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  1. #1
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    Question Dominican wealth

    Has anyone else found that "upper class" Dominicans sometimes have a wildly overinflated view of Dominican wealth on an international level?

    Here's a great example from DR1 of what they believe, I have run into this frequently:

    For the Dominican upper crust spending their weekends in their Miami vacation homes is commonplace. The Swiss Alps are full of Dominicans skiing. We are not all Julio Iglesias, but Julio Iglesias did not come to the Dominican Republic to rub shoulders with the Montecarlo set. He came here to rub shoulders with the Dominican set. We got plenty of them that can match wallets. You certainly don't know how much money flows in this little island.

    You think Bill Clinton likes Punta Cana because he wants to see Germans and Italians? He comes here because we got people that can blow them away. Clinton did not have to spend a dime to stay here. Plus he left with his pockets full. He also wants to come back for more.
    http://www.dr1.com/forums/81288-post16.html

    Why do they believe this?

    Adrian

  2. #2
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    Rich dominicans "quieren aparentar tirarse el peo mas arriba del cul0".

  3. #3
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    I played 'guess the poster' and got it in one.

    Although it is a feature of the island mentality to have an overinflated sense of the country's importance in relation to the wider scheme of things, to be fair I don't think this perception is unique to Dominicans. I've heard stuff like that from people in other places in Latin America and elsewhere.

  4. #4
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    Latin American culture has and continues to be a class oriented society where what you do and who you know is much more important than the balance of your bank account.

    Iíve had the experience of meeting many Ďrichí Dominicans and my experience is that these individuals donít consider the bulk of the Dominican population to be their equals.

    Iíll give you an example. One night I was Ocean World Casino playing black jack and sitting next to me was a stunning blond Dominican woman. After a few hands I struck up a conversation with her. She was from Santo Domingo and had very few positive things to say about her fellow countrymen. Her attitude was one that the majority of her countrymen are poor because theyíre lazy. In her mind the poorest of the poor have the same opportunity she had.

    The OPís quote is an example of this kind of Beaujolais attitude towards the lower classes. In this persons mind the exploitation of the poor in their country is an example of why they are equal or superior to the middle class of America.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackieboo View Post
    Latin American culture has and continues to be a class oriented society where what you do and who you know is much more important than the balance of your bank account.

    Iíve had the experience of meeting many Ďrichí Dominicans and my experience is that these individuals donít consider the bulk of the Dominican population to be their equals.

    Iíll give you an example. One night I was Ocean World Casino playing black jack and sitting next to me was a stunning blond Dominican woman. After a few hands I struck up a conversation with her. She was from Santo Domingo and had very few positive things to say about her fellow countrymen. Her attitude was one that the majority of her countrymen are poor because theyíre lazy. In her mind the poorest of the poor have the same opportunity she had.
    Well, the poor do share in the responsibility department. Plenty of Dominicans of poor backgrounds are living in the U.S. and a good number of them are wasting time, despite all the opportunities available to them.

    Also, many Dominicans of humble origins have moved up through determination, hard work, and perseverance. Look at the owners of Adrian Tropical in Santo Domingo as an example, but there are plenty all over the DR.

    Everyone doesn't have the same opportunities, but opportunities do knock in every door. People just need to learn to recognize them when they do knock.

    Some do just that, but most don't.

    -NALs

  6. #6
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    AMBITIOUS
    My wife's brother in Santo Domingo works at an internet cafe and goes to school. After he puts his weekly family contribution in for food, having his clothes washed etc. he saves his money. He doesn't hang out all night at the calmado wasting what he has. He was thinking about getting a car, but instead is opening a moto repair business in Los Patos at age 22. - YOUNG AND AMBITIOUS-

    LAZY
    My wife's cousin still can't wait for me to open my suitcase to see what little gifts I bring from the US, asks his mother to wire him money from Madrid at age 41. Drinks and smokes up his money as soon as he gets it. Whatever easy way he can think of to get 50 pesos here and there he will do. Doesn't work, although there is a new shopping mall and construction work available all over his neigborhood.

    MORAL OF THE STORY
    D.R. is very dry when it comes to ways for the average man or woman to make good money, but just like anywhere, some people have that need to succeed and overcome, some people don't.

  7. #7
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    I have heard many stories about Dominicans having lots of money but very little class. Going out to some bars and other places in SD you see some horrible incidents of people who are just determined to show off how much something costs, even though it is hideous. I remember someone buying a bottle of red Burgundy at around DR$6,000 (naturally the most expensive thing on the drinks list) and dunking it in a bucket of ice until it was nearly frozen. The french person I was with, newly arrived in the DR, just watched open mouthed in astonishment.

    Anyone who has spent any time with rich Dominicans knows that their favourite topic of conversation is how much their clothes/car/holiday to switzerland/kids education cost, rather than whether it was a nice shirt/reliable car/good holiday/good education.

  8. #8
    naturelover
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    what an unfortunate turn of phrase "blowing bill clinton away"

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by George Holmes View Post
    Anyone who has spent any time with rich Dominicans knows that their favourite topic of conversation is how much their clothes/car/holiday to switzerland/kids education cost, rather than whether it was a nice shirt/reliable car/good holiday/good education.
    Unfortunately, even some of the "prive en rico" like to flaunt what little they have. I have had quite a few Dominicans, shortly after having met them, start to tell me what stuff they have, as if I could care in the least. Even some of the family does this too - it is a disease that they should be so wrapped up in material things, and I thought Americans were the worst about that.

    What is funny is when I take my daughter to the colegio on my motorbike about a half mile down the street, all lot of the Dominican take their children there and the line of cars waiting to drop off their kids must be 1000 feet long replete with Mercedes and Land Rovers. Typically, 90% of the people are dressed to the hilt and talking on the cell phone. So many of them stare at me as if I was crazy - as I quickly make myself to the front of the line w/o waiting to drop off my daughter while dressed in my exceedingly comfortable jeans and tshirt.

    I have, however, noticed that some of the wealthier and well travelled Dominicans, while still dressed in impeccable attire and drive around in the lates most expensive car, don't talk so much about wealth - I figure they probably have met enough Americans to know that they typically aren't impressed with stuff like that.

    Nonetheless, I find talking with Domincans a pleasure. In fact I won't hesitate to say that I have more friends and acquaintance here in a year and a half in the DR that I had in almost 6 years in Orlando. This place is definitely a lot more fun than my home country for that one reason, el calor humano. It is funny how Dominicans can excel at the two seemingly dichotic entities, materialism and genteelness.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by NALs View Post
    Well, the poor do share in the responsibility department. Plenty of Dominicans of poor backgrounds are living in the U.S. and a good number of them are wasting time, despite all the opportunities available to them.

    Also, many Dominicans of humble origins have moved up through determination, hard work, and perseverance. Look at the owners of Adrian Tropical in Santo Domingo as an example, but there are plenty all over the DR.

    Everyone doesn't have the same opportunities, but opportunities do knock in every door. People just need to learn to recognize them when they do knock.

    Some do just that, but most don't.

    -NALs
    I agree with you in this,poor Dominican people can sometimes be very lazy and blame the Presidente for all their problems.
    They want everything hand out to them for nothing.

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