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  1. #1
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    Default What do "legals" in the U.S. think of

    "illegals"?
    I trying to get a consensus of what legal Dominicans (in the United States) feel about the immigration policies of the U.S.
    Would like to know if Doms who entered the US years ago, following the process, feel that illegals should be granted benefits that they did not receive.
    Perhaps you know of some situations like this or you yourself fit this category and would like to answer this question.
    john

  2. #2
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    If an individual has been living in the US illegally for many years and has not committed any crimes, worked and contributed to the success of the business they worked for, some kind of amnesty is in order. Perhaps a slap in the hand in the form of a fine or/and a return to their native country for a period of time is not out of this world.

    On this subject the following link shows how two American cities have responded to this situation.

    Lured by cheap housing and work in nearby factories and farms, the newcomers from places like the Dominican Republic and Mexico rejuvenated a dying city. By 2006, perhaps 10,000 Hispanics had settled in Hazleton, comprising 30 percent of the population. Dozens of Hispanic-owned businesses opened.
    Townhall.com::The News::News Article

  3. #3
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    "A record number of immigrants are becoming U.S. citizens by serving in the armed forces. Some are granted citizenship posthumously after they are killed in battle. But most survive the perils of war and soon pledge allegiance to the red, white and blue.

    More than 25,000 immigrants have become citizens and another 40,000 have become eligible for citizenship through the military since President Bush signed an executive order in July 2002 speeding the process.

    "We've had a record surge of applications," said Dan Kane, a spokesman for U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in Washington. Immigrants "can apply for citizenship immediately, the day they are sworn in as members of the military."

    The 40,000 immigrants in the U.S. military can become citizens after only a year of active duty. The previous requirement was three years, Kane said. "


    IBLNews

  4. #4
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    Thank you for the responses to date. I am aware of the contributions that these people make to the US economy. But, what I really want to know, and is the basis of my inquiry is; What are the sentiments of those immigrants that entered through "the process" . Do they feel that those that might be granted some form of amnesty is "fair and just"? Do they feel that those that are following in their footsteps should be entitled to something that they didn't get 10 years ago?

  5. #5
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    Don't bother me none, but I'm still thinking about what I did not get then that they may get know.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by johne View Post
    What are the sentiments of those immigrants that entered through "the process"
    There is a feeling that cheating is being rewarded which takes all the sense out of doing things the right way.

    Some people do everything they can to follow the rules and others do everything they can to break them.

    The two types can't be treated with indifference.

    Quote Originally Posted by johne
    Do they feel that those that might be granted some form of amnesty is "fair and just"?
    I don't know if its "fair and just", but it sure makes one question of whats the point to subject oneself to the legal and tedious procedures when you could have done it the illegal way and still get away with it!

    Not that the illegal way is easy or anything of the sort, but it can't be harder than the legal way. Otherwise, everyone would be legal, no?

    Quote Originally Posted by johne
    Do they feel that those that are following in their footsteps should be entitled to something that they didn't get 10 years ago
    The only people in the footsteps of people who entered the US legally are those forming a line at US embassies around the world and applying for visas and doing things the right way.

    Those who are taking matters into their own hands, well they are following someone's footsteps but not the one's who did it the legal way, that's for sure.

    It's a very controversial topic.

    Basically, people who are legal oppose this notion of amnesty while people who are either illegal or who are legal but know people who are illegal generally support it.

    And then there are those (an extreme minority, I would say, but they do exist) that believe that the entire existance of the US falls on Hispanics and because of that, Hispanics are the one's with the real power and control here and this immigration dilemma is a way for Hispanics to show the majority where the power really lies.

    This group often polarizes the Hispanic community by claiming that those Hispanics who don't agree with them are "wannabes". In essence, their claim is that a true Hispanic is a person who supports amnesty and anyone who thinks otherwise is a sort of traitor to the Hispanic community.

    They never make a distinction between illegal immigrants and legal immigrants; to them both form one giant group of people going through the same struggles - which is a lie because the people afraid right now are not the one's who are legal, unless they know someone who is illegal, etc.

    Personally I feel that this topic is a complete mess and most Hispanics are following the general consensus that is repeated in all the media forms targeting the Hispanic community and that consensus is pro-illegal immigrants and pro-amnesty.

    But then again, this is no surprise. Most people, irrespective of ethnicity, race, or nationality; don't really think for themselves but rather let others (particularly the media) do the thinking for them.

    Anyone who thinks differently from the crowd is seen as a traitor or a wannabe.

    I look at this issue in the most rational way possible and that leads me to conclude that people who follow the laws, who do things the right way, who go through all the trouble to respect the people and government of the United States ought to be treated with dignity and granting the same rights to people who took the relatively easy way to enter this country is an insult to those who stood in line and filled all the papers and maintained a level of respect to the laws and regulations of the United States and its people.

    Only those who are willing to give their lives for the US ought to be given their citizenship with no hassles, but everyone else simply needs to follow the rules of the game.

    That's my take on this.

    -NALs

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    Quote Originally Posted by NALs View Post

    The only people in the footsteps of people who entered the US legally are those forming a line at US embassies around the world and applying for visas and doing things the right way.

    -NALs
    If some of those people were poor and hungry and bordering the US instead of having oceans separating them, I wonder how many would be standing on line.

  8. #8
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    FYI - Everyone in the U.S. is illegal - besides American Indians..

    On another note - what does Lic. mean when you receive a business card from someone in DR? Does it mean they are a lawyer? if so there are a lot of lawyers in DR. If not , what is the equivalent in the DR - is it a notary public??

  9. #9
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    Lic. (Licenciado) is used to indicate that the person has graduated from college. It is roughly the equivalent of a BA.

    You might also see Ma. (Magister) which is the Masters' degree.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by David34 View Post
    FYI - Everyone in the U.S. is illegal - besides American Indians..
    Guess what buddy scientist believe that at one time those indigenous people came from somewhere else, so are they illegal too. Anyway pretty much universally with very few exceptions the country you are born in you are not illegal.

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