers?

  2. #2
    Regular
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    231
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Loaded topic

    First off I see many Dominican's manageing just fine, so it's a dangerous topic if we are going to paint it with a broad stroke. In the spirit of conversation though one attitude I have witnessed that impede's some Dominican's from manageing is a lack of faith that they can get ahead here.

    For instance, my wife has a young woman who she helped raise in Cotui. She sacrificed much for her providing her with a basic education, food, shelter etc. She also paid for her to train in Hair care, beauty salon work. Now, this young woman has clientele all over Cotui but has not taken the steps to improve her work environment. She has a ramshakle little hut with no air flow, uncomfortable chairs, no real equipment etc., but she still manages to eat and pay rent etc. However she spends all of her time trying to find a way out of the country, whether to Europe to work in "hair care", , or in Yola to Puerto Rico. So, a month ago she find's enough people to lend her money (we were notone of them) and comes up with $40,000 peso's to get onto a "reliable" Yola and off she goes. 3 day's later after running out of gas in the Mona passage and nearly dieing they are picked up and returned to the Dominican Republic. She was quite traumatized, however she is ready to go with the experience again. Now, IF she had taken that $40,000 and invested it in her business she would be set for life here. She has a commodity that is in high demand and she does a good job at it. It is the furthest thing from her mind though... she just cannot visualize bettering her situation in her home country.


    Ian

  3. #3
    Bronze
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,477
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    For every story of someone not managing there is one of someone managing. That is why I'm just going to stay out of this thread.

  4. #4
    Regular
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    44
    Post Thanks / Like

    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Fred
    It was posted that their are plenty of opportunities in the DR. Then my question was, how come Dominicans in their own country cannot manage?

    The reply was that that is something for another post. So does anyone have any comments or answers?
    You'll have to explain the meaning of "manage" and compared to what.

    If we see "dominicans" with our 1st world eyes and believe that they shall have our standards then we'll see that they're are not "managing". Not everyone buys into the "consume society" or believes that "quality of life is measured by how much you make or the size of your mortgage and monthly payments"

    I remember a client telling me "how poor the dominicans were" and then told me that his credit cards were max and unable to pay the monthly rent. Who is poorer? I see people posting on this forum pretending to be affluent and feeling sorry for the dominicans because they come from a rich, 1st world country. 1st world, rich countries are full of poor people, espiritually, obese,drugaddicts and having a negative "net worth". Aren't we attracted to the Dominican way of life because of the "quality of life" found here?

  5. #5
    Regular
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    231
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Well said

    I agree with those sentiments too Palmiche.

    Ian

  6. #6
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    497
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I want to put a personal point off vue here. I found out that the majority of Dominicans that i've met have 2 things in common . First off all their spirit and "joie de vivre" and second their lack off problemsolving skills for those problems that involve medium or long term planning.

    Greetings


    Johan

  7. #7
    Platinum
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    12,268
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I think it is common for poor people, whether Dominican or some other nationality, to be so focused on getting through today that they are unable to worry about the long term. Just getting enough food, medical attention, etc., to meet their immediate needs is enough for many.

  8. #8
    LarrySpencer
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by palmiche
    I remember a client telling me "how poor the dominicans were" and then told me that his credit cards were max and unable to pay the monthly rent. Who is poorer? I see people posting on this forum pretending to be affluent and feeling sorry for the dominicans because they come from a rich, 1st world country. 1st world, rich countries are full of poor people, espiritually, obese,drugaddicts and having a negative "net worth". Aren't we attracted to the Dominican way of life because of the "quality of life" found here?
    Hence the reason I will move there in five weeks. My way of life here is extremely hectic...

    At the moment I am nearly killing myself for nearly no reward. I work my regular job in the day time, get off from the and go to another and then at two in the morning, I get for yet another. While this is certainly not the norm here, it is practically necessary for one who is saving for a wedding, and to there, and to live for awhile. Although I know I will have to work while I am there, I am happy to know that I will have a decent job for four days per week and together with my wife will make plenty to have a decent roof over our heads, food in our stomachs, for the utilities, etc. So in this aspect, yes managing is easy....However, I must agree that many also view leaving, rather than trying to make things better, as to best option. My wife is one of them. While here for two years, it was her dream to return home and make changes....until she saw the contrast of home and the U.S.

    Isn't it funny that first coming her, people don't realize how good it is, but when they arrive somewhere else, they realize very quickly.....how easy it is to run to WalMart, the supermarket (a real one) or taco bell and pay less than an hours wage for a meal. This isn't the case in the Dominican Republic. If you want to go and eat at Burger King, you better work for the entire day before you can afford one hanburger. No wonder why they give up. Now I have to work each day to try and get my wife to keep looking toward her goal of making her country a little better.

  9. #9
    LarrySpencer
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by heldengebroed
    I want to put a personal point off vue here. I found out that the majority of Dominicans that i've met have 2 things in common . First off all their spirit and "joie de vivre" and second their lack off problemsolving skills for those problems that involve medium or long term planning.

    Greetings


    Johan
    Exactly...like actually planning something and getting it to start on time! I dont' know how many dinners and functions I have been to that were supposed to start at a certain time only to start an hour or two later....just because. If you ask, no one has a true explanation....that's just the way it is.

  10. #10
    Silver
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    2,485
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fred
    It was posted that their are plenty of opportunities in the DR. Then my question was, how come Dominicans in their own country cannot manage?

    The reply was that that is something for another post. So does anyone have any comments or answers?

    You.just.don't.get.it. When you walk a mile in their shoes, you may be better equipped to try to understand, but until you attempt to see where they are coming from, you're never going to get it. You always criticize Dominicans, yet have no idea what it's like to be in their shoes. You compare all Dominicans to the experience you've had with your wife's family, and that's not fair. You also cannot compare them to the story of your father, because we all know that was many years ago, and everyone around him all over the world was going through the same trials he was. Education for our fathers was never as important as it was for us, the ability to survive, however, was. Compare Dominicans with other third-world countries, and compare apples to apples, not to us, because a whole lot has to change in the country before they ever come close to living as we do. With the lack of education, resources, and overwhelming poverty Dominicans face, it's tough for any of us to understand why they cannot evolve from the vicious circle they are in. When parents force children to work instead of going to school because putting food on the table is more important at the time than thinking about the future, how well-equipped is your average Dominican going to be able to "manage", as you call it? Who has taught them what to do with the resources they have? The vast majority are not University-educated. Even University-educated teachers and nurses only make around $10,000 RD/month. Now you go down there, and you try and live and support a family of 4 on $10,000 RD/month, and let's see how well you "manage".

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •