Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21
  1. #1
    Bronze
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    1,273
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Mosquito Scarring

    This has been a concern of mine ever since I first came here and saw the long term damage that mosquitoes do to skin. We have a new housekeeper and her arms and most notably her legs are scarred something terrible. She has informed me that she has two windows and the mosquitoes come in and attack her and her child. So I gave her some inexpensive screen and a way to attach it very inexpensively. But what am I missing. Surely they don't want their children to have damaged skin for a lifetime. Why doesn't the man go buy screen and put it up. It isn't that expensive and the positives so much outweigh the little money invested. For the cost of a few beers and you have a solution.

  2. #2
    *** Sin Bin ***
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    3,468
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snuffy
    This has been a concern of mine ever since I first came here and saw the long term damage that mosquitoes do to skin. We have a new housekeeper and her arms and most notably her legs are scarred something terrible. She has informed me that she has two windows and the mosquitoes come in and attack her and her child. So I gave her some inexpensive screen and a way to attach it very inexpensively. But what am I missing. Surely they don't want their children to have damaged skin for a lifetime. Why doesn't the man go buy screen and put it up. It isn't that expensive and the positives so much outweigh the little money invested. For the cost of a few beers and you have a solution.
    Mosquito bites do not produce long term damage to the skin. The bites usually heal within a day or two leaving no mark. Your housekeeper's problem is related to secondary skin infections supported by the bite lesions. She probably has a skin condition that predisposes her to infection. She needs to strengthen her skin, and most importantly review her higiene habits and environment to check the source of infection.

  3. #3
    Bronze
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    1,273
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Mirador, I appreciate the response. I am somewhat surprised as mosquito bites leave a scar on my daughter for weeks and maybe months. I do believe these that I see on people are from being constantly attacked by mosquitoes and scratching the wound. Explain the part of strengthening the skin? Anyway, it is a big problem here in this country for those living in barrio.

  4. #4
    Silver
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    2,745
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snuffy
    Mirador, I appreciate the response. I am somewhat surprised as mosquito bites leave a scar on my daughter for weeks and maybe months. I do believe these that I see on people are from being constantly attacked by mosquitoes and scratching the wound. Explain the part of strengthening the skin? Anyway, it is a big problem here in this country for those living in barrio.
    I think "scratching the wound" is the important detail here. While I don`t scratch, I don`t get scars. As soon as I start scratching, well that`s another story... plus then you have all the "remedies" dominicans put on their wounds to get better. Often makes it worse!

  5. #5
    *** Sin Bin ***
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    3,468
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snuffy
    Mirador, I appreciate the response. I am somewhat surprised as mosquito bites leave a scar on my daughter for weeks and maybe months. I do believe these that I see on people are from being constantly attacked by mosquitoes and scratching the wound. Explain the part of strengthening the skin? Anyway, it is a big problem here in this country for those living in barrio.

    I would recommend increase consumption of vegetables and fruits high in Vitamin A, like pumpkin (auyama), mango, carrots, avocado, fully ripe peppers and tomatoes, papaya, passion fruit (as a matter of fact, most yellow and/or orange vegetables and fruits are high in Vitamin A). Also, a thirty or so minute session, three or four consecutive days, of soaking the sun (sun bath) after covering the entire body with olive or coconut oil. This should be done every three or four months for maintenance. Avoid bath soaps with added bactericides, and use instead Castille or common 'cuava' soap. Also, soaking in the sea, at least once a months. For simple scratches and mosquito bites, keep in a tray a long aloe (sábila) leaf and when needed, cut around the outer bark to expose the gel, and apply as a lotion. And last but not least, synthetic fiber bed clothing (and if possible all clothing) should be replaced by 100% cotton.

  6. #6
    Moderator - Clown Central
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    5,960
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Snuffy
    ..... For the cost of a few beers and you have a solution. ..... Anyway, it is a big problem here in this country for those living in barrio.
    Well I might as well jump in, get my feet wet on DR1, and take my chances here with the group on DR1...

    First let me say that I have been here 9 years. I talk with lots of women that live in barrios. And they almost all tell me the same things.

    The men will not buy them anything, they will not buy things for their babies, they treat the women bad and they beat them.

    And you want them to give up a few beers!

    Anyone taking offense at that or think I am wrong is more than welcome to meet me in Santiago, and we will do a live survey with the women of the barrios to back up my statement.

  7. #7
    Bronze
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    674
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default good advice

    Quote Originally Posted by Mirador
    I would recommend increase consumption of vegetables and fruits high in Vitamin A, like pumpkin (auyama), mango, carrots, avocado, fully ripe peppers and tomatoes, papaya, passion fruit (as a matter of fact, most yellow and/or orange vegetables and fruits are high in Vitamin A). Also, a thirty or so minute session, three or four consecutive days, of soaking the sun (sun bath) after covering the entire body with olive or coconut oil. This should be done every three or four months for maintenance. Avoid bath soaps with added bactericides, and use instead Castille or common 'cuava' soap. Also, soaking in the sea, at least once a months. For simple scratches and mosquito bites, keep in a tray a long aloe (sábila) leaf and when needed, cut around the outer bark to expose the gel, and apply as a lotion. And last but not least, synthetic fiber bed clothing (and if possible all clothing) should be replaced by 100% cotton.

    This is very good advice. I work in the pharmaceutical/dermatology industry, and based on the lack of medicines readily available there, you give very good advice. Her condition can be treated by a topical corticosteroid, to treat the flare, your advice will help long term.

  8. #8
    Silver
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    2,273
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    SantiagoDR,

    I went through your prior posts and failed to see a welcome mat rolled out to you so allow me to welcome you to DR1 and hope to see your continued participation in the threads. I noticed Hillbilly invited you to PM him as he lives in your town.

    Sorry everyone for the sidetrack of the thread but felt that a proper welcome was in order. Back on thread.

    Rick

  9. #9
    Bronze
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    1,273
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Mirador....wellllllllllll....why didn't you tell me that before. I didn't know that. Thanks. I will work on her. My wife says not to mention it again as she will be embarrassed. But I prefer to force them to see the solution and take the emotional pain. The end result is always better. So I will be bringing it up again. hehe.

    Santiago...I know you are right. And I know many dominican men who do a great job as a father and husband. What I will never understand is how one can turn his back on his known to be child and not care for its well being. That one just speaks volume of culture and lack of character.

  10. #10
    Silver
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    3,182
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KateP
    I think "scratching the wound" is the important detail here. While I don`t scratch, I don`t get scars. As soon as I start scratching, well that`s another story... plus then you have all the "remedies" dominicans put on their wounds to get better. Often makes it worse!
    Something that worked for me was applying "witch hazel" on the mosquito bites. After a few days the bites cleared up.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •