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  1. #1
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    Default I am thinking of going to PUCMM

    I currently live in the U.S. I want to study Medicine in PUCMM. My parents are Domincan and I've been there a few times. But people tell me is not a very good idea since D.R. is a third-world country and doesnt have the technology.
    How good is the school? Will I have any problems seeking residency in the U.S. after?

  2. #2
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    Go for it. PUCMM is a fine university. Their medicine school right now is located in Santiago, where the HOM will be opening, with the latest of technology. For sure, their students will be working there. I also have heard that PUCMM plans to open a medical school at their Santo Domingo branch. In Santo Domingo, the most modern technology, I believe, is at the Plaza de la Salud. The better universities usually make arrangements for their graduates to use new technologies.

    Hundreds of Dominican university graduates are practicing medicine in the US, and many have achieved outstanding positions. The savings are the main incentive. You can graduate without being heavily in debt. Plus in the DR you get more hands on experience with patients, which is helpful.

    You should consider getting your exequatur, which enables you to practice in the DR, even if you plan to work in the US. I have been told it works in your favor when being foreign trained and seeking employment in the US to have been authorized to practice in the country where you did your training.

    My sister, a former DR medicine graduate (INTEC), works at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas and encourages Dominican graduates to seek medical residency in Texas.

    Hillbilly, is the DR1 resident expert on PUCMM affairs. He may respond to you with specifics about the PUCMM medical school.

  3. #3
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    Thank you Dolores.

    Of course you should come to PUCMM.
    IF you have good Spanish, like to study and really want to become a doctor. The university does not cater to non-Spanish speaking students.

    As for difficulty getting into a residency in the US, a lot will depend on your scores in the "boards", and just precisely what field you are going to specialize in....some are more difficult to get into than others. But that is 6 years down the line....
    Basically, as a US citizen, you have a big step up from foreigners frying to get into residency programs..

    Good Luck,

    HB

  4. #4
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    Thank you for the insite.

    I speak fluent spanish and can read and write very well also. I just got out of high school and plan on attending in January 2008 in Santiago. My relatives think that going to D.R. to study Medicine is insane. They believe that there is nothing better than the U.S. "the land of oppotunity". They say that the people over there (DR) want to come here (US) to study and im going backwards. I plan on doing my med education there then come back to the states to specialize in Pediatrics.

    I heard its much harder now to get residency in the U.S. after what happened with the closing of the two Dominican Universities and the "selling" of diplomas.

    Dolores: Was is difficult for your sister to go to the U.S? How long did it take her? Was she treated differently since she's a foreign student?

    Hillbilly: Are there many international students at PUCMM now? How is the staff/ professors? What can I expect going to PUCMM (academically and socially)?

  5. #5
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    The closing of two Dominican universities and the "selling" of diplomas happened many many years ago. The successes of Dominican med graduates has paved the way for newcomers. My sister was one of the first graduates of INTEC to go abroad and opened many doors for future graduates of Dominican universities, including the PUCMM.

    She took the INTEC five year program (there were only two week breaks between each trimester), and then did a year working at the leading San Pedro de Macoris public hospital to get her exequatur or license to practice in the DR. Then she took all the tests to secure a residency as an intern in the US (she started in Trenton, New Jersey), and then did her specialty, geriatrics (I believe that was at John Hopkins, Maryland). She also did post graduate studies in teaching medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. She has been president of the Texas Society of Geriatrics.

    She dates back to the early 80s, a time when not much was expected of a Latina. I recall her telling me that those who would interview her for a job (many times filling a quota for woman and Hispanic) would be surprised when they met her. She also had a hard time back then because the closing of the Dominican med schools was recent.

    Not so long ago she mentioned there is a deficit of doctors in the US, so there are more openings for foreign graduates. Of course, it will depend on your own efforts. The doors are open but you will have lots of competition.
    Last edited by Dolores; 09-06-2007 at 02:57 PM.

  6. #6
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    Allow me to be the voice of dissent:

    I don't think the PUCMM, which is the country's best university, measures up favorably with any American university. No doubt it's possible to get an education there.

    But don't expect it to be like most American universities and don't expect Americans (like those who make decisions on residencies) to treat it as such.

    The DR is a great country and a wonderful place to live. But its educational standards are lower than North America. Don't let anyone kid you.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by fightingirish View Post
    Allow me to be the voice of dissent:

    I don't think the PUCMM, which is the country's best university, measures up favorably with any American university. No doubt it's possible to get an education there.

    But don't expect it to be like most American universities and don't expect Americans (like those who make decisions on residencies) to treat it as such.

    The DR is a great country and a wonderful place to live. But its educational standards are lower than North America. Don't let anyone kid you.
    In other words..If you go to a bad US university it will be better that if you go to a good one in DR. Why? well is a kind of stereotype that overseas universities are not better than american ones. You can be a pretty good professional but will find yourself with a recent-graduate salary in US.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by fightingirish View Post
    Allow me to be the voice of dissent:

    I don't think the PUCMM, which is the country's best university, measures up favorably with any American university. No doubt it's possible to get an education there.

    But don't expect it to be like most American universities and don't expect Americans (like those who make decisions on residencies) to treat it as such.

    The DR is a great country and a wonderful place to live. But its educational standards are lower than North America. Don't let anyone kid you.
    I don't necessarily disagree with you, but on what are you drawing your answer? Do you know PUCMM graduates that haven't fared well, show poor educational standards. Otherwise, as the voice of dissent, qualify your statement. I've met many graduates of so-called Good universities in the USA, and found some of these people have been sadly lacking in many of the basics of Science...etc.

  9. #9
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    I can happily let the record of PUCMM graduates at resident programs around the world speak for itself. It does a good job at preparing doctors, no doubt about it.
    Our laboratories are modern, the teaching facilities are more than adequate and the professors are well trained.
    The curriculum was originally modular all the way. Designed by the University of Chicago, Harvard and the World Health Organization. I forgot how many man/years of planning went into it. It was cutting edge.

    Over the years, there has been some modification of the curriculum, and the latest revision will place more emphasis on some of the medical sciences in order to better prepare the graduates that want to take the "boards".

    As for your parents, tell them to thank their lucky stars you are intelligent enough to make this decision. Do they have $250,000 for your Undergraduate studies in pre-med? And another $530,000 for your Med School bills (conservative estimate at current tuition levels at major schools)??????????

    Give me a break! Your chances of even getting into a pre-med program are minimal at best unless you went to Choat, Andover or Exeter or St. Paul's or Canterbury and were top of your class. Or #1 with a huge CV at a public school.Plus 1500 + on the SATs.....

    At PUCMM we tend to weed out the poor students and the ones with real vocation for medicine are the stars..and we find them, believe me, we find them.

    You had better start the process if you intend to start in January. You need a bunch of stuff from the states translated, a Dominican passport would be needed, too, or you pay as a US citizen. Let me know if you need help with any of this.

    How do I know this? Like 42 years teaching there, and a whole flock of administrative duties way back when....

    HB

  10. #10
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    Thank You all for the helpful information.

    Dolores: You must be a proud sister! Your sister has accomplished so much in her career. She has broken so many taboos not only being a female, but a Hispanic female. I hope to one day be as accomplished as she is.

    About Dominican Universities not measuring up to American Universities:

    Fightingirish: Like bob saunders, not to contradict what you are saying but along with JOKL, I think that foreign universities are stereotyped. I've done a lot of research and there are many American Universities that have partnerships with PUCMM (specifically speaking) so that their students can go abroad and study. So if Dominican Universities dont measure up, my would "Good" American Universities/Colleges allow their students to go to such? I understand that the curriculum and the way of teaching isn't the same. This is the exact point that my relatives argue with me. Its always good to see the other side of the spectrum.

    Hillbilly: It is ridiculous how hard it is to get into pre-med! If you didnt graduate from a prestigious boarding school, or have a parent who is a doctor or a parent who graduated from the University you are applying to, then your chances are very slim. And you better believe my parents dont have $250,000 for pre-med and the $530,000 is definitely out of question! I will definitely start the process this coming week. The dominican passport.. I get from my parents..right? I intend on going to D.R. in November for the inscription and testing.

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